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pcmacd

lg lfx23961sw fridge cool spot

11 posts in this topic

This ~18 cu. ft. bottom freezer, French Door fridge has been a serious PITA ever since I bought it.  Sure glad I got the extended warranty.

 

Yesterday I noticed that the left side of the fridge, OUTSIDE, half way down and about 1/3 from back to front, was cold. 

 

  • Cold enough that when I reached over for the coffee filter, I felt the cold before I even touched anything. 
  • So cold that water was dripping down onto the floor. 
     
  • This can't be good for my electrical bills.

 

All the doors are properly sealed (but this is noplace near the door.)  The "cold spot" is approximately a square foot in area.

 

I have a service call in on this, but I hate to waste their money if this is standard.  If it is standard, I have to wonder why I never noticed this before, as I have had the thing out from the wall a dozen or more times.

 

Any hints?

 

tx

 

mac

Edited by pcmacd

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

Void in the insulation foam between liner and cabinet - non-repairable, if you have LG rep coming will result in new fridge

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Thanks for your prompt response.

  • ...kinda what I expected.

What the what else could it be?

 

What troubles me is that I have not previously noticed it.  I cannot imagine a scenario where the styro just decides to evaporate?

 

The service guys have been in the back of the freezer a few times with the coils exposed, but still, nothing that could have made this happen???

I had a minor in refrigeration at Purdue, as an M.E., and significant experience in repair of industrial refrigeration and cooling at US Steel in Gary IN (read HIGH TEMP ENVIRONS ACs on gantry cranes above several 300 ton heats of steel.... as well as such mundane things as window units & water coolers) AND, to get the freaking pint, _sort of expected_ this precise answer.

I cannot imagine what this has been doing to my Southern Kalifornia Edison bill every month for the last four or five years.

Tanks again.

mac

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Did any one work on the sealed system ???           As in, refrigerant was added ????

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Nope.  No insertion. No leaking gas here. 

 

The fridge seems to otherwise be running fine, so it does not look like a freon spout!

 

  • It's just... sheesh! 
     
  • Why in the blazing hell do I have this 1.0 to 1.5 square foot of very COLD on the left, ~center outside of the fridge sheet metal ??? 
     
  • This is nuts.

Tanks for your reply.

 

mac

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Well, the very competent, pleasant factory repair guy for the LA area called today.

 

It seems they are using less and less insulation to make more room in the fridge for food.

 

He's not the kind of guy who would bullshit a person.  Not at all.

 

So?  I guess this has always been there and I have not noticed it?

 

  1. I am truly conflicted. 

    I cannot imagine for a moment an Engergy Star rated appliance having such a gaping energy leak.
     
  2. I never noticed this before.  Consider that I have had this thing out a few times to clean the coils, that I have [ancient] experience in servicing refrigeration units of all flavors, and that I'm a mechanical engineer with all manner of experience in the proper design of stuff.
     
  3. I just don't know what to think.  The service guy says that these units do it.  I believe him; I still find it incredible that a designer would throw energy away in order to store a couple more pork chops.

Sheesh.

 

mac

 

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<<<I have [ancient] experience in servicing refrigeration units of all flavors, and that I'm a mechanical engineer with all manner of experience in the proper design of stuff.>>>
 

 

<<<I still find it incredible that a designer would throw energy away in order to store a couple more pork chops.>>>

 

**********************************

 

Fiberglass is no longer used---except perhaps---in el cheapo refrigerators.

 

 

http://www.polyurethanes.org/index.php?page=refrigeration-and-freezers

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Thanks for your reply.

 

Why did you bring up fiberglass? 

 

  • I assumed the insulation is styrofoam or polyurethane....

 

mac

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<<<Why did you bring up fiberglass? 

 

  • I assumed the insulation is styrofoam or polyurethane....>>>

 

***************************************

 

Oh...

 

Wasn't sure how current that you were---on the type of insulation used.

 

But you also posted...

 

***************************************

 

<<<I still find it incredible that a designer would throw energy away in order to store a couple more pork chops.>>>

 

***************************************

 

To achieve more space in refrigerators (cu ft size)---newer *ultra thin insulation* technology is used.

 

It's not likely that energy efficiency would be compromised for larger capacity these days---especially with the DOE mandated energy guide and others (Tier 1,2,3 ratings etc).

 

BTW---I agree with Kdog...

 

Likely a flaw/fault in the injected-then-cured insulation (pocket/gap) on your LG refrig....

Not *common* but---have seen it before.

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Well, the tech, "JAMES", has been pretty straight.  He also goes to (extreme!) lengths to explain things that I already understand, so I know he's doing his best here.

 

He says he sees this all the time; condensation on the outer skin of an LG box NOT around the door seals.

 

He's to straight to doubt his assessment.

 

Should I post to a larger audience on LG issues??

 

thanks to 'yall for your support.

 

mac

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Power to you and God speed...

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