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suemarian

Finished with KitchenAid

70 posts in this topic

... requires removing the dishwasher from under the counter.

flow-thru heater replacement :woot:

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

I also am a Bosch authorized servicer.  I toured the dishwasher plant in New Bern, NC and totally disassembled and reassembled one of their top of the line dishwashers in in one hour, and guess what?  I also got to test the dishwasher after I was done reassembling it and it worked with no leaks!

 

The plant manager was so impressed with my work,  they made me the #1 servicer in my geographical territory.

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flow-thru heater replacement :woot:

Never had to replace a flow thru heater or NTC on a Bosch dishwasher, they've all been control module problems. 

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<<<The plant manager was so impressed with my work,  they made me the #1 servicer in my geographical territory.>>>

 

******************

 

Any proof of that ?

 

Or must I yet again---take your *word* for it...


 

Edited by john63

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You must have a personal vendetta against me. From now on I will ignore your posts.

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Sweet Mother of God!

 

THANK YOU!

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It's a new year!

Edited by DurhamAppliance

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I also am a Bosch authorized servicer.  I toured the dishwasher plant in New Bern, NC and totally disassembled and reassembled one of their top of the line dishwashers in in one hour, and guess what?  I also got to test the dishwasher after I was done reassembling it and it worked with no leaks!

 

The plant manager was so impressed with my work,  they made me the #1 servicer in my geographical territory.

 

Congratulations!

 

(Now of course I bug you every time I get a Bosch. Like: "Hey Scott, what's a pressure switch look like on this alien scripture they call a wiring diagram?!")

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lol - not sure how I missed this thread!  Lots of fun all around!  I love vendettas!  lol.

 

Re: Dishwasher control fires - is there any brand that has NOT had a melted control?  I've got pics somewhere of a Miele one as well as a soap dispenser 'fire' on a Bosch.  Anywhere you put the 'spark' of life - you have potential for fire.  

 

Here's another Whirlpool one for your viewing enjoyment:  http://neighboursappliance.com/2012/07/dishwasher-fire-close-call.html

Edited by Strathy

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lol - epidemic ... like the sky is falling kind?  lol.  Who here has not seen burnt wire connections on dishwashers ... stoves ... washer motors ... dryers ...  I tell people its what electricity does.  The kitchen aid is pulling 9.5 amps through that connector, there's going to be a failure on a certain percentage of them.  Usually the thermal fuse blows before much damage is done ... it's the ones that catch fire without the thermal fuse blowing that leave me scratching my head.

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lol - epidemic ... like the sky is falling kind? lol.

No, it was merely a tongue-in-cheek way of pointing out a design flaw-- that terminal is improperly spec'd for the load its carrying. This is a common fail point in this machine. Every machine has at least one and they're all engineering problems. It is academically interesting (to me, anyway) to ascertain what the Achilles Heel is in a particular machine.

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... I know what you meant.  My reply was tongue-in-cheek to all the Chicken Little's out there.  lol.

 

I'm not even convinced that anybody could have predicted that being a common failure point on these units.  There are plenty of that sort of pin connector that carry loads especially in wall ovens, and we don't see them fail much.  I think that moisture might have something to do with it in this case.  Moisture + volts = corrosion = hot connection.   That's how I see it anyway.

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 I think that moisture might have something to do with it in this case.  Moisture + volts = corrosion = hot connection.   That's how I see it anyway.

 

That's a good thought-- the configuration of the door components could be such that water vapor happens to migrate to that point.  I was speculating that the terminal needed to be larger or be stiffer (different metal composition/higher quality) to withstand the repeated heat fatigue load from the current flowing through it.  

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Maybe all the manufacturers need to go back to mechanical timers and say the hell with the electronic control boards.  That won't happen anytime soon, USA consumers are so lazy, they don't want to hurt their hands turning a timer dial.

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<<<USA consumers are so lazy, they don't want to hurt their hands turning a timer dial.>>>

 

*********************

 

Which study are you referring to?

 

**********************

 

<<<Maybe all the manufacturers need to go back to mechanical timers and say the hell with the electronic control boards.  That won't happen anytime soon>>>

 

***********************

 

Why haven't the manufacturers said: "The Hell with Electronic Control Boards" ?

 

Enlighten us with your infinite wisdom on such matters...
 

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Whew...getting hot in here....must be the climate change. Anyhow, this plant manager made him this...that plant manager made him that..big deal. My wife was so impressed with the job I did repairing the bathroom the other day that from now on, I will be her "A number one" official toilet bowl plunger. Now who here can beat that?

Edited by DurhamAppliance

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 <<<It is academically interesting (to me, anyway) to ascertain what the Achilles Heel is in a particular machine.>>>

 

********************

 

Likewise :)

 

And an excellent idea for discussions in the DOJO--- all of the various "achilles heels" in appliances.
 

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Mechanical timers?  Really?  You guys remember those?  Fused contacts causing elements to stay on for ever on DW's.  Timer contacts fused causing units to fill forever ... spring arms breaking off and shorting out the whole thing with lots of smoke and burns everywhere.  I'm pretty sure I have pictures somewhere of these - not digital of course ... lol.  Sure mechanical timers made more sense to us old guys, but I'm NOT convinced they were any more stable or safer than electronic boards.  



BTW - what's with Scott and John?  You guys having some sort of lovers quarrel?  

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<<<BTW - what's with Scott and John?  You guys having some sort of lovers quarrel?>>>

 

*************

 

More like an Intellectual Gravitas quarrel...

 

 

 

 


 

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Thems words are too bigs for me ... lol.  Sounds painful whatever it is.   

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I work on a lot of dish washers with mechanical timer , failure rates are still high

cost cutting is the problem , silver prices are high and a good contact contains silver

 

people really like the wow factor of push button controls

 

"knobs are for your grandma's appliances "

 

the control board interface is here to stay

 

when you get right down to it , more failures = more money

 

where would we all be if it lasted forever ?

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I'm NOT convinced they were any more stable or safer than electronic boards.  

BTW - what's with Scott and John?  You guys having some sort of lovers quarrel?  

Technically you may be correct but in practice, maybe because of shoddiness of current manufacturing, older mechanical timers have been more stable. But they also typically do fewer functions. I do know one thing for sure, roach infested appliances with digital timers/clocks do not hold up nearly as well as those with mechanical timer/clocks. This is also true with moist environs. But these are outside influences. So then I'll amend my first sentence to read, "technically and in a vacuum, you may be correct"

Btw yeah they be in wub

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<<<Sounds painful whatever it is>>>

 

*************

 

It is :)

 

**************

 

<<<I work on a lot of dish washers with mechanical timer , failure rates are still high

cost cutting is the problem , silver prices are high and a good contact contains silver>>>

 

**************

 

I agree

 

**************

 

<<<people really like the wow factor of push button controls>>>

 

**************

 

That's true to a large extent---though---some consumers are "luddites".

 

***************

 

<<<when you get right down to it , more failures = more money>>>

 

****************

 

Absolutely :)

 

****************

 

<<<where would we all be if it lasted forever ?>>>

 

*****************

 

Quality built appliances does not eliminate the need for appliance service.

 

When I started back in the early 80s---there were more than a few appliances around from the early-to-mid-60s (and a few from the late 50s).

 

These were a marvel of longevity/durability/quality---and customers knew it.

 

They were very agreeable to repairing these older machines because it had served them well. Some consumers were even sentimental---"We bought that washer when we married and then had two children---now grown".

 

No. Quality *helps* the servicer.

 

If everyone bought their new appliances on the very same day in January 1960 (and I mean EVERYONE)---then yes---that would cause a "dust-bowl-type-drought" in demand for repair services for several years.

 

 

 

 


 

Edited by john63

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