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Scavenger

Kenmore Elite Dual Oven - takes along time to come up to temp

18 posts in this topic

We've owned this oven for the past 5 years.  In the past year it can be sporadic on how long it takes to bring the oven up to temperature.  It started with just the top oven, but now the bottom oven is acting up as well.  As an example, it just took about 45-60 minutes to bring the oven up to 350 degrees.

 

This is a Kenmore Elite 30" Dual Wall oven, bought from Sears Canada.  The model is C970-419232 which I can't find at this site but which comes up as an Electrolux model on a google search.

 

Any ideas what the problem could be?  I'm thinking either element or thermostat, but that's just a guess.

 

Thanks.

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For what it's worth, many of these oven temp sensors will test at the normal ohms range (about 1K Ohms--see your data sheet) at 70 degrees, yet it is the variation of temperatures that may actually indicate that the sensor is bad. After going through the calibration of the oven--see owner's manual or data sheet--I then test the sensor at room temp. If OK, then you might "run a range of temperatures" by measuring resistance at different temps. Easiest way is to heat oven to highest temp, put an oven thermometer in oven, measure ohms at ERC (control board), match ohm value measure with temp on oven thermometer you placed in oven as temp falls within oven. Of course, when measuring anything electric for ohms--power is off.  

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... it just took about 45-60 minutes to bring the oven up to 350 degrees.

On the way to 350, does the Oven temperature read-out match the actual Oven temperature ?

i.e. when the Oven says "300" is the actual temperature 300 ?

Does the Oven Bake Element turn OFF before it's up to "set temperature" 350 ?

i.e. when it says 300, is the Bake Element ON or OFF ?

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Check your temp sensors as others suggest. I also would concentrate on your thermal fuses. The thermal fuses in your oven interrupts one leg of the 220v circuit. If the fuse trips, only 110v is sent to the bake element resulting in very long heat up times. There is a fuse for each oven. This fuse also has a reset button on it. I would try to reset them and or replace them. You may have to access them from the rear. The part is #119 on your diagram and is found here http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Thermal-Fuse/318004900/499302

Edited by DurhamAppliance

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The problem IS intermiten.   It could be the relays on the board not making good contact at all times & ellements get 120 instead of 240.  Best way is to keep log book next to oven, to see if there is a pattern or are you just forgetful?  Also pulling oven out of wall & measuring voltage going to ellements, if it was a real old one I would say weak ellements but its fairly new.

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Thanks for the all responses. :-)

 

"On the way to 350, does the Oven temperature read-out match the actual Oven temperature ?
i.e. when the Oven says "300" is the actual temperature 300 ?"

 

Unfortunately, when the oven is set at 350, it continues to read 350.  That is, it doesn't show you the

progress of the heating cycle up to the set temperature.

 

Those thermal fuses are expensive - hope it's not that.  :woot: 

 

It seems pretty consistent in not working well.  My better-half stopped using the upper oven a

few months ago.  Now the lower is acting up.  Actually, I can't say it's not heating properly.  One

issue is it takes a looong time for the "I've reached temperature" beep to sound.  I'll buy a manual

oven thermometer to see if it's reaching temp but just not alarming, or not reaching temp for an

exceptionally long time.

 

Sometimes I wish I didn't live a one hour drive from a repairman.  Travel-time alone can drive the

total cost up if multiple trips are needed to swap parts.

 

Thanks again.
 

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These type of intermittant problems can be related to 240 power supply, or relay problems. (relay=control)

Verify 240 is good (L1 to neutral=120, L2 to neutral= 120, L1 to L2=240, neutral to ground= 0v)

Check control for bad connections at relays(wires/solder joints)

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Well at least the fuses have a reset button...Doesn't cost anything to try it or even temporarily bypass them.

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I beleive that oven has "hidden" bake elements under the floors of the cavities - one or more of these may have failed - be sure to verify proper power is being supplied to the oven (120v/240v)

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I beleive that oven has "hidden" bake elements under the floors of the cavities - one or more of these may have failed - be sure to verify proper power is being supplied to the oven (120v/240v)

That's also a strong possibility with the preheating only being performed by the "broil assist" feature.

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All great suggestions.  To help me prioritize them, would it be less likely that it's an input power problem since initially it was just an upper oven issue.  Now it's affecting both.  A power problem would have impacted both at the same time, right?  Correct me if I'm wrong.  Don't want to rule something out based on bad assumptions. :-)

 

Thanks again to everyone.

Edited by Scavenger

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All great suggestions. To help me prioritize them, would it be less likely that it's an input power problem since initially it was just an upper oven issue. Now it's affecting both. A power problem would have impacted both at the same time, right? Correct me if I'm wrong. Don't want to rule something out based on bad assumptions. :-)

Thanks again to everyone.

Pretty good assumption.... Each oven has its own element, sensor and fuse. They could go out separately. You gonna have to work but it costs you nothing to test these items. Right now you are experiencing paralysis of analysis. Use the process of elimimation and begin ruling out these items. Edited by DurhamAppliance

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Oven heating Elements use 240v ... L1 & L2 ...they don't use Neutral

If a Thermal Fuse opens one leg of power .. it'll have 0v across the Element.

 

 

do they use Self-Clean ?  :nono:

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Oven heating Elements use 240v ... L1 & L2 ...they don't use Neutral

If a Thermal Fuse opens one leg of power .. it'll have 0v across the Element.

 

That makes sense and sort of what i expected but I have fixed this model several times with the same symptom and the problem was eithera tripped or bad thermal fuse. The ovens did slowly preheat but it was more than likely a result of broil assist feature.

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I see convection ovens alot that have a bad thermal overload and heat using the convect fan for preheat, forever, topping out at about 200 degrees

Usually the convect fan is on its on circuit, therefor the convect fan keeps heating despite the blown thermal

Edit: In fact, just recently I had a frigidaire slide in with a blown thermal, and in the parts listing it lists the thermal as a fan thermostat, and the fan thermostat as the tco. So watch out for that. 

Also, you need to get to your board and make sure its closing its relays appropriately. 

Edited by RussTech

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I beleive that oven has "hidden" bake elements under the floors of the cavities - one or more of these may have failed - be sure to verify proper power is being supplied to the oven (120v/240v)

Focus on verify 240 volts to elements, this probably cycles different elements during preheat. If problem is now in both ovens I smell a burnt connection somewhere

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..... The ovens did slowly preheat but it was more than likely a result of broil assist feature.

 

DING DING DING!

 

1) A bad temp probe will never alter how fast an oven heats, only the temp that it heats to. If the probe is the issue then the temp will be just plain wrong.

 

2) Slow heat in an electric oven is a dead give-away that more than one element is used during preheating and not all of them are functioning. This means that the oven is heating on less then full power, causing it to take longer to heat.

 

3) IF THIS IS AN INTERMITTENT PROBLEM THEN STOP SCREWING AROUND AND GET IT FIXED PROFESSIONALLY BEFORE YOU BURN YOUR HOUSE DOWN.

  • The issue is almost certainly a loose connection in the bake element circuit or a bad bake element itself. Since it's intermittent, I'd bet on the former.
  • Loose connections are an extreme fire hazard.
  • Here is a link showing how bad it really is... which is something every technician should know inside out, upside down and backwards:

http://www.weimannelectric.com/id12.html

 

AGAIN: IF THIS IS AN INTERMITTENT PROBLEM WITH 240 VOLTS THEN STOP SCREWING AROUND AND GET IT FIXED PROFESSIONALLY BEFORE YOU BURN YOUR HOUSE DOWN.

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