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Changing plug on dryer


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7 replies to this topic

#1 PebbleInHand

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:03 PM

I have a Kenmore Elite HE3 dryer.  I've had it for about 10 years.  At one point I had to replace a fuse in it as a dime had made its way into the interior and caused a bit of a mess when it arced.  But other than that is had been working fine.  I've recently moved it from the basement to the 2nd floor.  The second floor has an outlet that used to have an electric stove.  It is also three prong as was the one in the basement but one of the prongs has an L-shape which worked in the basement outlet but will not fit on the 2nd floor. 

 

What is the best approach?  I could pull the old outlet from the basement and rewire in place of the existing one on the second floor.  Or is it easier to get a different plug and replace the existing one on the dryer to match up to the outlet on the second floor?

 

thanks



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#2 Strathy

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:49 PM

Do it properly and change the outlet in the wall.
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#3 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 05:12 PM

And change the House Fuse / Circuit Breaker from 50 A to 30 A

New electrical code may now require a 4-wire Outlet and Cord


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#4 jkirksey1889

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:56 PM

What size wire is in the basement where the electric stove used to be?  How many wires, 3 or 4?  Copper or aluminum?



#5 jkirksey1889

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:59 PM

Do it properly and change the outlet in the wall.

Be careful with this.  What if it's aluminum wire and he uses an outlet that is not rated for aluminum?  What if the wire size is too big for the rating of a 30a dryer outlet? 



#6 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 07:06 PM

...  What if the wire size is too big for the rating of a 30a dryer outlet? 

that's not a problem

Just make sure the Fuse / Circuit Breaker is not too big for a 30A Dryer


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#7 jkirksey1889

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 08:40 AM

that's not a problem

Just make sure the Fuse / Circuit Breaker is not too big for a 30A Dryer

Not sure I've ever tried getting a #6 aluminum wire under the lugs of a 30 amp dryer receptacle.  Maybe it's not an issue, unless the dryer receptacle is not rated for aluminum wire.  But without trying it I was thinking the wire may be too large to fit.


Edited by jkirksey1889, 08 February 2013 - 09:03 AM.


#8 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 08:47 AM

Be careful with this.  What if it's aluminum wire and he uses an outlet that is not rated for aluminum?  

 

 

Wisdom!  Let us attend!  

 

If the outlet is not rated for aluminum, then you will create a burnt/loose connection or fire hazard down the road.  The problem with aluminum in these connections is that shrinks over time and creates a loose/arcing connection.  I see this alot in older homes around here with copper aluminum splices that aren't done properly and the resulting loose connection blows out the main relay on the relay board of a Dacor range.  That's the most innocuous case.  In this case-- using aluminum in a non-AL rated dryer outlet could cause a fire down the road.  






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