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Kenmore 665.16912001 Dishwasher Overflows Through Float

dishwasher

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22 replies to this topic

#1 jonesbasf

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 11:16 AM

Recently, I got my dishwasher back up and running by replacing the Door Switch and the Thermal Fuse (link to that topic).  However, now the dishwasher overflows with water running out from around the float.  It seems to be ok if I catch it and turn off the water supply as it begins to leak, but then I have to do the same for the rinse cycle.

 

I am wondering:

 

1) Could this be a bad control board, where it is not listening to the float switch?

2) Could this be a bad float switch (same as the door switch, no?)

3) Could this be something completely different?

 

Any and all help is appreciated.

 

Brad



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#2 telefunkenu47

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 12:09 PM

either the float switch isnt opening or the water valve is stuck open. can you test the float switch? how bout the shaft of the float itself, is it full of gookus? does it go clicky clicky when you move the float up and down?does the float move freely?



PS.. the float switch is only a ;limit device. the fill level is a timed fill only. 45 seconds if memory serves....


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#3 Chat_in_FL

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 12:33 PM

Part number: 9741998

Part number: 9741998

Make sure the standpipe nut is not loose, will leak if loose.


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#4 jonesbasf

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:15 PM

All, I think I have figured out at least part of the problem. I can run the dishwasher "successfully" if I turn off the water supply at minute 39 and 25 of a 45 Quick Wash. Also, at the end of the wash, there is invariably water in the bottom of the washer.

My thought is that for some reason, the pump is not able to pump out the water at the rate that it believes it should, and therefore the timing is all off. What I mean by this is that overflow is caused by the inflow of water for the upcoming sub-cycle (e.g. rinse), because not all the water from the previous cycle has been evacuated.

I have checked the topside and other that a little gookus (no more that you would expect) I did not find anything in before the chopper. At some point soon, I am going to pull the dishwasher (again... :sad: ) and check the pump and line.

Any other thoughts on what I should check or what could be going on would be greatly appreciated.

Brad

Edited by jonesbasf, 09 March 2013 - 12:19 PM.


#5 jonesbasf

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 03:31 PM

Ok.  An update.  


I have removed everything and checked for blockage.  I find nothing.  However, when I ran the dishwasher with it pulled out from under the cabinet, I did notice a kind of rattle/grinding noise during each drain.  The noise is definitely coming from the drain pump.  Would this be indicative of a bad drain pump? If so, any way to prove it before I order a new one?

 

Brad



#6 jonesbasf

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 04:51 PM

Another update...

 

Took apart drain pump.  Water was in the impeller magnet area, which I think was making the noise.  Cleaned out and resealed (need to replace seal obviously) and now no noise from drain pump.  

 

On another hunch, I ran just a rinse cycle.  Still overflows.  Even with the overflow switch (which I have tested for continuity and found to be good) manually engaged (safely). I notice that the fill never stops running.  So, I am beginning to thing this is either a bad fill switch, which never turns off, or a bad timer on the board, which never turns off. I am going to now test the fill switch.  If it is "always on", then it is a bad switch.  If it is not, it must be a bad board.

 

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

 

Brad



#7 dimitri77565

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 07:01 PM

What are you doing??????        

if the water keeps filling up & the only way to stop it is to turn water valve off THEN its your "water Inlet valve"

 

also as its filling open door if water keeps coming in its your water inlet valve

 

if it stops check your float switch not same as door switch.

 

Dont know your model but most DW leave water in the bottom (well area) or (sump area) to keep seals dry,

 

There is always water in the pump housing & drain pump.



#8 Scottthewolf

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 07:57 PM

Dont know your model but most DW leave water in the bottom (well area) or (sump area) to keep seals dry,

 

To keep seals DRY?  Obviously you mean wet.


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#9 nomoney

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 10:09 PM

The float switch is what determines the water level. It will rise up and shut off the water. If you have left over water from a previous cycle, the float should stop the fill before it overflows.

If the valve is stuck open, it will continue to fill when the door is open.

From what you describe it sounds like the float is sticking or the stem that hits the switch is damaged. Pull the float completely out of the machine and see if it still fills. If so, your switch actuator is either misaligned or jammed in the wrong position.

If it does not fill, check to see if the shaft on the float looks broken or bent. Also make sure it will move easily up and down without any trouble.

Senpal is right. Dishwashers always have a little water in the tub at the end of cycle. 2 reasons: keep seals wet and prevent sewer gasses from backing into dishwasher.



#10 nomoney

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 10:12 PM

Just thought of another thing. What kind of TILT is on the dishwasher. It should have about 10 to 15 degree tilt back otherwise water piles up in front, spray arm agitates it and causes leaks.

Just a thought. Dont realy think this is your trouble but worth mentioning anyway.



#11 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 08:19 AM

I have to dispel a couple of misconceptions here before they confuse the issue and lead our Apprentice astray:

 

The float switch is what determines the water level. It will rise up and shut off the water.

 

This is incorrect.  The water charge into the basin is controlled by the timer program on the control board; it is a timed fill.  The float switch is there as a safety device incase the valve relay on the control board sticks closed or the valve sticks open.  

 

Just thought of another thing. What kind of TILT is on the dishwasher. It should have about 10 to 15 degree tilt back otherwise water piles up in front, spray arm agitates it and causes leaks.

 

10 to 15 degrees is far too much tilt and will cause washability problems, wash pump starving and cavitation, and incomplete pumpouts.  The dishwasher should be roughly level, front to back and side to side. 



#12 nomoney

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 10:11 AM

I have to dispel a couple of misconceptions here before they confuse the issue and lead our Apprentice astray:

 

 

This is incorrect.  The water charge into the basin is controlled by the timer program on the control board; it is a timed fill.  The float switch is there as a safety device incase the valve relay on the control board sticks closed or the valve sticks open.  

 

 

10 to 15 degrees is far too much tilt and will cause washability problems, wash pump starving and cavitation, and incomplete pumpouts.  The dishwasher should be roughly level, front to back and side to side. 

I stand corrected.  I stated that wrong. The fill IS timed and the float IS there for a failsafe to prevent overfilling. Sometimes things just dont come out right.



#13 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 10:41 AM

Ain't no thang, mah bruvah, we all have days like that.  I know I've had my share-- just ask any of the long-timers here.   :cool:



#14 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 11:40 AM

... just ask any of the long-timers here. :cool:

:whistling:


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#15 reelynyceguy

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 04:05 PM

I concur with the Samurai, jonebasf. The water fill is timed. The float switch is an emergency back-up device to shut off the water if the timer fails. You can't rely solely on the float switch to shut off the water each time the machine fills: that's not it's job. It's the job of the timer to determine the proper water level. Therefore, sounds like you need a new timer. I'd also check out that float switch...appears it's not shutting off water either because the switch itself is faulty, or not aligned correctly with the standpipe as previously mentioned.


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#16 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 06:52 PM

OR the previous water is not fully drained


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#17 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 06:26 AM

This is incorrect.  The water charge into the basin is controlled by the timer program on the control board; it is a timed fill.  The float switch is there as a safety device incase the valve relay on the control board sticks closed or the valve sticks open.  

 

Samurai, would you care to explain to me how the float switch works as a safety device when "the valve sticks open"? :wub: :wub:


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#18 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 08:05 AM

No.

What's your next question?

#19 telefunkenu47

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 06:43 PM

So did you test the float switch and float assy or what?


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#20 Vets Appliance

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 06:58 PM

<--- Old electronics and appliance fart...

 

1) If you manually press the float switch and the fill valve keeps filling you are down to 2 culprits. Most likely is a sticky fill valve that may or may not settle down a while after power is removed. The other is a bad float switch that's shorted no matter what the lever does.

 

To know the difference do this easy test. Start the washer and listen for the hissing sound of water flowing in. After ten seconds of that open the door. This will cut power from the control board to the valve. If the valve shuts off immediately then it's the switch. If the valve take anything more than two seconds to stop then replace the valve.

 

2) In my experience both the time fill and float fill theories are actually right. I was told by a factory area rep that almost all dishwashers are set to fill for an amount of time that will put the right amount of water in the unit at the lowest reasonable water pressure for a home. However, since not all water pressure levels are equal, they also added the float so that when it floats up the switch will open and kill power to the valve if the water pressure in the home is good enough to fill the unit faster. This allows a unit to fill to the same level regardless of the water pressure in the home.


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