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AlexM

Amana Refrigerator Model# SQD26VE, Only 106-vac getting to evap fan

18 posts in this topic

This unit is not keeping cool, the evap fan is not running but when I put 120vac to the fan, i can get it to run strong.  there is only 106vac being supplied to the fan, the outlet is correct polarity and 120vac and the power cord into the unit checks good as well.

 

When I advance the defrost timer to defrost, I can't feel or see any heat from the heater, but yet it doesn't seem like defrost is the issue.  I assume that the frost starting to form on top of the evap is from a non functioning fan?

 

I feel that if I could get 120vac the fan, all would be fixed?

 

Has anybody experienced this before?

 

Thanks

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I don't have a wiring diagram for that model, but other Amana models.
Amana wires the Evaporator Fan in series with the Defrost Heater.....
When the Defrost circuit kicks in, it technically "shorts" across the Evaporator Fan and sends the full 120v to the Defrost Heater.
During non-Defrost, the Evaporator Fan would normally receive about 106v, and should still run.
Check voltage across the Defrost Heater, you may find the "missing" 14v.
Sounds like a bad Evaporator Fan Motor.
http://www.repairclinic.com/referral.asp?R=154&N=1089

 

Evaporator-Fan-Motor-10513803-00790712.j

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could the 'bad' evap fan be causing the heater not to kick on during defrost? or vise versa?  (I really don't know what I'm saying...)



I'm still learing about electricity, but how would I check for voltage across the heater?  If i unplug the heater and put the leads on each wire, will i read any voltage?  Don't I need to measure voltage across a load?  I might be confused.

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could the 'bad' evap fan be causing the heater not to kick on during defrost?

no,

correction on the previous voltages ..

There should maybe be only "missing" 2v across the Defrost Heater.. (and 118v at the Fan Motor)

The higher voltage could be from the "defective" Evaporator Fan now drawing more current than normal..

Check the voltage across the Defrost Heater ..

OR possibly a defective Defrost Bi-Metal thermal Switch

(should be 0v across)

http://www.repairclinic.com/referral.asp?R=154&N=992

 

Defrost-Thermostat-R0161088-00627670.jpg

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Ok, I am very fluent in non-electricalese so

if the limit is connected to the fan, which is common on older amanas and neither heater nor fan is working then pretty good bet it is a bad/open limit. You can test this by cutting limit out and connecting the wires that were once attached to the limit together. Then put fridge in defrost. If fan and heater works, attach new limit and call it a day. Yeah you can do a continuity test of the limit without cutting it out, but the method I described is meter-less and you can splice a limit back in place in no time flat.

ps if you replace the limit assembly as described by Sensei Reg, make sure you take pictures of how the original wires are connected. I didn't do this when I was a rookie and faced this setup for the first time, I assumed connections would only fit one way.... I finally got it right, after my second trip. Non-electricalians Unite!

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Good news...I cut out the limit and wired them together and it worked, thanks!

 

I don't want to overthink this but is there a way to buy a limit without the wire harness, and I assume this limit actually opens when it reaches tempurature and shuts off the heater?

 

So in other words, it would be ill advised to use a different limit than the one specified?

 

thanks.

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no,

correction on the previous voltages ..

There should maybe be only "missing" 2v across the Defrost Heater.. (and 118v at the Fan Motor)

The higher voltage could be from the "defective" Evaporator Fan now drawing more current than normal..

Check the voltage across the Defrost Heater ..

OR possibly a defective Defrost Bi-Metal thermal Switch

(should be 0v across)

http://www.repairclinic.com/referral.asp?R=154&N=992

 

Defrost-Thermostat-R0161088-00627670.jpg

I'm with Reg on this one... only because we had this part go bad, on one of these Amana's today... It was getting voltage to the fan but the Neutral wasn't getting through it because it had gotten water inside of it and expanded.  It's a cheap part, and we carry 3 or so in the van.  Changed it out, easy squezzy. Going good like gold.

 

Check the voltage on the other side of the thermostat. 

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Good news...I cut out the limit and wired them together and it worked, thanks!

 

I don't want to overthink this but is there a way to buy a limit without the wire harness, and I assume this limit actually opens when it reaches tempurature and shuts off the heater?

 

So in other words, it would be ill advised to use a different limit than the one specified?

 

thanks.

 

You want to use one that has similar properties as the old thermostat.  Opening the circuit and closing it near the same temps as the old one is better.  I wouldn't put one in that opens the circuit at a higher temp. If the temp has to fall 5 or 10 degrees more than the factory part before it will close again, it is not as big of a deal.  

 

Of course this head ache could be saved by using the factory part.   :whistling:

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Will do, thanks.

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You can never go wrong with factory parts. This situation is a tough call. If you have one of the factory parts on your truck, definitely use it. If not, use a good compatible limit since you would lose money if you have to order the part, especially if it would take several days to get it. That would mean, removing all the food and shelves again and possibly defrosting fridge with your steamer once again. For such an inexpensive part, you don't want to do that.. not cost effective. I've had no problem using reliable compatible limits. However, I will always order the factory limit to have one on my truck for the next call that uses that limit. Especially if it has a wire harness attachment like the one on this fridge.

Also while you are there, pull out your meter and quickly do some self-edumafacation. Test for continuity of stuff and voltage for other stuff. This is how we learn (I'm gonna get a chance to play around with a recent model Samsung today and do some unnecessary testing in the midst of repairing it). Remember, your fan will not come on until the limit closes. I use to wait for the fan motor just to make sure I made all the proper connections. But as I got better at understanding how that fridge works, I became confident enough to leave before the fan engages and make a follow up phone call a day later.

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I have a can of Key Board cleaner I carry in my tool bag. I turn it upside down and give the Defrost Tstat a quick liquid shot to verify. I am a worrier!!!!!!  I have to know for sure! You have the two test jump ports on the harness but I like the cleaner, it's COOOL!! Plus I use it for other crap ! 

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Great tip, Brother TTH!

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I have a can of Key Board cleaner I carry in my tool bag. I turn it upside down and give the Defrost Tstat a quick liquid shot to verify. I am a worrier!!!!!! I have to know for sure! You have the two test jump ports on the harness but I like the cleaner, it's COOOL!! Plus I use it for other crap !

now stuff like that is what makes my wife jealous. Such a great tip just adds to my undying love of this site.

Me: "Honey, Yeah, you caught me. I'm logged on Appliantolgy, once again. It's not like I'm on a porn site or something"

Mrs Durham Appliance :" I'd rather you go back to the porn sites. You spent a whole lot less time online then. Now go mow the lawn."

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... It's not like I'm on a porn site or something

you can learn alot from those sites ...

(so I've heard)

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Ok, I don't understand what the key board cleaner does? Super cools the tstat to get it to Open or Close? 

 

This will be a fantastic tip, once I understand what the F its supposed to do...

 

I do really like the concept of testing stuff that you know is functioning while doing repairs, great tip!

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The keyboard cleaner works just like the freon in a spray can for cooling electronic components on circuit boards to find failing components from overheating.

 

Turning the can up side down sprays out the liquid which will be super cold, (If up right in the normal position you just get cold air - not cold enough to freeze/close the defrost terminator t-stat).

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thanks, i will try it.

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This thread all came together on Friday when I put the new limit in and wanted to test it, as the evap fan didn't kick on right away.  Next time I will have a can of key board cleaner.  After about 15 minutes the fan kicked on, good to go.

 

Thanks to this website, I was saved from replacing fans, heaters, and other parts that wouldn't have fixed it, THANKS FOR THE HELP!

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