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Seal system problems


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7 replies to this topic

#1 Tone Blair

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 01:05 AM

I was working on a fridge the other day, it wasnt cooling, the condenser was filthy, so i cleaned it.
I pulled the evap cover off and there was a build up of ice around where the cap tube enters the evap tube.
My question is, is this caused by a freon leak? Is it a restriction? I see this a lot and i know its a seal system problem, but i would like to know more specifically.
Thanks!

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#2 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 04:23 AM

http://fixitnow.com/...job-case-study/


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#3 jkirksey1889

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 03:36 PM

From link above:

 

It is illegal to simply add refrigerant to a refrigeration system that has leaked without locating and repairing the source of the leak because the refrigerant will simply leak back out into the environment.

 

 

I do not think it's illegal to charge any appliance that holds less than 50 lbs of refrigerant and not fix the leak.  It may be dumb and a quick "temporary" fix with that cannot be warrantied, but I do not think it's illegal.  The appliance must hold more than 50 lbs of refrigerant and lose some percentage of a charge per year before the EPA requires the leak to be repaired. 

 

http://www.epa.gov/o...6/608/leak.html


Edited by jkirksey1889, 29 May 2013 - 04:04 PM.


#4 applianceman97

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 05:51 PM

Im almost posative you must fix the leak. Even if you dont have to fix the leak, that is not the correct repair. The refrigerant will slowly leak and have the same problem in the future.

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#5 jkirksey1889

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 05:58 PM

Im almost posative you must fix the leak. Even if you dont have to fix the leak, that is not the correct repair. The refrigerant will slowly leak and have the same problem in the future.

 

My argument, not really arguing, isn't whether or not it is the correct repair.  I'm simply pointing out that the EPA doesn't care if you fix it or not.  Well maybe they care, but they do not require it to be repaired. 

 

The leak repair requirements, promulgated under Section 608 of the Clean Air Act, require that when an owner or operator of an appliance that normally contains a refrigerant charge of more than 50 pounds discovers that refrigerant is leaking at a rate that would exceed the applicable trigger rate during a 12-month period, the owner or operator must take corrective action.



#6 Tone Blair

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 06:30 PM

So, thats what i suspected, i never recommend repairing the seal system. I was just wondering if it were a leak or restriction. Thanks everyone!

#7 JJ Surfer

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 03:41 AM

Usually it's low on freon, check amp draw on compressor a system low on freon should have a low amp draw (.2-.4amps). Also you can restart a compressor that's low on freon in a short period of time without tripping overload, a restricted system would take longer. Without tapping into the system and checking pressures you can't know for sure

#8 jumptrout

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 01:42 PM

Check the filter drier.

If it is cold or iced you have a restriction.

If not,you have a defective compressor or a refrigerant leak.






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