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Kenmore 110.62802101 Dryer - Doesnt start


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12 replies to this topic

#1 jmm

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 05:42 AM

Dryer was working last night - wont start this morning. Checked breakers - theyre fine - light bulb in interior is working. The push switch feels a little sticky. Any suggestions on where to start diagnostics? Thanks.



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#2 jumptrout

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 05:54 AM

Disconnect the power cord.

Remove the rear panel.

Locate the fuse in this picture.

If it reads open on your ohm meter.replace it..


Edited by jumptrout, 03 June 2013 - 05:56 AM.


#3 jumptrout

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 05:57 AM

http://www.repaircli...er=110.62802101



#4 jmm

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 06:34 AM

Thanks - I will try that tonight - can you post the picture to locate the fuse?



#5 jmm

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 07:57 AM

Oops - got it - didnt see the "Part Replacement" tab at first. Thanks!



#6 jmm

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 12:20 PM

OK - so I checked the thermal fuse on its bad. I went to the local appliance parts shop and the guy there said to also check the element for continuity - the coils could stretch over time and contact the housing. Is there a video for how to check this out? He also said that if the coils were OK, I should change out the thermostat at the same time as doing the thermal fuse. Sounds reasonable to me but I'm far from fluent in this - but does it make sense to the experts?



#7 jumptrout

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 02:52 PM

Personally, I would eplace the thermal fuse then run the dryer.

If it heats you are OK.

If it does not heat then you check and replace other parts.

There is a thermal limiter that comes as a set in the hi limit thermostat kit.

There is no reason to replace it because of a blown thermal fuse.



P.S. the thermal fuse is blewn because of resticted air flow in the duct system.

find and fix the air restriction.



#8 PDuff

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 05:31 PM

Concur with Brother jumptrout.  Might also check heater element for short to ground (chassis).  Check element leads for continuity lead to lead and check for grounding lead to chassis.  Should not have continuity to ground.  This would allow the element to pick up voltage from the neutral ground and cause it to heat, even when not running, as long as the timer knob is in the on position.  This along with exhaust vent restriction would cause the blower thermal to blow.



#9 jmm

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 07:01 PM

Thanks guys - I checked the heater element for short as suggested - no short - and cleaned out the exhaust vent. I'll pick up a new thermal fuse tomorrow and go from there.



#10 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 07:02 PM

Dryer Vent 4" diameter

Vent should be rigid metal.
Short lengths of flexible metal may be OK, if not crimped when moving the Dryer into place.
NO plastic
NO PVC
NO screws
Foil Duct Tape is OK.
With an empty load, Timed Dry, High Heat, the vent temperature should cycle somewhere between 135F and 160F
Check / clean the Dryer Vent
Disconnect the Dryer Vent and check for good air-flow there and where it exits the house.
Check the Vent air temperature at the back of the Dryer.

If you have a Harbor Freight Store near you,
 $ 3.99 sometimes on sale for $ 2.99
image_1255.jpg


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#11 JJ Surfer

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 10:17 AM

A bad operating t-stat can cause the thermal fuse to blow, per RegUs test that it cycles temperatures properly. I like to verify it is cycling on operating t-stat by measuring voltage on both sides of the op t-stat. When it's calling for heat there is no voltage when the t-stat opens you should have 240 volts.

#12 jumptrout

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 12:21 PM

 When it's calling for heat there is no voltage when the t-stat opens you should have 240 volts.

I was born and raised in the South.

Genetically,I am slow to understand things.

Would you please re-type this statement more slowly so that I can understand it.



#13 vee8power

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 07:24 PM

When a switch is closed there won't be voltage across it. Like a live wire with two uninsulated spots an inch apart, there wouldn't be any any voltage between those spots unless there was some resistance between them. An open switch has infinite resistance, so assuming all the other switches and loads in the circuit have continuity, voltage will feed through all of them except the open one; so there will be your voltage.






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