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topperdude

Small puddle at bottom of washer (Bosch WFMC3301UC/03)

15 posts in this topic

Hi,

 

I am trying to figure out the likely cause of a small puddle of water at the bottom of our washer. We are still able to do laundry and the washer does not give any error codes (searching on the internet, the most common one seems to be E:04?) yet.

 

What I have observed:

1. During the Spin cycle, I can notice water dripping very slowly (entire 9 minute spin cycle, I noticed three drops of water dripping from under the washer from somewhere closer to the front of the washer).

 

2. Sometimes, it takes awhile before we notice a puddle. For instance, we finished the last (of 5) loads yesterday evening (around 7-8pm) but I did not notice a puddle till mid morning today. Its possible water could be still dripping and we only see it when there's enough to form a pool that starts flowing to the front of the washer but just wanted to mention it if it might help narrow down the problem. 

3. Visual inspection and running my hand along the hoses at the back of washer indicates the hoses might be fine.

 

Having read various similar articles on the Internet as well as

(esp for the Patented Wet Vac Technique) by SamuraiRepairman, I wonder if it could be an issue with the washer not draining completely - which could in turn be caused by stuck debris as shown in above video? What could be some other causes of this?

 

Thanks for any input,

-Topper

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

from previous experience, these units are notorious for hairline cracks in the inlet valves...remove the screws holding the top panel and slide off to observe...even if this is not the source of the leak, you need to do this to see if you can see the source.

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Thanks for the replies and suggestionst! 

 

Based on the suggestions, if it is an inlet valve malfunction issue, I have turned off the water supply hoping it will cut down the water pooling below the washer (I am guessing there might still be some leakage from water already in the washer)?

 

Thoughts?

Thanks again,

-Topper

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Also, is removing and replacing the inlet valve straightforward?

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Turning off the water supply is a good test.  

 

As for replacement, this is Bosch laundry, the most famous over-engineered and under-performing laundry equipment ever conceived by man or beast.  Nothing is straight forward on these.  But it's not too bad,  the manual lays it our pretty clearly:  http://appliantology.org/files/file/72-bosch-wfmc-front-load-washer-training-manual-1st-edition/

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Turning off the water supply is a good test.  

 

As for replacement, this is Bosch laundry, the most famous over-engineered and under-performing laundry equipment ever conceived by man or beast.  Nothing is straight forward on these.  But it's not too bad,  the manual lays it our pretty clearly:  http://appliantology.org/files/file/72-bosch-wfmc-front-load-washer-training-manual-1st-edition/

Few minutes after turning off the water supply, it looked like there was still some water dripping - possibly whatever was already in the washer and/or hoses? When I checked this morning, after the water supply was off for ~4-5hrs, and did not notice any water dripping or puddle that had flowed out to the front of the washer. There used to be a spot on the floor at the back of the washer, almost directly under where the hoses connect to the inlet valves that used to look "damp" (while water was puddling in the front), This spot was also dry this morning.

 

So does this basically confirm that it is the valve as originally suggested/suspected? Also if its the valve that needs replacing, I am wondering how I might confirm whether its the cold water valve or the hot water or both? 

 

This morning, after confirming that the dripping had stopped (or atleast reduced), I turned on the supply for the hot water about half way (not completely as it was originally) and plan to check in couple hours whether the dripping has resumed. If not, that would seem to narrow it down to the cold water valve needing replacement. On the other hand, if dripping resumed then it would seem atleast the hot water valve would need to be replaced?

 

In either case, even if one valve is identified as defective, would it be advisable to replace both (or wait for the other one to fail before replacing)? I mean, if one failed now and based on KurtiusInterupptus post above, if the valves were notorius for failing, would the other one fail sooner if not later? Also, as KurtiusInterupptus mentioned, if the valves had a history of failing, are the replacement valves (that we might put in now) also susceptible to the same potential issue and expect to fail at some point OR do the replacement valves "fix" whatever design flaw the original valves had that makes them less susceptible to fail?

 

Just trying to get better understanding/confirmation before I place the order for the parts.

 

Thanks again!

 

-Topper

 

P.S. Used to love the Kirin Ichiban (when I used to consume alcholol many many moons ago in the Golden State). Some friends (big fans of the brew) mentioned they noticed change in taste over the years - not sure if that's true or if it could be due to change in their own tastes and wanting to try something different? :-) Any thoughts? 

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still advise to remove the top panel and feast your peepers on the valve asm.

tun water back on, of course...any doubt should be removed by the sight of the fine mist spray coming from the offending valve...not sure if a pre-emptive strike on the still -continent valve is prudent...your call.

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still advise to remove the top panel and feast your peepers on the valve asm.

tun water back on, of course...any doubt should be removed by the sight of the fine mist spray coming from the offending valve...not sure if a pre-emptive strike on the still -continent valve is prudent...your call.

As I mentioned in my previous post, I went back and checked the area under and around washer after the hot water supply had been turned on (halfway) for a few hours. Didnt notice anything different than in the morning.

 

I was in the process of removing the "torx" head screw on the back to pull off the top panel but ran out of time and had to rush back. One thing I did notice was as I was removing the screw holding the top in place, when the screw was almost out, I heard a "pop" sound - is this normal?

 

Still hoping to go back later and confirm the valve leak after taking off the top panel - but that will most likely be later in the evening after all the "routine" stuff is done (work, take kids to after school classes, dinner etc :-) ) but just wanted to check if its normal to hear the "pop" sound while removing the screw or if I might have been doing something incorrectly?

 

Thanks again,

-Topper

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Not sure about what you may have heard...

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Not sure about what you may have heard...

OK - no worries... It sounded like a metallic "twang" like something metallic might have been "over-tighthened" and loosening the screw may have freed it.... or for example the top panel could have been "pressed down" due to things like Tide container sitting on it for too long and loosening the screw let the top panel "flex" back into shape?

 

Was just checking to make sure I wasnt doing anything incorrectly but I suppose there's not too many ways to loosen the two screws to take off the top panel... :)

 

Thanks for the super-prompt reply as always,

-Topper

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still advise to remove the top panel and feast your peepers on the valve asm.

tun water back on, of course...any doubt should be removed by the sight of the fine mist spray coming from the offending valve...not sure if a pre-emptive strike on the still -continent valve is prudent...your call.

While the fine mist spray was thankfully missing, attached is proof that you gentlemen are awesome!! :imnotworthy:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/34430060@N03/9022144796/

 

Time to place the order for the replacement part.

 

Thanks again,

-Topper

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Nice shootin' ,Topper!

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Turning off the water supply is a good test.  

 

As for replacement, this is Bosch laundry, the most famous over-engineered and under-performing laundry equipment ever conceived by man or beast.  Nothing is straight forward on these.  But it's not too bad,  the manual lays it our pretty clearly:  http://appliantology.org/files/file/72-bosch-wfmc-front-load-washer-training-manual-1st-edition/

 

OK - so I placed the order through repairclinic.com and went through the manual linked above (didnt save it partly thinking I could access it on the website whenever I needed to before getting the message and realizing there's a "daily limit" - dang, should have read the details re apprentice membership bit closely). :sad:

 

Anyways, going through that manual, I recall seeing only one page that specifically talked about Disassembling the inlet valves with a note saying something along the lines "dont break the plastic pieces while removing or replacing the inlet valves". However, it didnt have steps on HOW one would remove the valves without breaking any of the plastic pieces of the inlet valves - which got me wondering whether there was a different manual that listed that information (and partly why I didnt save it)?

 

If there isnt a Bosch document outlining these steps, I would appreciate if you gentlemen might share any pro tips from your experience (as well as tools I would need to use) to ensure the removal and reinstall of the inlet valve goes through without incident.

 

Thank you,

-Topper

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I'll let my buddy, Rory, show the basic idea:  

 

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