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Pinhole in Frigidaire outer tub


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5 replies to this topic

#1 kathyplumb

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 12:33 AM

Hi!

 

A drywall screw caused a tiny pinhole leak in the bottom of my upright Frigidaire outer tub.  I called JB Weld and they did not recommend any of their products because they feared the tub was made of polyethlyene.  3M told me the same thing.  I can't tell fiberglass from polyethylene.

 

I stumbled upon Slap Stix but unfortunately the pinhole is right next to a protruding tab so there isn't a flat space all the way around it, so I assume that wouldn't work.

 

I'm hoping to find a product to repair the hole from the outside without having to remove the inner tub  to get to the inside.

 

Any suggestions for proven remedies?  I'm a chick, but I'm handy!



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#2 kathyplumb

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 12:46 AM

P.S.  The plastic ID symbol on bottom of the tub is a 7.  It says, "PP-T22" underneath.  I guess that stands for polypropylene...



#3 beam current

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 01:57 AM

There's a product I use to tape around the AC air handler access panel.  It is 2" wide and comes in a 25 foot roll. NOT the plain, thin sticky foil tape. This stuff is about 1/8 inch thick.  I don't know the exact name for it, but any AC parts house should carry it. Not sure if HD or Lowes has it.

 

It has a silver backing and an extremely strong adhesive sealer on it (probably water proof for a pinhole size leak).  Very flexible and you can cut to fit. Just make sure surface is clean and dry before applying the tape.

 

Hope this helps.


I think this will work. I once saw it on a cartoon.

Or, on the other hand.....

Troubleshooting the appliance's complex electro-mechanical systems is the methodology in which one must, by using analyitical techniques and the process of elimination, determine the cause or causes of a specific failure. Rarely does this cause of a failure directly present itself for you to see.

So.....

To be better equipped to troubleshoot, you will need:

1.) To follow this: Safety first and foremost. Trust your instincts.
2.) Basic hand tools.
3.) A decent DVOM meter. Buy one. Borrow one. You need one.
4.) Last, but certainty not least, common sense. Most of us have it. Slow down and use it.

Now, let's have some fun!

ZIG:
Hope is the power that gives a person the confidence to step out and try.
Success is the maximum utilization of the ability you have.

N.M.:
It always seems impossible until it's done.

#4 nickfixit

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 05:21 AM

I would use epoxy. Clean the area, rough it up with some sand paper, clean it again, then make your epoxy patch. You could even remove the basket, and patch it from the inside too. I've used JB weld and Loctite brand epoxies with no issues.


" Giving numerical data to Sears management is like giving a monkey a machine gun. No one knows for certain what will happen, but you can be sure of two things... It will be real messy, and only the monkey will be unharmed"

#5 kathyplumb

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 02:58 PM

Thanks much. Good to know



#6 kathyplumb

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 03:45 PM

Looky here.  Says it structurally bonds polypropylene!    1 oz $14.95

 

TAP Poly-Weld Adhesive

TAP Poly-Weld Adhesive: Imagine being able to structurally bond Polyethylene!!! This has been virtually impossible in the past. Now, with a simple flame treatment and Poly-Weld, one can create strong joints on Low, Medium, or High Density Polyethylene. Use for tank, door, pipe, irrigation, pond, marine, float, & automotive body repairs. Also bonds polypropylene, ABS, PVC, ceramics, rubber, fiberglass, metals, and glass. Exterior-rated. Non-sag formula.

 

http://www.tapplasti...ld_adhesive/435






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