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To water cool a R22 residential condenser or not


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5 replies to this topic

#1 rolandvz71

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 11:19 PM

I have read where using water on a condenser will lower in the inside temp @ the vents as mush as 4-6 degrees!

 

I have ALSO read to only use tap water to clean the condenser coils, not to use them in the cooling process all the time. Lime scale build up that will occur and cause poor heat transfer.....I get that......

 

So how about running a single line over the compressor dome say w/a misting jet to help cool the refrigerant before it enters the evaporator?

 

One can run a water line w/a auto valve solenoid and tie it into the motor stater contractor.....when the unit is on the valve opens and unit shuts off the valve closes. Only direct water on the top of compressor......will this be a good idea?

 

How about the evaporator condensed water (condensate) gravity feed from the unit in the attic (my case) down to the condenser compressor dome.....is that a good idea???

 

I see this on Youtube all the time....Techs charging a unit pouring water on top of  the compressor to speed up the charging process......well how about do this all the time.....especially during the summer

 

Any thoughts??



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#2 jb8103

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 07:51 PM

You can try it, I suppose. Shouldn't do any more harm than the rain. Use condenser coil cleaner on it on a regular basis. The cleaner is acidic and corrosive so rinse thoroughly.


First, do no harm.

#3 tpoindexter

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 09:34 PM



Test

#4 tpoindexter

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 09:43 PM

My favorite

http://www.mistcooli...CFWxyQgodd08AaA


Test

#5 Cactus Bob

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 10:09 PM

where do you live ?

what part of the country ?


SORRY ABOUT THE SPELLING , I FIX GREAT , I DON'T SPELL WELL

#6 CvW

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 12:16 PM

FWIW, I saw the effects from a local university B&G team rigging the same kind of unit modification to enable a condenser unit to cool a space on the hottest days only. Quite interesting to see just how much of the finwork of the outdoor HX vaporized in the process. My guess is that the water here is a bit acidic, so every sprinkler run caused the topmost metal oxide layer to wash off followed by a new one forming. Given how little material is in your average condenser fin...

 

In other words, unless you have a coil made for such a modification, I'd stay away from doing so. Carrier used to offer Cu/Cu coils for example (seaside applications, dog-infested areas, etc.)






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