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OK to combine dryer vent with room ceiling fan?


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5 replies to this topic

#1 PEvans

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 01:25 PM

My dryer is in the middle of a house with masonry (adobe) walls and presently vents to the garage, which is a mess. Venting to an outside wall would be preferable but impossible.

 

There is a ceiling fan for the laundry and I am tempted to route the dryer vent up and through the same roof vent. The ducting is large (at least 4"). This would avoid a new penetration in the roof membrane.

 

Does anyone know if this is allowed/prohibited by code and whether it is a good/bad idea?

 

 



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#2 DurhamAppliance

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 02:59 PM

How are you going to prevent back flow from dryer to the fan or vice versa for that matter? Having lint blown from the dryer through the fan may be quite dusty and having the fan blowing lint back into your dryer may be quite... uh... smokey.

A suggestion to live by : Never play around with your dryer or its venting.

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#3 nickfixit

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 04:39 PM

A ceiling fan or a room exhaust fan? A ceiling fan normally doesn't have any duct line.


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#4 PEvans

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 05:15 PM

It's a room exhaust fan with a duct through the attic to a vent in the roof.

 

Great point on backdraft.



#5 Cactus Bob

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 06:43 PM

Is it , can you do this or should you do it ?

 

you can do anything , but ..........

 

most bathroom vents have a cap on the roof , this cap has a screen , you would not want it to get clogged with lint , and it will

 

for years bathroom vents just ran up into the attic and ended there , the problem was the little motors went bad and the motors would overheat , and burn, next thing you knew was you had an attic fire . so they started requiring an outside metal vent so if something did go wrong your house would not burn down

 

so your plan is to "t" the two together , so loose lint can fall down into a hot bathroom fan motor !  not cool !!

 

so if it was mine , i would disconect the bathroom vent , disconect the electric to the fan motor and run the vent into the hard vent pipe (NO , T CONNECTOR)  go up on the roof and remove any screen in the cap and make sure the cap is big enough to handle the volume of air the dryer puts out

then in a month or so go back up and see how the vent is doing , any lint buildup ect.

 

the downside is you no longer have a bathroom vent and you need to keep an eye on that cap on the roof for lint buldup every so offten

 

 

if you ever list your house for sale , please put things back the way it should be , otherwise someone sometime will be talking about your "great handywork " 


 

SORRY ABOUT THE SPELLING , I FIX GREAT , I DON'T SPELL WELL

#6 micabay

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 08:44 AM

The longer any dryer run is the more likly it will become a fire hazard in the near future. Over 75% of our dryer service calls are directly related to a clogged dryer vent. The safest thing you can do is to move your laundry room to an outside wall.




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