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How to Test the Evaporator and Condenser Fan Motors in a GE Refrigerator with a 9-volt battery

GE refrigerator fan motor battery test 9 volt hot wire

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30 replies to this topic

#1 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 07:54 PM

In today's excursion into appliance repair esoterica, The Appliance Guru shows you how to use a 9-volt battery to hot wire the evaporator (freezer) and condenser (in the compressor compartment) fan motors so you test 'em and see if they'll run.  Why would you want to do this?  Ah, grasshoppah, watch and learn!  
 
 
Here's the muthaboard I replaced in this refrigerator to fix it:  http://www.repaircli...5X10942/1531075


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#2 DurhamAppliance

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 07:34 AM

great video as usual. I had a bad board last week and a dead 9 volt battery. Unlike the one in your video, my dispenser board was still working so out of necessity I finally tried the "voltage stealing" technique I saw in training. I used the + and - pins for the dispenser at the j4 connector like you used the 9 volt battery. Worked like a charm

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#3 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 08:00 AM

Good job applying training tricks to a repair in the field!  The voltage stealing method may even be a little neater to wire in.  



#4 DurhamAppliance

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 08:38 AM

Next time I get a fubared GE, I gonna take off the j4 connector with as much wire as possible. Then crimp some probes on the wires corresponding to 12v dc + and -... and tada! Introducing "Durham's Magic GE Jumping Jig" get yours today... $39.99 or buy two for the low low pice of $99.99. patent and general common sense pending.

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#5 telefunkenu47

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 08:57 PM

Just pay separate shipping and handling!... 


Even root canal is easy...if you're a dentist...

#6 DurhamAppliance

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 07:16 AM

Just pay separate shipping and handling!...

No problem mate:

Separately ordered units require a shipping and handling fee of $20.02 each. So if you order two separately, you total cost would be $120.02. If you order them together, your total cost would be the low low price of $120.01


ps Good try though. I guess i forgot to tell you my sales and marketing department personnel were trained in Nigeria. This just in.... they said you may be interested in this new offer... "10 % off if you pay by credit card and verify it by providing your SSN." They are now telling me to offer another 10% if you also provide your birth date and an additional 20% if you provide your mother's maiden name with it. I tell ya, I just love those guys. They really know how to offer great bargains.

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#7 wishfultech

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 08:26 PM

After having my info hacked by #1 my home state #2 my employer, I don't feel very secure anymore.



#8 frunch

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 03:45 PM

How many pins are on the J4 connector? I believe those pins are 0.156 pins, which are very common on modern pinball machines (a hobby of mine). I can get replacement connectors (they're cheap) and make up some harnesses for doing this test, just need to know which pins will need wires (and how many pins the connector is) and I can make some up. If anyone wants to send me that info I'll see what I can come up with.

Trevor



#9 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 09:54 AM

How many pins are on the J4 connector? 

 

 

J4 is a 5-pin connector.  You can count all the connectors in the illustrative images below (click for larger view):

 

gallery_4_4_340323.jpg

 

 

gallery_4_4_163965.jpg



#10 frunch

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 01:34 AM

Cool, so I'd just need to make a 5-pin connector with a wire for the 13vdc at pin 2 and a wire for the ground at pin 3, I suppose? What should go on the other end of each of those 2 wires? I guess the wires could have any number of adapters spliced to the end of them in order to stuff them into the other connector...

This is a really neat trick, thanks for sharing, Samurai!

That's a handy diagram of the muthaboard too! Gonna save that one for future reference...



#11 Radio Loco

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 05:16 PM



great video as usual. I had a bad board last week and a dead 9 volt battery. Unlike the one in your video, my dispenser board was still working so out of necessity I finally tried the "voltage stealing" technique I saw in training. I used the + and - pins for the dispenser at the j4 connector like you used the 9 volt battery. Worked like a charm

 

Would this not work also?

Philmore Multi-Voltage Regulated DC Power Supply : MW122A

 

DCPowerSupply_zps2172e21c.jpg

 



  • Multi-Voltage Output: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.5, 9, 12VDC; 110/120VAC Input

  • Provides constant current from 0-2000mA

  • Short circuit protection

  • Automatic thermal cutoff and overload protection

  • 3-3/4" wide x 5-1/4" long x 2-5/8" high; Weighs 2 lbs 14 oz.

 

Plus it's slightly bigger than a deck of cards.  It's like having your test bench in your tool bag.  Up to 2A should be sufficient.

 

Gonna git me one!  $32 clams @ Amazon.


I think this will work. I once saw it on a cartoon.

Or, on the other hand.....

Troubleshooting the appliance's complex electro-mechanical systems is the methodology in which one must, by using analyitical techniques and the process of elimination, determine the cause or causes of a specific failure. Rarely does this cause of a failure directly present itself for you to see.

So.....

To be better equipped to troubleshoot, you will need:

1.) To follow this: Safety first and foremost. Trust your instincts.
2.) Basic hand tools.
3.) A decent DVOM meter. Buy one. Borrow one. You need one.
4.) Last, but certainty not least, common sense. Most of us have it. Slow down and use it.

Now, let's have some fun!

ZIG:
Hope is the power that gives a person the confidence to step out and try.
Success is the maximum utilization of the ability you have.

N.M.:
It always seems impossible until it's done.

#12 DurhamAppliance

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 06:37 PM

wow, that's small. At first I thought it was too big but the size of a deck of cards? .. gotta get me one.

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#13 acfixerdude

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 02:54 AM

Wonder what size leads it takes... some people are complaining that the standard banana style leads are too big.



#14 Radio Loco

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 05:07 AM

Standard banana leads fit fine.  Actually, nice and tight.  Use my Pomona test leads - no problem.  Could also use ring or fork terminals.

 

This will probably be larger than you would care to carry around if you have a smaller tool bag, but I will now have it in the truck when needed.

 

The output voltages were within + 0.15 vdc on all positions.  Nice power supply.  Glad I got it.


I think this will work. I once saw it on a cartoon.

Or, on the other hand.....

Troubleshooting the appliance's complex electro-mechanical systems is the methodology in which one must, by using analyitical techniques and the process of elimination, determine the cause or causes of a specific failure. Rarely does this cause of a failure directly present itself for you to see.

So.....

To be better equipped to troubleshoot, you will need:

1.) To follow this: Safety first and foremost. Trust your instincts.
2.) Basic hand tools.
3.) A decent DVOM meter. Buy one. Borrow one. You need one.
4.) Last, but certainty not least, common sense. Most of us have it. Slow down and use it.

Now, let's have some fun!

ZIG:
Hope is the power that gives a person the confidence to step out and try.
Success is the maximum utilization of the ability you have.

N.M.:
It always seems impossible until it's done.

#15 tonytech81

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 11:19 PM

Or you can use a universal ac,dc adaptor by transonic and put some lead on it cut the end and adapt some lead to it and it small

#16 tonytech81

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 11:55 PM

This dc adapter cheater cord I made is great for any dc application in most dishwashers and refrigerators and is less than 10$ to make u will need a cheap harbor freight meter for 5$ to take the cables leads of it and a cheap ac,dc universal wall adapter withe the selection from 1.5vdc to 12 Vdc grab the lead from the harbor freight meter and cut the end of it then cut the ends of the dc adapter and adapt the meter leads to the ac adapter red to white and black to black and u got a awesome cheater dc tester for all those Sam,lg and other appliances that have dc parts that would required a 9v battery for testing

#17 acfixerdude

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 10:47 PM

Link for the variable dc wall adapter?



#18 tonytech81

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 11:43 PM

Just search for the brand trisonic wall adapter universal

#19 allen63

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Posted 24 September 2014 - 09:52 PM

The red wire is power going in and the white wire is common. The yellow wire is also another source of power to the
motor? Why would the fan motor require 9 volts from 2 wires at the same time? Can someone enlighten me. Thank You.

#20 DurhamAppliance

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Posted 25 September 2014 - 07:03 AM

The red wire is power going in and the white wire is common. The yellow wire is also another source of power to themotor? Why would the fan motor require 9 volts from 2 wires at the same time? Can someone enlighten me. Thank You.

I'm so glad you asked that question. It gives us one more chance to understand what's going on with these fridges and maybe get a peek inside the warped mind of an appliance engineer. But be careful, because doing so can lead to insanity... but luckily not in this case.

Ok, here goes.... Remember these dc fan motors have built-in circuitry (does things like count rpms etc to be sent back to the board on the blue wire). It receives the dc voltage from the board to energize the previously mentioned circuit then receives a signal to tell it how fast to turn. So you need power to energize the circuitry. then you need power to control the speed.

Oh, I hear ya thinking... "can't it use the same 12v power to do both?"

Most certainly! But we want our fan to do something special... we want an analog fan to perform variable speeds. So to do that efficiently, we add another line designed only to provide power to the fan motor and we incorporate something cool... Pulse width modulation!


Analog fan motors such as these can efficiently be made into a variable speed motor by "pulsing" the voltage to it. Faster pulse, faster fan. Since analog fan motors take time to turn and stop, the pulsing still allows the fan to run smoothly. Cool, huh? I wished I'd thought of it first... oh well.

Anyway, the board on these models controls the pulsing on the yellow wire. The circuitry on the fan is energized on the red wire and both circuits uses the white as neutral. Of course your 9v battery isn't pulsing but it is close enough in power to 12vdc to serve our purposes for testing.

Edited by DurhamAppliance, 25 September 2014 - 07:22 AM.

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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: GE, refrigerator, fan motor, battery, test, 9 volt, hot wire

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