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Selling used units, OMG! are you serious?


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34 replies to this topic

#21 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 01:31 AM

... If you buy special connectors, get me a name and source so I can see the difference.

high temperature connectors
such as
http://www.repaircli...?R=154&N=240986
Quarter-Inch-Female-Terminal-Ends-T1112-


.

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#22 acfixerdude

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 04:48 AM

I am cutting my teeth and grinding them down as well.  My tounge is almost knawed in half for I have had to bite it numerous times as I try to deal with some customers.

 

Guy wants a 90 day warranty, money back if the compressor should blow on a used freezer, selling price 200.00 a 20 cubic.

 

First I had to buy it with no guarntee it worked at all, or I could fix it.  New ones cost over 500-.  Mr if you want a warranty for the parts I did not make, you need to dig into more 100 dollar bills. 150.00 dollars is what I will sell a washer for and it has a 200.00 control board, 150.00 dollar motor.

 

I tell them I give them a 30 day labor warranty.

 

Guy takes dryer home, calls me back says dryer doesnt work,  will I come out and fix it, No sir unless you want to pay my service charge fee.  What's it doing, nothing he says,  When you push the on button nothing happens, he says what on switch?  Then I tell him where the switch is.  He says it did not come on .  Ok you need to bring it back to me, at my shop. (This is now my rule or policy)  He brings it to me and I plug it in it works.  He has a 220 outlet problem.  Thats why I dont do free service calls on units that worked fine in my shop.

 

Had a guy call me on washer, one week later lives 30 miles away, I tried to explain what to look for, he brings it back, they have broke the lid switch, I by pass it, dont charge him, should have but did not.  How did that happen??

 

Then there are the traders, can I trade in my broke freezer, for your working one, will you give me 50.00 for my broke one.  NO I say, If I want to gamble money I'll go to the casino and pull a one arm bandit.  Oh will you take 50.00 off your price.

 

I have found that I need to ask for 250.00 if I think its worth 200.00

 

Dryers here are not valuable, they are 100.00 in the minds.  If you have a washer but no dryer what is the most important part of your laundry equipment.  Can you wear wet clothes, who said a dryer is not worth 150.00.  New ones cost 400.00  go figure.

 

Before you think you can give a warranty on a machine, I say lightning strike, or electrical surge.  Can you control that.  No and I wont insure your machine, the manufacture has already dropped its coverage and I guess you now want me to pick up the tab.  Friends I do my very best to check them out, and get you a good used unit, but I am not God, nor am I a predictor of the future.  It's used, its a machime and like your car it can and will someday break.

 

I am trying to keep a calm cool attitude on the phone or in person, but I tell you its not easy.

 

Told a customer I needed cash flow, to pay bills and he thought he could go for the throat and get 50.00 off.  I told him sir I said I needed cash, but not desperiate for money, I have a great unit, and its priced right,  Go buy Billy Bobs smaller unit.

 

 

Chime in here if you sell used units.  I may need some help here.

 

 

Did you say you bypassed a lid switch for a customer? Dude...   :nono:



#23 DurhamAppliance

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 08:24 AM

Lots of money can be made in the used appliance business. If you are looking at your margin because of one failed unit, either you aren't selling enough or you anticipate more problems which suggests a quality control issue. Our return or follow up rate is less than 1 percent on our used appliances. Our only problem is customer demand exceeds our supply.

Do you really think you are in a position to give such a general statement and advise others to avoid it since you personally cannot or have not made money in the limited time you've been in the business? To that I have to simply say, speak for yourself.

Furthermore, as Acfixerdude correctly points out, if you are bypassing lid switches for customers, you have to seriously re-evaluate many assumptions you have made about appliance repair and used appliance sales.

Edited by DurhamAppliance, 28 December 2013 - 11:34 AM.

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www.DurhamApplianceThrift.com


#24 applianceman97

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 01:36 PM

My business has been running for over 30 years and have been selling strictly used appliances since we opened. We also do service of course. It now supports 2 full family's with just me and my wife working. A lot of money can be made selling used. More profit that new. It's all in how you run your business. You have not been in business long enough to give advice on this subject. We have been trying to give you advice and it seems you do not listen. Maybe you should re evaluate what your doing. Remember if it's done correctly you can make great money doing this. (Correctly does not include bypassing lid switches)

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#25 curjones

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 08:15 PM

Sorry if I am giving wrong advice, need advice and trying to sort out some things.  I did not have a lid switch and the guy had no children in the home. Not the way I wanted to do it, but he lives 30 miles away, and was ok with the no lid switch.  I have been able to get a few in stock. 

 

It has been a bumpy start, and that is what I am trying to  express, I have a high strung side to me and trying to calm down a bit.  Your straight forward  replies are noted  I need to know if I am the one being unreasonable or is the customer.  I have had some customers bring me used units, because i went back out.  That makes me think different about people as well.  It is a bumpy road, still trying to get a shop, store with electricity, get parts learn.

 

It's not easy, fear and frustriation creep in and I have to get it out, or as some said here get out of this business, which I don't want to do.  I very seldom will cut any corners.  I've starting telling myself th be more like Daniel Boone if I feel like someone is sticking a kentucy long rifle in my belly stay calm and stay focused.  Do it right or not at all.  Thanks for your help ..



#26 curjones

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 08:57 PM

Appliance War Stories
If you're a consumer, post your horror stories of dealings with jive turkey repairmen, parts changing monkeys, or manufacturer bureaucracy. If you're a professional servicer, post your war stories dealing with cheesedork customers or repairing the appliance from Hell.

 

Some times I am one or many of these, and I know at times there is a war going on inside me, and outside with people as we try to do business. We all learn from war and some of the training is not fun either.  Discipline and keeping it together..
 



#27 john63

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 09:22 PM

<<<Do yall buy a special style of connector, for  heater element connectors>>>

 

**********

 

During the 80s---I was using High Temperature electrical connectors (installed with a crimp tool).

 

Too often in a high-heat/heavy-electrical-load application---the replacement connector failed again (these were clean connections/not in partially-burnt condition). This was especially true on Bake Elements in which the element and the wire connectors were both *new*.

 

For last 20 years now---I've been saving any and all *good* wire connectors from appliances that were being discarded.

All colors and sizes. Each is cut 6 to 8 inches away from the connection.

 

Nothing beats the original factory crimp on the connector & wire.

 

If a Whirlpool dryer has a failed High Limit Thermostat---A new thermostat will be installed and 6 inches of old wiring is removed (along with the burnt connector). After installing the "new" section of wire (with either a ceramic or plastic wire nut,depending on need)---it's good to go:)


Edited by john63, 23 January 2014 - 09:32 PM.

To eliminate:

Musty odor

L-O-N-G cycle times

Dingy/yellowing whites

Suds error message

Slow spin speeds

Intermittent water leaks (from rear of washer)

And other annoying symptoms which vary brand-to brand.

Read below:

The *correct* amount of HE (High Efficiency) detergent that should be used in any front load or agitatorless top load washer with tub sizes 3.0 cu ft and larger is as follows:

HE: (2) Tablespoons Per Wash Load

HE 2X: (1) Tablespoon

HE 3X: (1) Teaspoon

Perform a TUB CLEAN CYCLE every (4) months.

Use: "Tide Washing Machine Cleaner"

#28 applianceman97

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 09:30 PM

<<<Do yall buy a special style of connector, for heater element connectors>>>

**********

During the 80s---I was using High Temperature electrical connectors (installed with a crimp tool).

Too often in a high-heat/heavy-electrical-load application---the replacement connector failed again (these were clean connections/not in partially-burnt condition). This was especially true on Bake Elements in which the element and the wire connectors were both *new*.

For last 20 years now---I've been saving any and all *good* wire connectors from appliances that were being discarded.
All colors and sizes. Each is cut 6 to 8 inches away from the connection.

Nothing beats the original factory crimp on of the connector & wire.

If a Whirlpool dryer has a failed High Limit Thermostat---A new thermostat will be installed and 6 inches of old wiring is removed (along with the burnt connector). After installing the "new" section of wire (with either a ceramic or plastic wire nut,depending on need)---it's good to go:)


Good tip!

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#29 john63

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:10 AM

<<<Sorry if I am giving wrong advice, need advice and trying to sort out some things.>>>

 

If you're a consumer, post your horror stories of dealings with jive turkey repairmen, parts changing monkeys, or manufacturer bureaucracy. If you're a professional servicer, post your war stories dealing with cheesedork customers or repairing the appliance from Hell.

 

<<<Some times I am one or many of these>>>

 

 

**********

 

Don't make a mountain out of a mole hill, curjones:)

 

I've made mistakes---plenty of them.

 

Is it a good idea to disconnect the (safety) lid switch on a washer?   No.

 

Always correct any aspect of your service/repair---when you find/discover that something's not right.

 

I'd make an effort to go to that customer's home and install either a used or new Lid Switch Assy---as soon as reasonably possible.

 

Tell the customer this...

 

"I frequently chat with other professional colleagues on Appliantology.Org---and they've educated me about the need to maintain the integrity of any and all safety-related components on appliances that I sell or service"

"Which is why I'd like to offer this lid switch installation---free of charge."


To eliminate:

Musty odor

L-O-N-G cycle times

Dingy/yellowing whites

Suds error message

Slow spin speeds

Intermittent water leaks (from rear of washer)

And other annoying symptoms which vary brand-to brand.

Read below:

The *correct* amount of HE (High Efficiency) detergent that should be used in any front load or agitatorless top load washer with tub sizes 3.0 cu ft and larger is as follows:

HE: (2) Tablespoons Per Wash Load

HE 2X: (1) Tablespoon

HE 3X: (1) Teaspoon

Perform a TUB CLEAN CYCLE every (4) months.

Use: "Tide Washing Machine Cleaner"

#30 curjones

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:37 PM

Thanks John good advice. I was coming back to the post to find wire connectors again. I have a oven with a bad connector terminal, I bought some hig temp terminals, but they dont have the tab that secures the insulation, (strain relief) on the terminal. I was wondering if I shold apply solder to the joint as well to eliminate a loose fit.

I actually try as much as I can, when I can, to do it perfect. Some little job like a termnial crimp may not seem like that big of a deal. In many cases its not, low heat, not going to be exposed, a simple crimp, non insulated terminal is ok.
High heat, cant use a cheap terminal and cant use an ordinary wire, or insulated terminal, the insulation will burn off.

Terminals exposed to touch, or elements like water, need insulation or sheilding or barrier.

Have had a problem with the bad connector that the manufacture used on the Cabrio washer at the pump. Used it again thinking I could make the blades hit the wire correctly, two months later he brings it back the wire is broke again in the connector, (factory) I used insulated crimp connectors, on the pump, and the pump also has a shied or cover over that connection.

Special crimp tool.. I have wondered if there is one for these high temp terminals. I have seen crimps made on standard terminals, with a cheap crimper and they dont hold up. I use kline tools or better to make a good crimp.

I believe Samuria even has a lesson here somewhere on what is a good crimp.

It will take me less than two minutes to put on a terminal, but I have spent several hours looking locally for the right terminal, I have looked on line for better ones. The ones that someone posted from repair clinic are the ones I got from DC wire, they dont have the extra tab either, so I question, stop, and look for better, the right way to do it. I have yet to fix this simple stove problem. I have time I am waiting on a burner to come in.

#31 curjones

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:57 PM

And I hear you on the tip, to keep good wires on hand, from old units. The wire at a loose connection is often burned inside the insulation. Making another connection back six inches eliminates the bad wire. It does create another connection spot, which electricians are taught to try and eliminate, or reduce as much as possible. I have seen where a wire nut was put on and the connection was not right and that became the new problem area.

I'm running this through my head here, use the wire nut, Do you use a cermic high heat nut or standard insulated one.
??. I have had trouble getting some of the cermic to hold the wires in a kit supplied, they may have been cheap ones.

I have made it a practice to tape the wire nut connections after I have visually looked inside at the connection and pulled both wires to make sure it wont seperate.

Tape on an oven connection, like under the range top would not be a good idea, standard tape would likely burn. I'm thinking that the use of the cermic tape would be ok? Use it on the cermic wire nuts, is that correct thinking.

I dont think I have any old stove wires around so I'll have to try and do a good crimp. thanks

#32 -Mike-

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 08:36 PM


Have had a problem with the bad connector that the manufacture used on the Cabrio washer at the pump. Used it again thinking I could make the blades hit the wire correctly, two months later he brings it back the wire is broke again in the connector, (factory) I used insulated crimp connectors, on the pump, and the pump also has a shied or cover over that connection.

Did you have the wires clipped in to the hook on the pump? Because if you didn't it will break the wire at the connector. Ask me how I know....



#33 curjones

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 08:09 PM

 Mike, wire was back in the hook,  I need to take a picture and post that connector, it has four forks, two for each wire, top and bottom. You put the wire in the holes and slide it in.  The forks are knife like, suppose to cut the insulation  and hold the wire in place.  I'm sure there is a technical name for the connector.

 

What it did was cut the wire, or did not get a good bite, and after you snap it back together you can not inspect it.  You pull on the wire and it is snug.  I found this the first time by Ohm ing out the wire, thought I had it back good.  Worked two months and it broke again.



#34 certified tech group 51

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 11:27 AM

If you are worried by using a 'plastic' wire nut on your connections....Quit worrying.........The Whirlpool dryer heater element  ( P/N 4391960) uses plastic nuts and 6 inch repair wire...........Now it is a 5200 watt element...The range element is appx..3000 watts..........Using Ohms law, you can figure the amps. used................A home wire 12 ga. is rated at 20 amps. and uses plastic nuts for their connections..........If worried about heat, cover with a "heat shrink"  insulator.......................John63 has the inside story, I carry a small selection of wire with connectors in various length and gauges...I use plastic wire nuts for the connectors...................... if real small.... I.E. oven sensors, I solder and use 'heat shrink'....



#35 curjones

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 10:34 PM

Then there is trying to find a crimper to do the flag terminals right..  I am going to look at some at my parts units and start getting the wires off them.  Thanks for the input. I have started saving some.






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