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Stinky Clothes - Thanks Whirlpool WFW9500TW01


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12 replies to this topic

#1 john Frank

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 04:42 PM

Since we purchased this piece of crap 4 years ago it's been crap.  The unit had the main washer basket bearing go out when it was 6 months old, thankfully the warranty covered that.  The unit stunk for quite some time, fixed that myself, but this post is for an ongoing issue.

 

Our towels stink.  It's kinda of a burlap or gunny sack smell.  It's though they aren't getting wet enough in either the wash or rinse cycles or both, to get them truly clean and/or rinsed.  Is there any way to adjust the water level?  I seen a youtube video where someone adjusted the levels on a 9550 model but mine is a little different under the hood.  Whirlpool will never get another dime from me.

 

Any idea's?/?  Thanks.  


I apologize, I omitted the fact that it's a front loading duet steam washer in case you all didn't know.  The smart people probably knew that but I'm not one of them so I wanted to adjust the comment, sorry for the confusion.

 



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#2 Spannerwrench

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 04:59 PM

Detergent type and amount? How often is a cleaner ran through the washer? Are closes taken out of machine right when it's finished? All of these are easy to correct and also causes most odors in front loaders. It's the nature of the beast.
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#3 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 05:04 PM

... The unit had the main washer basket bearing go out when it was 6 months old

... The unit stunk for quite some time, fixed that myself, but this post is for an ongoing issue.

Our towels stink.  It's kinda of a burlap or gunny sack smell. 

... Is there any way to adjust the water level?

1) have you only used HE detergent ?

 

2) have you used only HE detergent ?

AND leave the door slightly open after each cycle to allow for better ventilation and drying of washer interior.

AND use the CLEAN WASHER cycle once a month ?

 

3) no

 


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#4 john Frank

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 05:12 PM

I suppose it's natural to review the obvious solutions, assuming I'm at average or a little below average intelligence.  We can read.  I don't mean to sound sarcastic but many posts on many sites assume people don't read owner manuals.  We do use "HE" detergent.  My spouse has been doing laundry for 30 years and kinda has it down.  We run cleaning cycles with store bought products and occasionally vinegar.  We always prop the door open after user and always ensure the rubber gasket is dried off after use.

 

Again the smell is in the clothes, not the washer, it more like a dirty sock or burlap smell.  It's not a rotten egg smell like you find in many front load washers that don't drain completely.  I know that water will sit in a small collection areas below the drum.  I'm certain this is a water level issue.  I know in the interest of water and energy conservation the factory probably has this et pretty lean.  Can that level be manually adjusted, or does anyone know if it's all in the electronics?

 

Thanks.



#5 PDuff

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 05:26 PM

The absence of any displayed fault codes would seem to indicate that the control believes the washer is filling and draining properly.  It also indicates that the steamer components are working as designed.  Your model uses an analog style pressure switch which is flaky enough already, and no adjustment is possible.  You may want to check and clean the lint filter at the drain pump, located behind the bottom/front access panel.



#6 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 05:33 PM

9 Ways to Beat Odor Problems in Modern High-Efficiency Front Load and Top Load Washers

 

Read more: http://appliantology.../#ixzz2kTPjbsBC 
 



#7 micabay

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 07:50 PM

Powder soap, not liquid helps with odors.

Also, when the detergent container advertises 100 loads, you should be able to get 200 loads.  No really.  Which means, don't ever ever fill the detergent past the #1 line in your detergent measuring apparatus. In my experience, customers who have much more experience than I washing laundry, tend to continue to use too much detergent.  No matter what, we as techs, may say. The water to detergent ratio is to remain the same, or less as it was on the good ole fashion top loaders.  You use less water in H.E. machines, why wouldn't you also use less detergent? Which means you shouldn't ever need to fill past the #1 line 

Good luck!



#8 RegUS_PatOff

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 07:53 PM

what brand of detergent are you using ?

how much ?

 

 


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#9 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 08:01 PM

Powder soap, not liquid helps with odors.

 

 

 

Powder or liquid makes no difference.  Same chemistry.  

 

What does matter is the type and amount. 

 

HE detergent:  2 tablespoons

 

HEx2 (double concentrated): 1 tablespoon

 

HEx3: 1 teaspoon.  

 

The most HE detergent you should ever use, powder or liquid, is 2 tablespoons.  



#10 nickfixit

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 06:56 AM

I think this has to do with the enzyme based HE detergents. I have seen cases where the towels smell fine dry, but if you get it even slightly wet, you instantly get the musty smell similar to a used towel that spent the day inside a gym bag.

 

I would try...

 

1)switch to powdered detergent using the least amount that will clean your clothes

2)Try some of the new fragrance additives to see if they help

3)Set your dryer to more thoroughly dry the clothes

4)moderate your load sizes.. retailers tend to claim the machine will clean a bigger load than it actually can

5) check your drain hose to make sure it is not shoved so far into the standpipe that the end is under water

6)if draining into a sink, make sure the drain hose is not under water after unit drains 

 

I would switch to Tide HE powdered detergent and set your dryer to the "more dry" setting as a 1st step.  Items 5 and 6 are to prevent the machine from taking dirty water back into the wash by siphon action. The dryer comment is due to machines programmed to end cycle when clothes are just barely dry per Energy Star methods.

 

The best way to clean your machine...

 

Get a medium sized load of towels or cleaning cloths that you don't mind getting bleached out. Put bleach in the bleach dispenser , put towels in washer, add 1/2 cup powdered Cascade dishwasher detergent, run load on Sanitary cycle. If you have a sink near the washer, run hot water until it is good and hot, this will make the water charge into the machine hotter. 

 

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#11 DurhamAppliance

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 08:22 AM

Powder or liquid makes no difference.  Same chemistry.  
 
What does matter is the type and amount. 
 
HE detergent:  2 tablespoons
 
HEx2 (double concentrated): 1 tablespoon
 
HEx3: 1 teaspoon.  
 
The most HE detergent you should ever use, powder or liquid, is 2 tablespoons.


does this apply to all machines including classic WP top loaders?

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#12 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 09:26 AM

Just HE machines.  The classic top loaders are not HE.

 

According to the Whirlpool instructor at the latest USA RSM, liquid or powder HE detergent makes no difference-- they've studied this extensively.  What does matter is the proper amount by HE concentration.  

 

The number one problem that people don't seem to get is that they are using too much detergent, whether powdered or liquid.  Even if it is HE, too much will cause odor problems.  

 

FWIW, we've been using liquid HE detergent in our front loaders for the past 15 years and never had even a whiff of an odor or mildew issue.  But we have always implemented the 9 odor-beating techniques and always remove the clothes from the washer as soon as they're done. 

 

Pop quiz:

 

Q. What's the biggest single difference between HE and non-HE detergent (there are many but there's the one biggie)?  Give up?

 

A.  HE detergent has additives specifically to suppress sudsing because sudsing interferes with the mechanical action of removing soils from fabrics.  

 

Okay, here's another one:

 

Q.  What do most people like to see when they do laundry?

 

A.  SUDS!  Lots and lots of suds.  They open the lid or look through the glass and don't see suds, what do they do?  Yep:  add more detergent until they see suds.  Then they wonder why their clothes stink.  

 

Fun Fact to Know and Tell (FFTKAT): Detergent contains most of the necessary ingredients to support microbial life.  In other words, it's bug food.  What do bacteria do as they grow?  Like all life forms, they produce waste products.  Sometimes, this is a good thing, like in the case of making beer.  But other times, it's a bad thing, like in the case of stinky laundry.  

 

The detergent manufacturers are partly to blame here, too.  They put idiot directions on the label instructing the customer to use too much.  Supposedly, the usage instructions are based on a North American average of water hardness.  I'm not sure I believe that.  The amount they say to use would be appropriate for areas with extreme hard water.  For most areas, the amount on the label is three to four times too much and causes all kinds of problems, including odors and the infamous F35/sud error code...

 



#13 DADoESTX

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 10:21 AM

There's also the problem that the dosage measurement lines in the liquid detergent product caps are essentially *invisible*.

 

The consumer has no idea where is Line 1 or Line 2 ... so for lack of anything else they toss in an *entire capful*.






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