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GE Refrigerator Compressor Will Not Start


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17 replies to this topic

#1 GThree1

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 05:14 PM

GE refrig model #TBX24ZKB. Compressor will not start. I've checked resistance between prongs on compressor and all within spec. Also, checked for resistance from each prong to compressor housing and found none. (I scraped small spot of paint off compressor housing). Removed relay (old style, not solid state) and shook. No rattling noise. Neither the relay or Klixon look or smell burned. Evaporator fans runs fine when refrig is plugged in and turned on. Condensor fan starts for a couple of seconds and shuts off when compressor fails to start. Typical click sound is heard when compressor fails to start. Capacitor has oily residue on it's end where blade terminals are located. I tested capacitor with digital meter and readout shows capacitor absorbing a charge. What else can I check? Any suggestions much appreciated. 



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#2 DurhamAppliance

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 07:42 PM

the only option you have is to replace the relay. If that doesn't work then your compressor probably has a mechanical failure. btw what were your compressor readings?

Edited by DurhamAppliance, 28 December 2013 - 07:43 PM.

Appliantology is, however appliances are not, an exact science for I know there are a few refrigerators that actually hate me.

The simplest explanation is most likely the correct and least expensive one, unless it's your compressor or motherboard" Occam as an appliantologist

"When you have eliminated all the impossible, whatever remains, however implausible, must be the logic truth; unless it's your compressor or motherboard." Mr. Spock as an appliantologist

"I think, therefore I have no earthly idea why this thing is not working...I got nothin'...". Rumored to have been uttered by a frustrated Descartes while diagnosing his GE Profile.

#3 applianceman97

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 07:54 PM

Just because all the numbers add up during compressor check doesn't mean it's good. Just had one the other day that all tested good but still had a problem with the start windings. This may be your case. But as Durham suggested... You can try the relay.

#4 GThree1

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 07:55 PM

My compressor readings were as follows.

 

Common to start 4.9

Common to run 2.5

Start to run 6.7-7.3 fluctuated.

 

Your thoughts?

 

Thank you.

 

Can you tell me what part number(s) do I need to order?



#5 Wingerman

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 07:58 PM

When checking from each terminal to ground ( a short condition) don't forget to check on the highest meter setting (say Rx100 or M ohms if auto ranging meter) and work your way down to the lowest (say Rx1) ohm setting. Many times a short to ground will not be a "dead short" (Rx1) but will appear in the Mega ohm range. Shorts between windings often exhibit high resistance that the lowest meter setting will not catch.



#6 applianceman97

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 08:08 PM

Your start and run winding are bit far apart. This is what happened to me last week. Through me for a loop. Everything checked okay but the run windings being so far apart in resistance was causing an issue. Again trying a relay will tell you for sure.

#7 GThree1

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 08:11 PM

Just checked for short to ground as you suggested. Still found no resistance. I am using a Sperry DM-210A digital meter. There scale runs from 2M all the way down to 200.

 

Any other thoughts?

 

Thank you.



#8 GThree1

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 08:25 PM

Can you tell me the part number(s) I need to order?



#9 Wingerman

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 08:25 PM

As Durham and Applianceman have stated, the new relay is the best option. If it doesn't run then, mechanical lock or winding in balance are likely.



#10 GThree1

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 09:52 PM

What part number do I need to order? And, does the overload come with it or is it separate?



#11 -Mike-

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 10:15 PM

Unless your meter has a setting for checking capicators you can't be sure with these if its good or bad. And since you said it has an oily residue on it, I would replace it. That may be the whole problem here.



#12 GThree1

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 10:18 PM

Thanks Mike. Should I also replace the overload too?



#13 vee8power

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 10:20 PM

Relay

 

http://www.repaircli.../WR7X222/305859



#14 GThree1

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 10:23 PM

Thanks vee8power. Should I replace the overload too?



#15 -Mike-

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 10:39 PM

You could but since the compressor is trying to start and the overload is cutting it off the overload is probably fine. It wouldn't hurt to replace it but it's probably not needed. Now if the compressor is actually starting and running (and not just making a buzzing noise and attempting to start) then the overload cuts it off after a few seconds then that is likey to be a weak overload.  With that said keep in mind with your compressor  they can be difficult to tell if its actually running or if its only trying to start with an ear unfamiliar to their sound. Those old rotary compressors  kinds just make a humming noise when running.

If you have an amp meter  put it over the netural wire to the compressor and see how much power it pulls in the short time its on.


Edited by -Mike-, 28 December 2013 - 10:41 PM.


#16 GThree1

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 10:42 PM

Thanks Mike. Do you happen to know the overload part number? I am not finding it.



#17 vee8power

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 10:50 PM

By looking at the picture, it looks like that part is a relay/overload combination.



#18 GThree1

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 11:05 PM

vee8, since the original relay part number (AP2071942) has been superseded to WR7X222, that might well be the case. The present setup on this refrig is a relay with a separate Klixon overload that is wired to the common prong on the compressor.  






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