Jump to content



Learn appliance repair at the Samurai Tech Academy.  Learn more.  Earn more.


Parts Search
Site Search

FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Welcome to Appliantology.org, the Web's Premiere Appliance Repair Resource!

The world-famous Samurai Appliance Repair Forums


To get started, click here.


Already a member of the Appliantology Academy? Just sign in with your username and password in the upper right-hand corner of the screen.

 


Photo

oven thermometer


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 BryanS

BryanS

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:I don't drink

Posted 03 February 2014 - 06:32 PM

What do you guys use to measure an oven temperature and how? I see just regular analog ones online you could just set inside for pretty cheap.

Use the Appliantology Parts Search Box to Find What You Need!
Enter your model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

#2 applianceman97

applianceman97

    Baby Sensei

  • Grand Master Funk
  • 2,012 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Fresh Squeezed IPA

Posted 03 February 2014 - 08:57 PM

Oh boy. Now you have done it. Just wait for this. Durham has a way that is supposed work but the samurai says no. This will be a great argument. Let's get it on!!!

Kicks major Samsung booty first, asks diagnostic questions later.

http://www.justintimeappliance.com
 


#3 applianceman97

applianceman97

    Baby Sensei

  • Grand Master Funk
  • 2,012 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Fresh Squeezed IPA

Posted 03 February 2014 - 09:00 PM

Here is what I use.
http://www.ueitest.c...e-testers/dt221

Kicks major Samsung booty first, asks diagnostic questions later.

http://www.justintimeappliance.com
 


#4 BryanS

BryanS

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:I don't drink

Posted 03 February 2014 - 09:05 PM

Haha. I was just reading something in my book about calibrating some of the oven thermostats. So it had me thinking because sister has an older hot point stove, and she thinks it's getting hotter than the setting. It seems to burn the bottoms of stuff even with newer pans. I replaced her element a few years back due to the old burning out. A local appliance shop sold it to me before I even got into appliance repair. I figured that wouldn't cause the issue. The oven tstat is way to expensive. Over $100. I thought maybe this style might be able to be calibrated like my appliance book was referring too. :)
I thought Durham said somewhere he used the fluke 116 meter to check temps in the oven. I'm just not sure what probe would work in there.

#5 olyteddy

olyteddy

    Kohai

  • Sublime Master of Appliantology
  • PipPipPip
  • 352 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Earl Grey

Posted 03 February 2014 - 09:22 PM

I use my $60 Klein Multi Meter. It has a thermocouple and I set it in the middle of the oven. I use the Max/Min function of the meter and the range is generally 30 degrees. If that's the case I'll set it for 10 degrees below and 20 degrees above. 



#6 BryanS

BryanS

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:I don't drink

Posted 03 February 2014 - 09:29 PM

http://www.amazon.co...-6&pf_rd_t=1201

do you use a thermocouple like this? What do you just stick down in mid air and close the door? I have a probe like that for my Fluke

#7 -Mike-

-Mike-

    Kohai

  • Sublime Master of Appliantology
  • PipPipPip
  • 338 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:diet Pepsi

Posted 03 February 2014 - 09:49 PM

I have a Fluke 116 and a 117 and either one works great for oven temps. I'll put a bend in the thermocouple and hook it on the middle of the rack with the rack in the middle position being sure the bulb on the tip of the thermocouple is hanging in the air.

 

My process is to set the oven for 350 and let it cycle 3 or 5 times or untill the high and low temperatures are consistant then average them.



#8 BryanS

BryanS

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:I don't drink

Posted 03 February 2014 - 09:53 PM

Thanks Mike. I was hoping not to have to buy another tool. I may send my meter off for calibration sometime soon. It's 5 years old and I was getting some really off readings when checking fridge temps awhile back. I bought a new thermocouple and it still didn't help. My meter is in good shape though, so hopefully calibration doesn't cost to much.

#9 applianceman97

applianceman97

    Baby Sensei

  • Grand Master Funk
  • 2,012 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Fresh Squeezed IPA

Posted 03 February 2014 - 09:55 PM

Here is the issue with averaging temps like stated above. (I still do that though) you can't measure how long the oven was at that max or min temp. That also affects the average. If it is set for 350 climbs to 380 and stays there for way longer then when it drops you average may still say it's 350 but it's baking longer at the higher temp.
I have heard you can use a cast iron pan with an IR gun. Yes opening the door will let hot air escape but that cast iron pan stays at the same temp.

Kicks major Samsung booty first, asks diagnostic questions later.

http://www.justintimeappliance.com
 


#10 olyteddy

olyteddy

    Kohai

  • Sublime Master of Appliantology
  • PipPipPip
  • 352 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Earl Grey

Posted 03 February 2014 - 10:19 PM

You can check your thermocouple easily using water. Ice melting in water is 32 degrees, rolling boil 212 (at sea level).



#11 LLAMBERT

LLAMBERT

    Sōhei

  • Appliantologist
  • PipPipPip
  • 147 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Stone Ruination IPA

Posted 03 February 2014 - 10:53 PM

Poppin' Fresh method! Pillsbury biscuits help me prove to customers that their oven is, or is now calibrated properly. 400 degrees F 8 to twelve minutes iirc. Set oven, set timer, if they are done earlier than 8 minutes, too hot! Later than 12 minutes too cool. In this range most can be adjusted, If burnt before 8 minutes still not nearly done in 12 then they can not be adjusted....Parts needed.


Why? I came into this game for the action, the excitement. Go anywhere, travel light, get in, get out, wherever there's trouble, a man alone. Now they got the whole country sectioned off, you can't make a move without a form

#12 BryanS

BryanS

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:I don't drink

Posted 04 February 2014 - 02:37 AM

You can check your thermocouple easily using water. Ice melting in water is 32 degrees, rolling boil 212 (at sea level).


I did the ice water test and it was 32, but my probe was giving me a couple -25 to -30 readings in a couple freezers when other thermometers showed closer to 0. I knew the negative temps couldn't have been correct or drains would have been freezing up.

#13 Spannerwrench

Spannerwrench

    Senpai

  • Master Appliantologist
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 708 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Maxwell House > Black Crown > Crown Royal with Ginger Ale

Posted 04 February 2014 - 06:39 AM

I use two digital multimeters and average the two reading for cut-in cut-out temperatures. I let it preheat then cycle one and off once, then I average the next four highs and lows. This gives me a fairly accurate reading of the actual temperature of the cooking cavity. I have never had a complaint (well one, later). In my opinion it's the most accurate way to calibrate an oven. Most peoples problem is they put the the food in the oven right when the preheat chime goes off. We'll all that means is that the air is hot. You need to at least let the oven cycle on and off one more time to get the the entire oven cavity hot for proper baking.
The one complaint I had was a Whirlpool oven where the young lady was either burning or undercooking everything she attemted to bake. I measured the temperatures in the above method and they were right on. About a week later she called the office and said we needed to come back out the oven still wasn't cooking right and we had to find out what was wrong with it because her husband was going to divorce her over her cooking. We quoted her COD to come back out and check the oven. I brought some of the Pillsbury biscuits with me. This time the husband was at the house as well, he wanted to see the results. I let the oven preheat and the cycle on and off one time, put the biscuits in and they cooked perfectly according to the instructions on the can. She immediately started screaming that she didn't have the time to let the oven heat that long, I told her all the meals that I know of tell you to turn the oven on when you start the prep of the food, and besides it only took 18 minutes to preheat and cycle on and off once. I charged them the service call and for the biscuits and happily left.
About a week or two later she called back in blaming us because her husband was divorcing her.

But anyway here's a spreadsheet that I use for the calculations of the temperature, after the calibration I email a PDF copy along with the invoice to the customer. I also do believe the Samurai has a few good manuals on the subject be DACOR and Whirlpool in the downloads section.

https://www.dropbox....Calibration.htm
"Suds are not good"
"They write directions for a reason"
"Make sure you're using it right before you say it's not working correctly"
"If if has a Diagnostic Test Cycle, Run it before and after you fix it!"
"Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results is insane"
"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong."

#14 Radio Loco

Radio Loco

    Sōhei

  • Chief Appliantologist
  • PipPipPip
  • 234 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Ginger Ale. On the rocks.

Posted 04 February 2014 - 06:46 AM

http://www.amazon.co...-6&pf_rd_t=1201

do you use a thermocouple like this? What do you just stick down in mid air and close the door? I have a probe like that for my Fluke

 

This is my set-up:

 

Fieldpiece HS36 DVOM

 

Fieldpiece ATAF1 High Temp K-Type thermocouple with alligator clip. Temperature range: -50 to 900-Degree F


I think this will work. I once saw it on a cartoon.

Or, on the other hand.....

Troubleshooting the appliance's complex electro-mechanical systems is the methodology in which one must, by using analyitical techniques and the process of elimination, determine the cause or causes of a specific failure. Rarely does this cause of a failure directly present itself for you to see.

So.....

To be better equipped to troubleshoot, you will need:

1.) To follow this: Safety first and foremost. Trust your instincts.
2.) Basic hand tools.
3.) A decent DVOM meter. Buy one. Borrow one. You need one.
4.) Last, but certainty not least, common sense. Most of us have it. Slow down and use it.

Now, let's have some fun!

ZIG:
Hope is the power that gives a person the confidence to step out and try.
Success is the maximum utilization of the ability you have.

N.M.:
It always seems impossible until it's done.

#15 BryanS

BryanS

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:I don't drink

Posted 04 February 2014 - 09:29 AM

Lol spanner. My sister definitely isn't that dumb :) She knows how to cook properly. I think this stove is original to her trailer and it's like an 87 or so. Either way I see the point of the story. I'll keep that in mind with two thermometers.

#16 PDuff

PDuff

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,011 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Bud Ice (Yeah, I know)

Posted 05 February 2014 - 02:27 PM

True words of wisdom from Brother Spanner and LLAMBERT.  The biscuit method is highly recommended by the Bosch trainers and advised in a Kitchenaid Service Pointer.  As for what I use I carry a cheap Harbor Freight multimeter w/thermocouples (only reads Celsius) and a temp gun.  But what I normally use, since I am cheap, old and stubborn, is my good ole' flip type mercury oven thermometer.



#17 Spannerwrench

Spannerwrench

    Senpai

  • Master Appliantologist
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 708 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Maxwell House > Black Crown > Crown Royal with Ginger Ale

Posted 05 February 2014 - 03:03 PM

Yes, the biscuits work well to show the customer that the oven works. I've even cooked steaks and burgers on high end grills for customers to show them there's nothing wrong with the unit, just their techniques.
If I did a lot of them or worked in commercial cooking, I would get one of those Flukes that the Samurai has with dual probes. As for now I simply use the two separate meters, because I carry both of them in my tool box, so I can get different measurements in in different positions in the cavity. Also if one gets out of calibration it's easier to notice.
Measuring in different positions does help, there's a reason that DACOR uses multiple probes in their ovens and they probably also have the most accurate cooking you could get out of a residential cooking product.

O ya, what's Celsius? I prefer to measure in Kelvin.

Edited by Spannerwrench, 05 February 2014 - 03:05 PM.

"Suds are not good"
"They write directions for a reason"
"Make sure you're using it right before you say it's not working correctly"
"If if has a Diagnostic Test Cycle, Run it before and after you fix it!"
"Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results is insane"
"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong."

#18 olyteddy

olyteddy

    Kohai

  • Sublime Master of Appliantology
  • PipPipPip
  • 352 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Earl Grey

Posted 05 February 2014 - 09:43 PM

O ya, what's Celsius? I prefer to measure in Kelvin. 

 

Absolutely.



#19 J5

J5

    Senpai

  • Sublime Master of Appliantology
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 524 posts
  • Location: non-US or Canada

Posted 05 February 2014 - 10:38 PM

i have a multimeter that has a K type thermocouple which reminds me i need to replace it as its getting intermittant

which is great as you can say to customer here is the reading

 

i stick it into the racks so the tip is flying in the breeze

 

we use celcius so i set it 50, 100, 150,200 degrees

 

once at 200 i let it cycle on and off and check the cut in and out

 

from experience thermostats arent usually off and never adjust them , they are usually way off if there is a problem so replacement of

thermostat is the fix , but in the last 7 years i think i have only changed 1 maybe 2 for being out of range

 

things to remember is not all customers know how to cook as shown above in the baking comments

 

a knob thermostat isnt accurate set it for 200 , is it at 195 or 205 ? always slight differences

 

customers need to realise that you preheat to 20% higher than what you want to cook at as you lose all the temp when you open the door

and they need to let it cycle a couple of times to allow full cavity heating

 

a 10-15% tolerance on knob thermostats is pretty common , there was a thread the other day on fridge thermometers , you can buy oven thermometers

on ebay for about $3 , very useful things

 

something also worth knowing which i have seen int he past is the airvent for the cooling fan is either blocked with dust

or the oven hasnt been fitted correctly so the vent isnt getting air , this will screw up cavity temps and give mixed results across the tray of biscuits



#20 -Mike-

-Mike-

    Kohai

  • Sublime Master of Appliantology
  • PipPipPip
  • 338 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:diet Pepsi

Posted 06 February 2014 - 12:23 AM

Here is the issue with averaging temps like stated above. (I still do that though) you can't measure how long the oven was at that max or min temp. That also affects the average. If it is set for 350 climbs to 380 and stays there for way longer then when it drops you average may still say it's 350 but it's baking longer at the higher temp.
I have heard you can use a cast iron pan with an IR gun. Yes opening the door will let hot air escape but that cast iron pan stays at the same temp.

One thing I've done a few times, mostly just for fun and my own learning experience, is to tightly wrap the thermocouple bulb in foil duct tape right to the center of the rack. That way you're measuring the temperature of the rack...the average temperature of the oven. It takes an hour or so for everything to level out but even with 60-70 degree air temperature swings the temp of the oven rack only moves about 5 degreese.

 

Before you do that,  make sure you have some adhesive remover to clean the melted glue off the oven rack.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Use the Appliantology Parts Finder to Get What You Need!
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

Your Sometimes-Lucid Host:
Samurai Appliance Repair Man
"If I can't help you fix your appliance and make you 100% satisfied, I will come to your home and slice open my belly,
spilling my steaming entrails onto your floor."


The Appliance Guru | Master Samurai Tech

Real Time Analytics