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Wolf Double Oven Troubleshooting

Wolf Oven

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11 replies to this topic

#1 bmh

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 11:55 AM

Hi, I have a Wolf in-wall electric oven DO30F/S that is not heating up on the top oven during bake mode: baking takes 20 minutes to get to 150 degrees, also, broil doesn't work at all.  the bottom over seems to be working fine - so I thought.

 

So I acquired the service manual and went to troubleshooting.  I have found that the on-board diagnostics for continuity report that the upper inner bake element and broil element don't work, as well as the lower inner bake element.  So I went about testing - per the manual - the continuity from the output of the relay board.  From there I get both upper and lower inner bake elements have no continuity, but the upper broil DOES have continuity.

 

So, what do I conclude from this - that i need new bake elements for upper and lower, but that my broiler issues may stem from a non-functioning relay board or controller?  Something else?

 

I also have a question regarding the high-limit switch (or thermal limiter).  The diagnostics say the following:

 

"...if the technician DOES NOT get an ohm reading from the DLB lead to all of the element leads, then, there is a problem with the High Limit"

 

Now I took that to be a poorly worded statement saying that if ALL continuity tests fail - it might be the high limit - but if some work, it isn't.  My buddy helping me took that to mean that if ANY continuity tests fail then it may be the high limit.

 

We took it out of the equation by testing the continuity from output end of the high limit switch and got the exact same results as when it was included.  This tells me that there is no high limit issue.  But I could be wrong.  Can the high-limit cause only selected elements to fail?  I would think it was an all-or-nothing proposition.

 

Lastly, if it is new bake elements that are needed, where would I find those.

 

 

 

 

 



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#2 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 12:51 PM

So I went about testing - per the manual - the continuity from the output of the relay board. 

 

 

When you say you tested the "continuity from the output of the relay board" do you mean that you disconnected at least one of the wires from the relay board going to the elements under test and then did your continuity test from the correct wires?

 

 You would check the relay board by doing a live voltage test, checking to see if it is putting out the proper voltage to the elements that you're testing.

 

 Ohms testing is always done on a dead circuit and with the component under test removed from the circuit; voltage checking is always done on a live circuit and with the components all connected so that the circuit board being tested is under load.



#3 bmh

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 01:06 PM

Yes, I disconnected the high-limit return wire from the board, and then ohm-tested from each of the board's 6 different relay outputs to the wire that i disconnected from the board (not the board itself).  The results I got for the bake element were consistent with what the on-board diagnostics were reporting (bake elements not working) but were inconsistent for the upper broil (had continuity when manually tested but no circuit from the on-board diagnostics).  This is per the manual.  Is there a different/better way to do it?

 

i have not done anything under live power - what would be the procedure for testing the broil element?  I have the unit completely pulled out from the wall and I can access the two wires on the broil element from the back.  Of course, I don't want to electrocute myself...

 

Is my assumption correct that if there is no continuity to the bake elements, those are most likely needing replacement?



#4 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 01:13 PM

The rule with ohms testing is that something can test good on ohms and still be bad. But, if something tests bad on ohms, then it really is bad.

Assuming that you did the ohms testing on the elements correctly, then the elements are indeed bad. However, I find it suspicious that two elements would go out at the same time. I would doublecheck the circuit diagram to ensure that there's not another overload in the circuit for those elements that may be causing you to read open and then conclude that both the elements are bad.

As far as how to do live testing, there really is no substitute for just reading the circuit diagram and then knowing where to make your measurements with your meter. I show how to do this on a couple of different other appliances in the two videos below:

 

 



#5 bmh

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 01:23 PM

Thank you for the videos.

 

From my other question - is the high/thermal overload switch something that would apply to all elements in a single oven, or can it just impact a few of the elements?  Since parts of my ovens are working fine, I assumed it would not be part of the problem, but that's why I'm here...to get better advice.

 

Thanks again!



#6 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 01:25 PM

 

From my other question - is the high/thermal overload switch something that would apply to all elements in a single oven, or can it just impact a few of the elements?  

 

 

Here again, the circuit diagram tells the story.  What does it show in the circuits for these elements?



#7 bmh

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 02:20 PM

Well, not an expert in reading these things, but from the screenshot below it looks like it should impact all elements (DLB is the high-temp-cutoff connection to the relay board).

 

 

DO30FS wiring


#8 bmh

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 03:53 PM

Since I have the back off,  I found the upper/lower4-pin connectors (by reading the wiring diagram) that feed each dual bake element.  Sure enough, the inner element of each failed continuity.  From the diagram I see nothing else connected, these wires feed the elements directly.  So my assumption is those are bad. 



#9 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 03:57 PM

I see at least two thermal cutouts but would need to see a much bigger version of the diagram in order to tell what these cutouts affected.

 

But you can also tell this yourself by simply looking at the diagram and following the lines to see what elements are affected by those thermal cutouts.  There's no magic here: if you can read a roadmap, you can read a wiring diagram. A wiring diagram is just a roadmap for electrons. Just pay attention to the little symbols, which would be equivalent to signs on the road.



#10 woftam

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 04:55 PM

There is two thermal cut outs. One for each oven. If cut out is open it will disable all elements in that oven. Sounds like both bake elements are bad and maybe upper oven relay board. These all have five year part warranty. Is there foil or any type of liner on floor of oven? This will reflect too much heat back down on elements and cause them to burn out.
There is a huge difference between 10 years experience and one years experience ten times over.

#11 bmh

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 05:54 PM

Thanks.

 

I certainly hear the relays clicking for each element when I activate them in diagnostic mode.  Unfortunately everything is out of warranty, so I'll see if I can get a bake element (seems hard to get Wolf parts except through some of the authorized service places) for one oven and test it out.  Might even pick up a broil element.  I'm not really comfortable doing live voltage testing on this oven to check if it has power at the leads.

 

Nothing on the floor of the oven, and in 12 years I probably only used the self-clean a half-dozen times, so not sure why...maybe just a failure prone part.  Unfortunately these come out through the back, lots of parts to move out of the way...



#12 bmh

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 09:26 PM

Update: 

 

I replaced both hidden bake elemets and the broiler elements.  Now almost everything works, just the broiler is still not functioning.  I can hear the relay clicking on the board when i try to activate the broiler, but i really don't know if there is power going to the element.  I guess I need to do a live voltage test, but i'm not 100% sure how to do this.

 

From what I've read, I take one lead off the broil element and connect it to my multimeter (set to 250 ACV) and leave the other broiler lead connected to the broil element.  Make sure leads are not touching chassis. Then i connect the other end of my multimeter to a gound source.  Should the ground source be on the oven (a green wire) or should it be something not on the oven?  Then i would turn on the broiler and check the multimeter.  Repeat for other side.  If there is no voltage, I would assume i have a bad relay board. 

 

Could someone confirm this method?

 

Also, can an individual relay on a board be replaced, or do you just replace the whole board?

 

 

Thanks for all the help!






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