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Fixing a Washing Machine with Slow or No Cold Water Fill

washing machine washer cold water fill slow rinse stall valve sediment

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8 replies to this topic

#1 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 09:09 AM

Slow or no cold water fill is a common problem that can affect any washer, top loader or front loader, for a variety of reasons.  It's especially common for houses on a well or with older plumbing.  On washers with this problem that do the rinse cycle with cold water only, the washer will often stall because it's waiting for the water to fill to a certain level but never does (or takes a really long time to do so).  In this journey into the belly of the beast, Samurai Appliance Repair Man ( http://Appliantology.org ) goes undercover as The Appliance Guru ( http://ApplianceGuru.com ) to find and fix the problem.

 

 

Nylon-braided Washer Fill Hoses:  http://bit.ly/1bGfLjp
Good pliers to use for replacing fill hoses:  http://amzn.to/1iT71uw
Water Fill Valve Kit, original:  http://bit.ly/MGcSJ8
Water Fill Valve Kit, replacement: http://bit.ly/NvB0iE
Whole House Sediment Filter Kit:  http://amzn.to/1bRs67B
 


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#2 BryanS

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 11:06 AM

Nice. You answered the question I had in the video about cleaning the screens. This book I have stated that you could pull the screens, clean, and then reinsert them. Obviously, I see that isn't recommended now. I did remember reading somewhere that plumbers have a habit of pulling those screens for customers, but I heard that was a no non like you stated.

Have you seen those nylon hoses for refrigerator hookups? Any recommendations on where to buy them. I tried llooking for them before, but no one around here carries them that I've found. I know they make them because a lot of new homes I've went out in northern VA had them. I figured the builders bought them with the appliances though. Another good video for a noob like me :)

#3 BryanS

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 11:41 AM

https://www.amazon.c...7VA04C1XAC94C2

Never mind. I found the ice maker nylon hoses on amazon.



#4 BryanS

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 11:56 AM

https://www.amazon.c...1T5BK2FB495TCK

https://www.amazon.c...5HHXB00KMVPA67

I found these by a reviewer on those nylon hoses you mentioned. Have you ever used these or recommended for people with sediment or hard water issues that clog water valves? They appear to be for RV's, but some people said they have been using them on their washer hoses.



#5 BryanS

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 12:12 PM


https://www.amazon.c...VSNEK5MDHHEVY8

Apparently Whirlpool makes the screened o rings as well. They are a little more expensive. I wonder if they would drop the pressure of the water coming in though. I just thought I would share incase you didn't know about them. I may buy a new set of those nylon hoses and some of those screens just to see if I notice a pressure drop myself from the extra screens.



#6 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 12:48 PM

Good question, Bryan!

 

I don't like the add-in hose screens because they are a Band-Aid solution. If sediment really is a problem in the household water supply, then the correct solution is to install a whole house sediment filter like this one:  http://amzn.to/1bRs67B



#7 BryanS

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 12:52 PM

Agreed. I just lectured my uncle about those when I cleaned all gunk out of his water softener. He still hasn't done it :) I just thought it might also be an option for hard water for people like me living in trailers that don't have room for a water softener. It's been hard on the tubs and sinks etc.

#8 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 01:00 PM

Depends on the type of hardness.  If you're talking about true dissolved hardness, the sediment filter or hose screens won't do you any good because the stuff is dissolved in the water.  This contrasted to suspended "hardness," more properly called sediment, which is just particles suspended in the water.  Most sediment filters will take out sediment down to 5 microns in diameter.  Screens are only effective against much larger particles.  

 

Neither filters or screens will take out dissolved hardness because it becomes part of the aqueous solution and you have to use chemical methods to remove it, like ion exchange or brine (salt) tanks.  



#9 BryanS

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 01:08 PM

Gotcha. I figured that. I need a stackable dryer and washer, then I'll have room for a water softener.





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