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DPSQ495GT0WW-- guttering flame, propane dryer


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25 replies to this topic

#1 DanInKansas

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 03:08 PM

Original call was for "no heat." 

 

Went out, put dryer into service.  Noticed that the dryer started as soon as I advanced the timer, so push-to-start switch is stuck in closed position. 

 

Put my mirror at the observation port, saw a nice bright glow, and then heard the flame ignite.  The sound was absolutely wrong -- sounded like wind rattling the windows -- whump whump whump.

 

Took the dryer apart, held the belt switch in place and watched. When the flame ignited, it moved in bursts, like a guttering torch.  After about a minute the flame shut off. This seemed dangerous to me -- bad and incomplete combustion.  Maybe I'm just a pantywaist, but I don't like flame stuff misbehaving. 

 

Quizzed the tenant.  No other propane appliance is acting up.  Tank is at about 25% capacity, give or take, so should be enough to supply steady pressure.  Hot water tank is on the same line as the dryer, and according to tenant it's been fine.

 

Put in a new valve set (WE14X215) and a new propane conversion kit.  Started the dryer up.  EXACT same behavior -- bad quality, inconsistent flame.  When flame ignites a small "POP" happens at the orifice with a yellow flame and then there's a small blue flame right at the orifice along with sputtering blue flame in the burn tube. 

 

Tech sheet says to check venting -- this all happened with the drum off or on, and with the vent hose disconnected from wall.  Additionally, tech sheet says to check safety thermostat and trimmer -- I alternated taking the wires off these and running the dryer with the leads alligator clipped together -- same behavior. 

 

So. New valves, electrical checks out.  Thoughts?  

 

 



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#2 MA tech.

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 09:34 PM

Focus on the gas supply. Tank low, failing regulator, rusting/ corrosion in line.



#3 electro_doc

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 09:45 PM

rust or corrosion in the flu blocking gas or starving for air?  kink in gas line, valve not open all the way?


Edited by electro_doc, 22 February 2014 - 09:45 PM.


#4 DanInKansas

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 10:48 PM

Rust or corrosion is logical given the age and condition of the piping. Valve at the wall was opened all the way before and after valve change out. 

 

Would a manometer pick up the decrease in supply pressure, if there is one? We don't own one at the shop and I've never used one. 



#5 splinterexpert

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 01:00 PM

I saw something similar in a water heater- copper supply line had corroded/deteriorated on the inside. Innner diameter was reduced so much, almost no gas was getting through. The flame floated and guttered- I thought vent and air supply at first.

#6 electro_doc

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 01:16 PM

I don't think a manometer would work for that.  It's for checking pressure but not while you're using it.  It might work to check the pressure of the gas leaving the regulator.  I was going to say you could have a regulator problem, not letting enough gas trough.



#7 DanInKansas

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 03:16 PM

I saw something similar in a water heater- copper supply line had corroded/deteriorated on the inside. Innner diameter was reduced so much, almost no gas was getting through. The flame floated and guttered- I thought vent and air supply at first.

 

That very well could be it.  The supply line runs in an iron pipe across the ceiling of the basement. One iron pipe comes straight down from there to the valve.  The valve has a copper pipe that comes out and around in an sort of a half-loop.  

 

Sounds like a way to test/verify this would be to shut the gas off at the valve and then disconnect the copper and inspect visually? 



#8 electro_doc

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 03:40 PM

Yeah and check the iron pipe too.  I'd bet more on the pipe than the copper.  It has a tendency to corrode around turns or valves.  It"s because the friction causes electrical activity attracting the corrosion.  Let us know what you find.  I think you are on the right track.

 

Doc



#9 MA tech.

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 04:21 PM

If tanks haven't been replaced in many years you may need to contact supplier. LP tanks will develop moisture inside tank and cause rusting/corrosion. Also the supply line coming from into house can corrode from the inside because of moisture. It doesn't sound like an exhaust problem. It really sound like poor gas supply to the dryer.



#10 DanInKansas

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 04:35 PM

If tanks haven't been replaced in many years you may need to contact supplier. LP tanks will develop moisture inside tank and cause rusting/corrosion. Also the supply line coming from into house can corrode from the inside because of moisture. It doesn't sound like an exhaust problem. It really sound like poor gas supply to the dryer.

 

Customer reaction is going to be: "Oh horse apples.  All the other propane stuff is working fine, fix my dryer."  Any ideas on how to explain why one part of the system would corrode or give bad pressure before another one?  (Honest question: I haven't run across this particular problem before.)



#11 MA tech.

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 05:00 PM

Sorry Dan I didn't catch that part, other LP appliances are fine. However, do we really know for sure the other appliances are fine? If yes than we can focus only on the dryer line or shut off. Tough question for ya, are you absolutely certain you installed the correct orifice? I had a similar problem years ago for a customer. THey had only bought the house recently and said dryer was never really right. Poorly drying etc. So of course I'm thinking bad coils, intermittent, failing after on for a bit no problem. Put the new coils on, reassembled dryer and ran to test. This is when I noticed the flame was weak and not right. I'll fix it, I have a valve on my truck. Replaced valve, of course using the orifice from the other, and same frigging thing. Long story short....  the Nat. orifice was never replaced with the LP orifice. By the way this was like a 12-15 year old KA dryer. Strange part was the regulator had been converted. Anyway, installed correct orifice and all was good. Just a thought.



#12 DanInKansas

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 05:15 PM

Definitely sure about the other appliances and the orifice.  We've sold these folks a stove -- gas valve on their old one would stick open after thermostat cut power to igniter.  New stove is working fine.  

 

Orifice is from the LP conversion kit to that valve set, so I'm sure as I can be on that front. 

 

Also behavior is the same from both old and new valve/LP conversion kits, so seems like behavior source would be up the line from the dryer's inlet valve/coil set. 



#13 MA tech.

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 05:21 PM

This goes back to my original thought, focus on supply of gas then. With other appliances ok it would indeed, seem to not make sense that tank and regulator parts of tank are faulty. The supply line just for dryer only is all I can guess.



#14 electro_doc

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 06:02 PM

Did the regulator on the dryer get changed to LP as well?

 

Doc



#15 MA tech.

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 06:19 PM

Did the regulator on the dryer get changed to LP as well?

 

Doc

Good thought. Did you convert regulator of new valve?



#16 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 06:54 PM

Yes.  You need to make sure the blocking pin is installed in the regulator.  See more on this page:  http://fixitnow.com/...gas-to-propane/



#17 DanInKansas

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 09:35 AM

Yes.  You need to make sure the blocking pin is installed in the regulator.  See more on this page:  http://fixitnow.com/...gas-to-propane/

Yes, blocking pin is part of the conversion kit. 



#18 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 10:10 AM

But is it actually installed in this dryer? I've seen numerous botched conversions on both gas dryers and ranges where the PCM replaced the metering spuds but didn't touch the regulator.

#19 DanInKansas

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 01:23 PM

Aw hell boss, you know by now I ain't no PCM.  I put a new propane conversion kit with the new valve to make sure I had clean undamaged parts in the dryer, and so I used the new blocking pin in the kit.  My usual thinking is "if it's included, it's there for a reason."


Edited by DanInKansas, 24 February 2014 - 01:27 PM.


#20 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 01:34 PM

I put a new propane conversion kit with the new valve to make sure I had clean undamaged parts in the dryer, and so I used the new blocking pin in the kit.

None of this was clearly or explicitly stated in your posts, hence my clarifying question.

It wasn't even clear that you did the original conversion.

As far as I knew from what you said, you were batting cleanup behind a PCM.




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