Jump to content



Learn appliance repair at the Samurai Tech Academy.  Learn more.  Earn more.


Parts Search
Site Search

FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Welcome to Appliantology.org, the Web's Premiere Appliance Repair Resource!

The world-famous Samurai Appliance Repair Forums


To get started, click here.


Already a member of the Appliantology Academy? Just sign in with your username and password in the upper right-hand corner of the screen.

 


Photo

How to disassemble a dishwasher?


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Decarolis214

Decarolis214

    Unsui

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:27 AM

The dishwasher in my home was installed before the owners had new tile put in.  Now, the legs on the dishwasher (which is ancient and doesn't work) do not clear the tile (by about 2-3") for me to remove the dishwasher.  I don't want to have to lift the counter or damage the tile so my only alternative seems to be to take apart the dishwasher in the existing space.  Any suggestions?

 

Thanks,

 

Crystal



Use the Appliantology Parts Search Box to Find What You Need!
Enter your model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

#2 john63

john63

    Dean of LG Appliantology

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,211 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:31 AM

If the dishwasher is *not* a "tall tub" model---use a reciprocating saw (sawzall) to cut the lower frame.

 

The replacement dishwasher should be a design made for "built-up" floors (GE has one).


To eliminate:

Musty odor

L-O-N-G cycle times

Dingy/yellowing whites

Suds error message

Slow spin speeds

Intermittent water leaks (from rear of washer)

And other annoying symptoms which vary brand-to brand.

Read below:

The *correct* amount of HE (High Efficiency) detergent that should be used in any front load or agitatorless top load washer with tub sizes 3.0 cu ft and larger is as follows:

HE: (2) Tablespoons Per Wash Load

HE 2X: (1) Tablespoon

HE 3X: (1) Teaspoon

Perform a TUB CLEAN CYCLE every (4) months.

Use: "Tide Washing Machine Cleaner"

#3 BryanS

BryanS

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:I don't drink

Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:33 AM

Are the front legs screwed up all the way? If not you may be able to get pliers around the foot to screw them up. I'm not sure if they would go up enough. You would need to remove the toekick first. Maybe the feet can be cut off to provide more clearance. I've never had to remove one like that but just a thought.

#4 Decarolis214

Decarolis214

    Unsui

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:38 AM

Are the front legs screwed up all the way? If not you may be able to get pliers around the foot to screw them up. I'm not sure if they would go up enough. You would need to remove the toekick first. Maybe the feet can be cut off to provide more clearance. I've never had to remove one like that but just a thought.

Yes, I tried to screw them up but still have a clearance issue.  I think sawing off the legs may be my only option...


If the dishwasher is *not* a "tall tub" model---use a reciprocating saw (sawzall) to cut the lower frame.

 

The replacement dishwasher should be a design made for "built-up" floors (GE has one).

Thanks!  I was looking for an alternative to the sawzall but that may be my only option...  Thank you for the info about the new dishwasher, I wasn't aware that they made those. 



#5 BryanS

BryanS

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:I don't drink

Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:54 AM

I don't know if you could get that dremel tool with the flat blade that saws left to right to cut if you don't want to use a sawzall.

#6 BryanS

BryanS

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:I don't drink

Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:58 AM

https://www.dremel.c...40#.Uxn6MNNOnFo

I don't know if they cut metal though.

#7 Decarolis214

Decarolis214

    Unsui

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:58 AM

I don't know if you could get that dremel tool with the flat blade that saws left to right to cut if you don't want to use a sawzall.

Good point, didn't think of that.



#8 Chat_in_FL

Chat_in_FL

    Havoc

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,401 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:What's on tap?

Posted 07 March 2014 - 05:37 PM

I've also heard of techs folding the tub in on itself (compressing/compacting it in place). Another option, what-ever seems the easiest for you...


We, the unwilling, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much, for so long, with so little, we are now qualified to do anything with nothing.

Mother Teresa

 

The views and opinions expressed in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by my employer. All data and information provided is for informational purposes only.

 

Big Brother

 


#9 -Mike-

-Mike-

    Kohai

  • Sublime Master of Appliantology
  • PipPipPip
  • 338 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:diet Pepsi

Posted 07 March 2014 - 09:52 PM

I've ran in to only one that I couldn't get out and I was going to grab the Sawzall but then I saw a ratchet strap in the back of my truck and it gave me an idea. I put each hook on the front feet and cranked them in together. Doing that bent the frame in enough to get the extra 1 inch I needed to pull it out. Once the front is out the back is easier since the dishwasher is not as tall on the back.

That was on a 2000 era GE and they have a pretty flimsy frame so it worked well.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Use the Appliantology Parts Finder to Get What You Need!
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

Your Sometimes-Lucid Host:
Samurai Appliance Repair Man
"If I can't help you fix your appliance and make you 100% satisfied, I will come to your home and slice open my belly,
spilling my steaming entrails onto your floor."


The Appliance Guru | Master Samurai Tech

Real Time Analytics