Jump to content


Use this Search Box to Find Appliance Repair Help Now
Need help finding your model number?
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!


FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Welcome to Appliantology.org, the Web's Premiere Appliance Repair Resource for DIYers!

The world-famous Samurai Appliance Repair Forums


You can post a question and get repair help for FREE! Click here to get started.


Already a member of the Appliantology Academy? Just sign in with your username and password in the upper right-hand corner of the screen.

 


Photo

Whirlpool dishwasher DU1300XTVS1 shuts itself off

whirlpool dishwasher

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 frunch

frunch

    Sōhei

  • Professional Appliantologist
  • PipPipPip
  • 221 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:River Horse Hipp-O-Lantern Pumpkin Ale

Posted 25 March 2014 - 11:34 AM

I just checked out a Whirlpool dishwasher where it will start a cycle, it fills with water, but as soon as it starts the main wash motor it shuts itself off. It does it consistently, tried it 3 times and it did it every time. When it shuts itself off, it shuts off the lights on the control panel. It can be started right back up, the buttons on the control panel respond properly. I'm thinking the computer is bad, but was hoping someone here can chime in with any suggestions to troubleshoot this further. I would just swap out the computer, but I don't have one in stock. Any ideas?

Thanks!

Trevor



Use the Appliantology Parts Search Box to Find What You Need!
Enter your model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

#2 micabay

micabay

    Senpai

  • Sublime Master of Appliantology
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 710 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Drifter Pale Ale

Posted 25 March 2014 - 08:23 PM

Is it failing under load or does it go into drain right away?     Does the motor loose voltage when it stops?  How are the wire connections in the junction box? (Usually romex, but sometimes it is corded) 


Edited by micabay, 25 March 2014 - 08:24 PM.


#3 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Shōgun

  • Master Samurai Tech
  • 29,046 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Sapporo Original Draft Rice Lager

Posted 25 March 2014 - 09:20 PM

Open up the control panel and have a good look at the triacs on the control board-- you may see the one for the wash motor smoked.  But keep in mind that the absence of burned components does not mean the board is good.   It's just a obvious indication that it's bad.  Part number: AP4303742

Part number: AP4303742



#4 Scottthewolf

Scottthewolf

    Senpai

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,810 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Dunkin Donuts Coffee

Posted 25 March 2014 - 09:37 PM

I've had a few thermal fuses that open and reset even though it's supposed to be non resettable.


Scott Wolf

#5 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Shōgun

  • Master Samurai Tech
  • 29,046 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Sapporo Original Draft Rice Lager

Posted 26 March 2014 - 07:44 AM

I've had a few thermal fuses that open and reset even though it's supposed to be non resettable.

 

Interesting, Scott!  I've not seen that yet but will keep that in mind.  

 

TCO Part number: AP4423189

Part number: AP4423189



#6 micabay

micabay

    Senpai

  • Sublime Master of Appliantology
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 710 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Drifter Pale Ale

Posted 26 March 2014 - 09:22 AM

I've had a few thermal fuses that open and reset even though it's supposed to be non resettable.

I've seen similar but when they "reset" they usually measure at or above a couple hundred ohms.  Should be around 0 ohms if in good working order, Yes?


Interesting, Scott!  I've not seen that yet but will keep that in mind.  

 

TCO Part number: AP4423189

Part number: AP4423189

Also, a good idea to follow the instructions when installing this part.  New wires must be spliced in.  Can't just replace the fuse, for good reason.  The terminals may have a loose connection, causing it to heat up, opening the circuit.  Ask me how I know!   :rolleyes:


Edited by micabay, 26 March 2014 - 09:23 AM.


#7 Scottthewolf

Scottthewolf

    Senpai

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,810 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Dunkin Donuts Coffee

Posted 26 March 2014 - 10:23 PM

A thermal fuse is nothing more than a switch, you are looking for continuity, not ohms.   Ohms is a resistance value only used for loads, such as a motor, a solenoid, a wax motor or a thermistor.


Scott Wolf

#8 micabay

micabay

    Senpai

  • Sublime Master of Appliantology
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 710 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Drifter Pale Ale

Posted 27 March 2014 - 06:38 PM

A thermal fuse is nothing more than a switch, you are looking for continuity, not ohms.   Ohms is a resistance value only used for loads, such as a motor, a solenoid, a wax motor or a thermistor.

If it's not load bearing, why does Whirlpool use such large gauge wire to that circuit?



#9 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Shōgun

  • Master Samurai Tech
  • 29,046 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Sapporo Original Draft Rice Lager

Posted 27 March 2014 - 07:15 PM

If it's not load bearing, why does Whirlpool use such large gauge wire to that circuit?

 

Wire gauge is based on the current it has to handle-- large gauge wire is needed for larger currents.  In this case, current for the entire unit is passing through the TCO, including heater current when it comes on.  The wire has to sized to handle the highest current scenario. 



#10 micabay

micabay

    Senpai

  • Sublime Master of Appliantology
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 710 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Drifter Pale Ale

Posted 27 March 2014 - 08:23 PM

Wire gauge is based on the current it has to handle-- large gauge wire is needed for larger currents.  In this case, current for the entire unit is passing through the TCO, including heater current when it comes on.  The wire has to sized to handle the highest current scenario. 

That was my thought exactly!  Yet: 

 

A thermal fuse is nothing more than a switch, you are looking for continuity, not ohms.   Ohms is a resistance value only used for loads, such as a motor, a solenoid, a wax motor or a thermistor.

continuity test reveals if the wire is at least forming a complete circuit, yes?   If that circuit has 1, 10, 100, or 1000 ohms it would test good when testing for continuity.  This is why we check our readings, rather than just continuity.   If the TCO is partially tripped, it can test good for continuity yet not able to carry the current of the machine.



#11 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Shōgun

  • Master Samurai Tech
  • 29,046 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Sapporo Original Draft Rice Lager

Posted 27 March 2014 - 09:59 PM

Most meters top out at about 50 to 100 ohms for continuity measurement.  It's rare for a TCO to partially trip-- more common for them to fail under load.  But if they partially trip, you'll typical see a resistance reading in the kilo-ohms range, far above the limit for the continuity setting on most meters.  

 

I'll typically use the continuity setting on my meter when I'm chasing wires through an appliance or checking a cable harness for suspected breaks.  it's not unreasonable to use it for checking switches-- just unreliable.  Ohms testing can lie, regardless of meter setting, because something can check good on ohms and still be bad-- failing under load.  That's why I always prefer live testing.  



#12 frunch

frunch

    Sōhei

  • Professional Appliantologist
  • PipPipPip
  • 221 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:River Horse Hipp-O-Lantern Pumpkin Ale

Posted 01 April 2014 - 07:16 PM

Wow, glad this post sparked an insightful discussion! I learned a lot reading through the responses here, thank you all! Of course, since I left the dishwasher has been working fine! :woot:

I realize now that I forgot to add one important detail: I re-seated all of the connectors on the CPU, including the touch pad ribbon connector.  As a matter of fact, I just fixed a Kitchen Aid dishwasher that was dead (no lights coming on, won't run at all) a couple days ago by re-seating the connectors to the CPU. (Of course, I told the customer that the CPU and possibly touchpad would need to be replaced if the problem returns)

 

Either way, I'm sure they'll be calling back sooner or later. When they do, I'll follow up here!

Thanks again, everyone!







0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Use the Appliantology Parts Finder to Get What You Need!
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

Your Sometimes-Lucid Host:
Samurai Appliance Repair Man
"If I can't help you fix your appliance and make you 100% satisfied, I will come to your home and slice open my belly,
spilling my steaming entrails onto your floor."

The Appliance Guru | AppliancePartsResource.com | Samurai's Blog

Real Time Analytics