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jhausch

GE Fridge model PFS22SISBSS Cooling Issues. Searched here, but would like to recap...

6 posts in this topic

GE

PN PFS22SISBSS

SN VL051643

I have a GE fridge that is not cooling as it should. I did some searching here and thought I had it figured out, but I'd like to recap to make sure.

For a while now, I'd been hearing that "click-pause-click" described by others. I actually thought it was my HVAC ductwork going through thermal expansion/contraction, but now I realize it was the fridge (first "DOH!")

The other day, I thought I'd left the freezer cracked open because the temp was up a bit and things were "frosty".

This morning I noticed the freezer temp up to 16 so I wheeled it out to vac the coils. We have two dogs, so dirty coils where what I suspected.

I removed the back cover and noticed the fan spinning very slowly...There was some dog hair, but less than expected. The coils and compressor were very warm. This is where I then realized the clicking was coming from the relay/starter pack attached to the compressor. (there's that "DOH!", I mentioned)

I put a volt meter on the pink and white wires on J2 (from reading here those were for the fan and should read 11 volts. I read less than 4volts.

I work in industrial automation, so I had a spare muffin fan from a project and a 24Vdc power supply to run it. I set that up to cool the condensor. I hung this little fan on the condensor coil blowing from back to front. Since the airflow can't really go out the "front", it comes out the sides of the coils. This airflow out the sides was enough to stop the regular fan. The airflow out the other side seemed to be doing a nice job of cooling the compressor back down....

However, things never seemed to start back up. I left it be for a while and temps did not come down. The click-pause-click continued.

I also noticed one of the surface mount capacitors on the motherboard seems to have let out its magic smoke. This cap (U14, I think) is located under the connection header just to the right of J2 (J5, maybe?). The connection header this capacitor is below has nothing connected to it. There is even a little brown tell-tale of the overheat shown on the bottom of that unused connection header....

I watched that cap through a "click-pause-click" thinking I might see an arc or something...but that's an awfully small cap to be in a motor circuit. Maybe it is for the fan?

So, anyhow, I read the threads on the board and thought I might have the motherboard issue. I called GE (and confirmed elsewhere on the interwebs) and I am not in the eligible SN group. I was prepared to buy the motherboard and fan, but then I read some more on here and am wondering if I should buy a new run cap, too.

Based on these drawings...http://www.appliancepartspros.com/parts-for-ge-pfs22sisbss.html

Do I need

801 - Main Control Board

812 - Condensor Fan Motor

811 - Overload Relay

821 - Run Cap

Some, All, None....?

What do you folks think? Thanks in advance for the help.

Jim

Edited by DurhamAppliance
ADDED MODEL NUMBER TO TITLE

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If your start relay is getting propet voltage, and not starting compressor, replace start relay first.

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Concur.  Those GE made start devices, which are also found on many Frigidaire products, are flaky at best.  May even test good with an ohm meter, but still not perform under a load.

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Interesting.... So no worries on the slow turning fan and the tiny blown cap (U14) on the motherboard?

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Why would you want to repair all the issues at once if addressing one of those issues may either solve many of the other issues or make all the other issues irrelevant?

if you are getting power to the relay

replacing the relay first will:

1) Help determine if the compressor is good... if a new relay doesn't start the compressor and that relay is getting power (it is clicking right??) then you may have a compressor failure . If that is the case, it may be deemed a terminal event. Logic 101

2)Condenser fan... the fan may or may not be bad. If bad, if may have caused the compressor to burn out... replacing the fan first would be as logical as buying new tires on a car that has a catastrophic engine failue.

Furthermore some GE condenser fans on similar models are dc pwm fans whose speed corresponds to the compressor speed... low speed can look like 5 volts. This may not be the case here as we are dealing with a single speed compressor.. but why go through this excersize if it may wind up being moot regardless of whether the compressor is good or bad?

3) the perceived smoking on the board could be the result of electrical feedback from a bad relay. Although not all the time, fixing one problem may solve another.

A fridge is a system and based upon experience we learn to block out much of the chatter, to ignore the syrens, if you will, that may lead us perilously off course but instead proceed in a systematic manner. The possibility that your fan took out both the board and compressor is real but once we know the compressor is good, we will move to the next problematic symptom.

Edited by DurhamAppliance

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Why would you want to repair all the issues at once if addressing one of those issues may either solve many of the other issues or make all the other issues irrelevant?

 

If    A + B = C  

&    C - A = B

.'.    C - B = A

 

 

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