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What the hell is wrong with the dishwasher engineers these days?


22 replies to this topic

#1 Scottthewolf

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 12:04 AM

My latest gripe is the new style GE dishwashers. Seriously, why must the main control board be at the bottom of the tub and why the hell must the door be removed off the hinges to access it?  Even to gain access to the control panel at the top of the door, the door has to be removed off the hinges to gain access to it. STUPID, and all to save money on screws.

 

Also, On Bosch's newest line of dishwashers,the main control board is in the base of the unit. To access it, the dishwasher has to be pulled out from under the counter. Again, Total stupidity. Better hope that there's never a leak down there, it will totally ruin these boards.


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#2 Chat_in_FL

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 05:31 AM

Like Bosch is known for the quality of their dishwasher boards to begin with...


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#3 PDuff

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 08:51 AM

I think I'm starting to take it personal.  I liked Maytag's belt driven pump d/w; it was discontinued.  I liked Whirlpool's vertical motor; discontinued.  I liked GE's exposed fan-style impeller on the motor; revised, but still free-able.  Mastered Bosch's pan-base style; Acsenta introduced with the sole purpose to aggravate me.  WPL's GWS;  Yup.



#4 Scottthewolf

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 02:50 PM

Too bad we can't switch jobs with the engineers, marketing and sales dept for a month and see if those people last as appliance technicians. I bet some of them don't last a week doing our jobs.


Oh, I forgot LG, Samsdung and Electrosux.  Let's make nothing accessible from the front underneath except the water valve.


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#5 john63

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 10:01 PM

When the original KitchenAid dishwasher (Hobart) was discontinued---everything else was just a dishwasher.

 

All Tall Tub designs (which maximize vertical space)---require removal-from-counter for service.

 

A great revenue/profit maker---and for that reason---I thoroughly enjoy servicing those (especially the LG dishwasher).

 

Incidentally---the latest LG dishwasher design---is new and does allow for repair/replacement of components without the need to pull out the entire unit.

 

1) Drain Motor

 

2) Pump Housing

 

3) Water Valve

 

4) Heating Element & Thermistor Assy

 

5) Diverter Valve Motor and Micro-switch (re-directs water pressure from lower wash arm----to the middle and upper wash arms every 90 seconds)

 

6) Noise Filter

 

7) Water Level Frequency Sensor


To eliminate:

Musty odor

L-O-N-G cycle times

Dingy/yellowing whites

Suds error message

Slow spin speeds

Intermittent water leaks (from rear of washer)

And other annoying symptoms which vary brand-to brand.

Read below:

The *correct* amount of HE (High Efficiency) detergent that should be used in any front load or agitatorless top load washer with tub sizes 3.0 cu ft and larger is as follows:

HE: (2) Tablespoons Per Wash Load

HE 2X: (1) Tablespoon

HE 3X: (1) Teaspoon

Perform a TUB CLEAN CYCLE every (4) months.

Use: "Tide Washing Machine Cleaner"

#6 Scottthewolf

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 12:48 AM

That's fine, but sometimes I run into the worst install jobs,  like a floor built up around the dishwasher, glued to a granite countertop, etc.


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#7 MicaBay

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 08:24 AM

That's fine, but sometimes I run into the worst install jobs,  like a floor built up around the dishwasher, glued to a granite countertop, etc.

Someitmes? I'd be willing to say over 50% of the time the install isn't done properly....  In our area, I think the person that installs for Lowes doesn't know his stuff..... 



#8 Applianceman97

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 09:03 AM

Someitmes? I'd be willing to say over 50% of the time the install isn't done properly.... In our area, I think the person that installs for Lowes doesn't know his stuff.....


Had one yesterday where the homeowner laid the floor towards the dishwasher and actually wedged the foot of it between two planks. Only way to level it was for the homeowner to cut the foot off and shim it with wood.

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#9 PDuff

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 02:11 PM

I intentionally left LG and Samsung out of my complaining because their design hasn't really changed.  Revised beyond belief, but not changed.  I'll look forward (I hope) to the new accessible LG.  Electrolux (Don't call me Frigidaire!), I'm still on the fence.  Just glad I don't do their warranty work anymore.

 

I liked the original Fisher Paykel dishdrawers.  Easy to diagnose and repair, and generated LOT$ of COD service calls.  The later "enhancements"......Feh.  I'm still having nightmares about the F9.

 

Now, the Hobart made Kitchenaid.  I got a soft spot for this one.  I sold and installed probably the last one of these units in my area back in the mid '90's.  Servicing the older ones was cake.  Usual problems were dispenser bi-metals, triple t-stats, inlet valves and drain solenoids, or selector switches.  Wonder how they're doing with that lifetime tub warranty.



#10 Applianceman97

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 03:17 PM

Ugh. Frigidaire... who the hell puts the pump in the back of the sump assy. IDIOTS. I did change a circulation motor in one the other day without pulling the unit. DId it in 15 minutes.


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#11 Spannerwrench

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 03:42 PM

I liked the original Fisher Paykel dishdrawers. Easy to diagnose and repair, and generated LOT$ of COD service calls. The later "enhancements"......Feh. I'm still having nightmares about the F9.

Ya, that F9 is a pain, it can be pretty much anything. I've had a few of them and each time it's a different component and the only way to find it, at least the easiest is to pull out the full service manual and ohm out every single component from the board.

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#12 Scottthewolf

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 09:26 PM

Oh, I forgot the Pain in the Asko and Viking.   


Scott Wolf

#13 PDuff

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 09:09 AM

"Vaskos", and their pioneer use of those crappy hose clamps.  Fix one leak only to find another.  Beware the diverter.

 

And Miele.  Perfect for the customer who enjoys expensive and time consuming repairs.  Very easy to price yourself out of the job.



#14 B4UTRUST

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 05:41 PM

Actually the new LG dishwashers(last year or so) you can do an entire sump swap without pulling the unit out. Pretty much not a lot you have to pull it for, which I was thankful for. And to be fair, you could do an entire sump swap on the older LGs too without pulling it. I've done it a few times because of bad installs. It is a pain in the ass, it takes awhile, it's difficult, and not a fun experience, but it can be done. And when it comes down to a situation of having to dismantle part of the flooring and cabinetry to get the unit out to work on it, or working on it installed as is, you did what you had to. That was when I was working for LG and didn't have an option to say no. 


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#15 Scottthewolf

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 10:56 PM

"Vaskos", and their pioneer use of those crappy hose clamps.  Fix one leak only to find another.  Beware the diverter.

 

And Miele.  Perfect for the customer who enjoys expensive and time consuming repairs.  Very easy to price yourself out of the job.

Funny how Whirlpool started using those hose clamps on the GWS models, only for it to bite them in the ass with these huge water leaks that cost them a recall.


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#16 PDuff

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 09:17 AM

I have a feeling that there's still one Modern Maid combo d/w cooktop oven out there somewhere, lying in wait for me, ready to pounce.   :peepwallA:  



#17 sh2sh2

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 03:34 PM

Actually the new LG dishwashers(last year or so) you can do an entire sump swap without pulling the unit out. Pretty much not a lot you have to pull it for, which I was thankful for. And to be fair, you could do an entire sump swap on the older LGs too without pulling it. I've done it a few times because of bad installs. It is a pain in the ass, it takes awhile, it's difficult, and not a fun experience, but it can be done. And when it comes down to a situation of having to dismantle part of the flooring and cabinetry to get the unit out to work on it, or working on it installed as is, you did what you had to. That was when I was working for LG and didn't have an option to say no. 

How could LG force you to repair units that were improperly installed, when we run into somthing like that we leave and say call us back when the unit is accessible



#18 Scottthewolf

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 10:37 PM

I have a feeling that there's still one Modern Maid combo d/w cooktop oven out there somewhere, lying in wait for me, ready to pounce.   :peepwallA:  

Yeah, but most parts for it are NLA. Especially the dishwasher part built by D&M.


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#19 B4UTRUST

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 10:54 PM

sh2sh2, because I was an LG employee and the call centers and executive services were staffed by people who just wanted people off the phone so even though we clearly notated that the installation was improper, that we couldn't actually work on the unit to repair it the way it needed to be done, we were told tough shit go back out and do it anyway. 

 

It came down to a situation of a pissed off, irate customer calling up, screaming, yelling and throwing a hissy and someone on the other end of the line who didn't give a fuck because they, in the end, didn't have to deal with the fallout if they just passed the buck to a tech. So they would just reschedule the job and drop it back on us and leave it for us to deal with. We could refuse all we liked, but the customer moaned and bitched and we got stuck with the job again and again until it got done. 

 

Hell, we would have notes put on certain customer files not to ever dispatch them back out to certain techs due to problems. These notes weren't subtle. It was a giant popup on the customer's file that appeared as soon as you opened the file to schedule a new call, review an old call or even looked at it cross-eyed. And immediately it was clicked as 'ok', dismissed and promptly ignored and the call dispatched out anyway. Because the people scheduling the calls didn't give a fuck because they weren't the ones having to deal with it. 


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#20 john63

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 12:41 AM

Pitiful.

 

Not much different than Hitler ordering his phantom army (geriatrics and children) to launch a counter-attack against the Russian army during the Battle for Berlin.

 

It ain't gonna happen :)

 

Which brings me to another thought...

 

LG has an ongoing on-site Training Program in Huntsville,Alabama. A kind of boot camp for LG techs---to be certified in all aspects of service.

 

Training/familiarization of LG products

 

Trial runs (at volunteer homes) in which an instructor accompanies the student-tech into a home to perform repairs (evaluated on the diagnosis & repair as well as the servicer/customer interaction and appearance)

 

This is all good and well but----why not have the Regional Service Managers ride shotgun too.

 

Many of the RSMs these days---clearly have no experience in the service field. Most of the original Service Managers are gone. These were the guys that---in some cases---had decades of experience in the field.

 

The "replacement" RSMs would likely be shocked at the many and varied circumstances encountered during a day or week of service work.

 

I'd wholeheartedly volunteer to do *their* job for a week in exchange. It would be very interesting to observe how the RSMs would handle those "Mission Impossibles" that B4UTRUST mentioned:)

 

But like the Battle for Berlin---that ain't gonna happen either:)


To eliminate:

Musty odor

L-O-N-G cycle times

Dingy/yellowing whites

Suds error message

Slow spin speeds

Intermittent water leaks (from rear of washer)

And other annoying symptoms which vary brand-to brand.

Read below:

The *correct* amount of HE (High Efficiency) detergent that should be used in any front load or agitatorless top load washer with tub sizes 3.0 cu ft and larger is as follows:

HE: (2) Tablespoons Per Wash Load

HE 2X: (1) Tablespoon

HE 3X: (1) Teaspoon

Perform a TUB CLEAN CYCLE every (4) months.

Use: "Tide Washing Machine Cleaner"




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