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Fftr1814lw - freon level


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4 replies to this topic

#1 ekimura

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 01:10 PM

Just charged a fftr1814lw that was low on freon.

It's cooling just fine now, but I feel like I might have overcharged it by some because the suction line is freezing up.

I'm pretty sure this isn't normal.

Anyways, when the unit is off the pressure is at 50 psi, while running it sits anywhere from 8-15 psi.

The model tag says that the low side should be at 140 psi but also says it holds 4.25 ounces. .....I emptied about 3/4 of a 8.25 ounce can...

Thanks

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#2 BryanS

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 03:09 PM

Psi should be around 3-5 psi. Ignore the pressure on the tag. That is not operating preasure. That is test pressure as in the max psi you can pump a system with nitrogen for leak testing purposes. Most accurate way is to weigh in with a scale but low side around 3-5 psi should be close on most applications.

Edited by BryanS, 08 July 2014 - 03:09 PM.


#3 ekimura

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 03:20 PM

Thanks.

Is that the normal psi for most residential units? Is it normal for suction lines to accumulate ice with too much freon in the system? It's outside, so that might be part of the reason why ice is forming.

#4 vee8power

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 07:42 AM

There must be a leak if it's low on "freon"



#5 Stevenr4522

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Posted Today, 09:26 PM

Freon doesn't dissipate in a system so if it's getting low you may have a leak. You can obtain freon with dye. After putting it in the system you can find the leak using an black light and filter glasses. In some some situations I have found the leak in the internal coil in the cabinet. If this is the case then you have a boat anchor, unrepairable. In any case if it is repairable you'll need to recover and replace the filter dryer when repairing the leak and recharging. You need a scale to recharge the system. If the tag says 5.64 oz of gas then that is what it is. There is no guess in this situation.




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