Jump to content



Learn appliance repair at the Samurai Tech Academy.  Learn more.  Earn more.


Parts Search
Site Search

FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Welcome to Appliantology.org, the Web's Premiere Appliance Repair Resource!

The world-famous Samurai Appliance Repair Forums


To get started, click here.


Already a member of the Appliantology Academy? Just sign in with your username and password in the upper right-hand corner of the screen.

 


Photo
- - - - -

Bypassing the Factory-Default Rinse Water Level Setting in a Washer

washer water level pressure switch rinse

  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Shōgun

  • Master Samurai Tech
  • 29,617 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Sapporo Original Draft Rice Lager

Posted 17 August 2014 - 11:16 PM

In some of the older (non-HE) top-loading washers, the manufacturers preset the rinse water level to an absurdly low level in order to comply with the Energy Star requirements.   The result is that clothes don't get rinsed properly and so are left with detergent residue in them.   In this adventure in appliance repair, Samurai Appliance Repair Man empowers you with the technical know-how  to bypass this Nanny State setting and increase the water fill level in your washer so it will actually rinse the detergent from your clothes.  Fight the power!  
 
 


Use the Appliantology Parts Search Box to Find What You Need!
Enter your model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

#2 Radio Loco

Radio Loco

    Sōhei

  • Chief Appliantologist
  • PipPipPip
  • 234 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Ginger Ale. On the rocks.

Posted 17 August 2014 - 11:56 PM

Again, excellent video. Did not know this. Thanks.

BTW, those government standards make me want to torch a humongous pile of black tires every April 22nd.
I think this will work. I once saw it on a cartoon.

Or, on the other hand.....

Troubleshooting the appliance's complex electro-mechanical systems is the methodology in which one must, by using analyitical techniques and the process of elimination, determine the cause or causes of a specific failure. Rarely does this cause of a failure directly present itself for you to see.

So.....

To be better equipped to troubleshoot, you will need:

1.) To follow this: Safety first and foremost. Trust your instincts.
2.) Basic hand tools.
3.) A decent DVOM meter. Buy one. Borrow one. You need one.
4.) Last, but certainty not least, common sense. Most of us have it. Slow down and use it.

Now, let's have some fun!

ZIG:
Hope is the power that gives a person the confidence to step out and try.
Success is the maximum utilization of the ability you have.

N.M.:
It always seems impossible until it's done.

#3 john63

john63

    Dean of LG Appliantology

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,211 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 18 August 2014 - 12:28 AM

I recall during Frigidaire Training---I believe in 2004---that the top load washers had different/less water levels to comply with the then-new EPA regulations.

 

And that it was a FEDERAL CRIME for servicers to modify the water level adjustment for the customer.

 

Almost along the lines of modifying a semi-automatic rifle---to full auto mode <laugh>.


To eliminate:

Musty odor

L-O-N-G cycle times

Dingy/yellowing whites

Suds error message

Slow spin speeds

Intermittent water leaks (from rear of washer)

And other annoying symptoms which vary brand-to brand.

Read below:

The *correct* amount of HE (High Efficiency) detergent that should be used in any front load or agitatorless top load washer with tub sizes 3.0 cu ft and larger is as follows:

HE: (2) Tablespoons Per Wash Load

HE 2X: (1) Tablespoon

HE 3X: (1) Teaspoon

Perform a TUB CLEAN CYCLE every (4) months.

Use: "Tide Washing Machine Cleaner"

#4 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Shōgun

  • Master Samurai Tech
  • 29,617 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Sapporo Original Draft Rice Lager

Posted 18 August 2014 - 12:51 AM

And that it was a FEDERAL CRIME for servicers to modify the water level adjustment for the customer.


Seriously?? You'd think there'd be a warning or something posted on the pressure switch if that were the case.

If wonder if the reality is that modifying it simply removes the Energy Star certification but it's not actually a crime. I could see how the two could be confused.

#5 john63

john63

    Dean of LG Appliantology

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,211 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 18 August 2014 - 01:04 AM

Seriously.

 

We were instructed to carry a copy of the new federal requirement---which explained the reduction of water use.

 

This was done---to prove that the servicer was "not making this up"---and that there was no defect with the "new" Frigidaire top load washer.

 

The language in the bulletin specifically stated that it was a "federal offense" for a servicer to modify/adjust the water level switch (to increase the amount of fill water).

 

I'm not surprised---that you're surprised:)

 

There's lots of things that are "Federal Offenses"---that are not known to the average American.


Edited by john63, 18 August 2014 - 01:12 AM.

To eliminate:

Musty odor

L-O-N-G cycle times

Dingy/yellowing whites

Suds error message

Slow spin speeds

Intermittent water leaks (from rear of washer)

And other annoying symptoms which vary brand-to brand.

Read below:

The *correct* amount of HE (High Efficiency) detergent that should be used in any front load or agitatorless top load washer with tub sizes 3.0 cu ft and larger is as follows:

HE: (2) Tablespoons Per Wash Load

HE 2X: (1) Tablespoon

HE 3X: (1) Teaspoon

Perform a TUB CLEAN CYCLE every (4) months.

Use: "Tide Washing Machine Cleaner"

#6 john63

john63

    Dean of LG Appliantology

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,211 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 18 August 2014 - 01:29 AM

Correction: This was a DOE-mandate (not EPA)

 

Actually---it really doesn't make a difference which alphabet-soup-letters issued the law.

 

They're all birds-of-a-feather...

 

Bend over and comply.


To eliminate:

Musty odor

L-O-N-G cycle times

Dingy/yellowing whites

Suds error message

Slow spin speeds

Intermittent water leaks (from rear of washer)

And other annoying symptoms which vary brand-to brand.

Read below:

The *correct* amount of HE (High Efficiency) detergent that should be used in any front load or agitatorless top load washer with tub sizes 3.0 cu ft and larger is as follows:

HE: (2) Tablespoons Per Wash Load

HE 2X: (1) Tablespoon

HE 3X: (1) Teaspoon

Perform a TUB CLEAN CYCLE every (4) months.

Use: "Tide Washing Machine Cleaner"

#7 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Shōgun

  • Master Samurai Tech
  • 29,617 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Sapporo Original Draft Rice Lager

Posted 18 August 2014 - 09:33 AM

John, your posts naturally got me a little concerned over liability or, at least, the possibility regulatory harassment.  So I looked up the enforcement provisions in the Energy Star requirements.  

 

Turns out all the enforcement provisions in the Energy Star requirements are aimed at the manufacturers.  There is nothing in the published CFR about after-market modifications of Energy Star-labelled appliances.  There's plenty in the CFR, however, about enforcement provisions applicable to manufacturers who fail to comply with the standards and yet use the Energy Star mark on their products, including the new DOE enforcement provisions and department created in 2011.

 

The upshot of this is that it appears Frigidaire was engaging in the time-honored corporate practice of CYA.  Frigidaire was protecting their own asses by misleading the appliance servicer into thinking that he would be liable if he modified one of their crappy Energy Star washers in a customer's home.  This is another example of deliberate corporate misinformation in the name of protecting their own self interest.  



#8 olyteddy

olyteddy

    Kohai

  • Sublime Master of Appliantology
  • PipPipPip
  • 351 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Earl Grey

Posted 18 August 2014 - 09:39 AM

With the GE top loaders the override is built in. There's a pink section on the rinse dial that says 'Power Rinse / Fabric Softener'. That gives you the full rinse.



#9 john63

john63

    Dean of LG Appliantology

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,211 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 18 August 2014 - 09:46 AM

I agree.

 

However---if you're an authorized service center on a warranty call on behalf of the manufacturer---liability *may* be a concern.

 

The intent I believe---is to discourage modification with fear of potential legal action


To eliminate:

Musty odor

L-O-N-G cycle times

Dingy/yellowing whites

Suds error message

Slow spin speeds

Intermittent water leaks (from rear of washer)

And other annoying symptoms which vary brand-to brand.

Read below:

The *correct* amount of HE (High Efficiency) detergent that should be used in any front load or agitatorless top load washer with tub sizes 3.0 cu ft and larger is as follows:

HE: (2) Tablespoons Per Wash Load

HE 2X: (1) Tablespoon

HE 3X: (1) Teaspoon

Perform a TUB CLEAN CYCLE every (4) months.

Use: "Tide Washing Machine Cleaner"

#10 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Shōgun

  • Master Samurai Tech
  • 29,617 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Sapporo Original Draft Rice Lager

Posted 18 August 2014 - 09:48 AM

 

However---if you're an authorized service center on a warranty call on behalf of the manufacturer---liability *may* be a concern.

 

 

Ah, yes-- THIS I can see.  Depending on the "gotcha" language in the contract, either the DOE or the manufacturer may be able to go after you as an agent of the manufacturer.  







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: washer, water level, pressure switch, rinse

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Use the Appliantology Parts Finder to Get What You Need!
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

Your Sometimes-Lucid Host:
Samurai Appliance Repair Man
"If I can't help you fix your appliance and make you 100% satisfied, I will come to your home and slice open my belly,
spilling my steaming entrails onto your floor."


The Appliance Guru | Master Samurai Tech

Real Time Analytics