Jump to content


Learn appliance repair at the Samurai Tech Academy.  Learn more.  Earn more.


Use this Search Box to Find Appliance Repair Help Now
Need help finding your model number?
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!


FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Welcome to Appliantology.org, the Web's Premiere Appliance Repair Resource!

The world-famous Samurai Appliance Repair Forums


You can post a question and get repair help for FREE! Click here to get started.


Already a member of the Appliantology Academy? Just sign in with your username and password in the upper right-hand corner of the screen.

 


Photo

VamPLIERS anyone use them?


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 LLAMBERT

LLAMBERT

    Sōhei

  • Appliantologist
  • PipPipPip
  • 142 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Stone Ruination IPA

Posted 20 August 2014 - 08:31 AM

supposed to get out an stripped or rusted screw or bolt.


Why? I came into this game for the action, the excitement. Go anywhere, travel light, get in, get out, wherever there's trouble, a man alone. Now they got the whole country sectioned off, you can't make a move without a form

Use the Appliantology Parts Search Box to Find What You Need!
Enter your model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

#2 Squeaky Clean

Squeaky Clean

    Yamabushi

  • Professional Appliantologist
  • PipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Benchmark Bourbon (Old Number 8) on the rocks & glass of coke on the side

Posted 20 August 2014 - 10:29 AM

Yes, they work great! I own a piece of industrial equipment that is exposed to corrosive chemicals and they use lots of Torx head fasteners. I have removed completely hollowed fasteners with this tool. It does not get used much, but has saved hours of messing around with a bunged up Torx head. Price them well, I have see them with substantial discounts on some sites.

 

    http://www.amazon.co...ywords=vamplier


“I’m on a path of enlightenment and would like to become an appliance repair technician. I’m looking for any and all suggestions from those who have made this journey.”

 

 


#3 BEdwards

BEdwards

    Sōhei

  • Chief Appliantologist
  • PipPipPip
  • 150 posts
  • Location: USA

Posted 20 August 2014 - 03:44 PM

Look too cool. Just ordered a set, $34.97 plus free 2 day shipping. Like a kid in a candy store.



#4 nickfixit

nickfixit

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,184 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Glen Livit

Posted 30 August 2014 - 08:35 PM

Looks very interesting, could pay for itself in one use. Looks like it wouldn't help if the screw was in any sort of recess. Will it grip those crappy screws on Samsung washers?


" Giving numerical data to Sears management is like giving a monkey a machine gun. No one knows for certain what will happen, but you can be sure of two things... It will be real messy, and only the monkey will be unharmed"

#5 BryanS

BryanS

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,177 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:I don't drink

Posted 07 September 2014 - 07:40 AM

I just bought a pair of these about 2 months ago and finally used them last week. They worked pretty good at gripping a rounded out set screw in this customers door handle. Most pliers will slip right off when you grab with the point of the pliers, but these grip it pretty good.

#6 DADoESTX

DADoESTX

    Kohai

  • Master Appliantologist
  • PipPipPip
  • 335 posts
  • Flavorite Brew:Iced tea with a spike of earl grey

Posted 07 September 2014 - 08:09 AM

Bought one a few months ago, used it twice.  Did the job nicely.



#7 olyteddy

olyteddy

    Kohai

  • Sublime Master of Appliantology
  • PipPipPip
  • 342 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Earl Grey

Posted 07 September 2014 - 11:33 AM

Don says: I remember a torpedoman asking me for a Crescent Wrench. 
When I asked him what size; he said doesn't make any difference, I'm
going to use it as a hammer.

Some of this may be true. Judge for yourself.

DRILL PRESS:
A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock
out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer
across the room, denting the freshly-painted vertical stabilizer which you
had carefully set in the corner where nothing could get to it.

WIRE WHEEL:
Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench
with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprints and hard-earned calluses
from fingers in about the time it takes you to say, 'Oh sh--....'

ELECTRIC HAND DRILL:
Normally used for spinning pop rivets in their holes until you die of old age .

SKILL SAW:
A portable cutting tool used to make studs too short.

PLIERS:
Used to round off bolt heads. Sometimes used in the creation of blood-blisters.

BELT SANDER:
An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs into
major refinishing jobs.

HACKSAW:
One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle. It transforms
human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt
to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

VISE-GRIPS:
Generally used after pliers to completely round off bolt heads. If nothing else
is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm
of your hand.

WELDING GLOVES:
Heavy duty leather gloves used to prolong the conduction of intense welding
heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETYLENE TORCH:
Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your shop on
fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside the wheel hub out of which you
want to remove a bearing race.

TABLE SAW:
A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood projectiles for
testing wall integrity.

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering an automobile to the
ground after you have installed your new brake shoes, trapping the jack
h an dle firmly under the bumper.

EIGHT-FOOT LONG YELLOW PINE 2X4:
Used for levering an automobile upward off of a trapped hydraulic jack handle.

E-Z OUT BOLT AND STUD EXTRACTOR:
A tool ten times harder than any known drill bit that snaps neatly off in bolt
holes thereby ending any possible future use.

BAND SAW:
A large stationary power saw primarily used by most shops to cut good
aluminum sheet into smaller pieces that more easily fit into the trash can
after you cut on the inside of the line instead of the outside edge.

TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST:
A tool for testing the maximum tensile strength of everything you forgot to
disconnect.

CRAFTSMAN 1/2 x 24-INCH SCREWDRIVER:
A very large pry bar that inexplicably has an accurately machined screwdriver
tip on the end opposite the handle.

AVIATION METAL SNIPS:
See hacksaw.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER:
Normally used to stab the vacuum seals under lids or for opening old-style
paper-and-tin oil cans and splashing oil on your shirt; but can also be used,
as the name implies, to strip out Phillips screw heads.

STRAIGHT SCREWDRIVER:
A tool for opening paint cans. Sometimes used to convert common slotted
screws into non-removable screws.

PRY BAR:
A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed
to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part.

HOSE CUTTER:
A tool used to make hoses too short.

HAMMER:
Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is used as a
kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts adjacent the object we
are trying to hit.

MECHANIC'S KNIFE:
Used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard cartons delivered
to your front door; works particularly well on contents such as seats, vinyl
records, liquids in plastic bottles, collector magazines , refund checks, and
rubber or plastic parts. Especially useful for slicing work clothes, but only
while in use.

DAMMIT TOOL:
Any handy tool that you grab and throw across the garage while yelling
'DAMMIT' at the top of your lungs. It is also, most often, the next tool that you
will need.

:woot: 



#8 olyteddy

olyteddy

    Kohai

  • Sublime Master of Appliantology
  • PipPipPip
  • 342 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Earl Grey

Posted 07 September 2014 - 01:23 PM

http://youtu.be/WSNgd4PU7ZY


Edited by olyteddy, 07 September 2014 - 01:24 PM.


#9 Spannerwrench

Spannerwrench

    Senpai

  • Master Appliantologist
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 673 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Maxwell House > Black Crown > Crown Royal with Ginger Ale

Posted 07 September 2014 - 02:31 PM

I have regular size and the mini. They work well if you know how to use them.
"Suds are not good"
"They write directions for a reason"
"Make sure you're using it right before you say it's not working correctly"
"If if has a Diagnostic Test Cycle, Run it before and after you fix it!"
"Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results is insane"
"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong."

#10 Patricio

Patricio

    Opa

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,408 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Home brewed ice tea

Posted 08 September 2014 - 09:30 AM

Don says: I remember a torpedoman asking me for a Crescent Wrench. 
When I asked him what size; he said doesn't make any difference, I'm
going to use it as a hammer.

Some of this may be true. Judge for yourself.

DRILL PRESS:
A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock
out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer
across the room, denting the freshly-painted vertical stabilizer which you
had carefully set in the corner where nothing could get to it.

WIRE WHEEL:
Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench
with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprints and hard-earned calluses
from fingers in about the time it takes you to say, 'Oh sh--....'

ELECTRIC HAND DRILL:
Normally used for spinning pop rivets in their holes until you die of old age .

SKILL SAW:
A portable cutting tool used to make studs too short.

PLIERS:
Used to round off bolt heads. Sometimes used in the creation of blood-blisters.

BELT SANDER:
An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs into
major refinishing jobs.

HACKSAW:
One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle. It transforms
human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt
to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

VISE-GRIPS:
Generally used after pliers to completely round off bolt heads. If nothing else
is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm
of your hand.

WELDING GLOVES:
Heavy duty leather gloves used to prolong the conduction of intense welding
heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETYLENE TORCH:
Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your shop on
fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside the wheel hub out of which you
want to remove a bearing race.

TABLE SAW:
A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood projectiles for
testing wall integrity.

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering an automobile to the
ground after you have installed your new brake shoes, trapping the jack
h an dle firmly under the bumper.

EIGHT-FOOT LONG YELLOW PINE 2X4:
Used for levering an automobile upward off of a trapped hydraulic jack handle.

E-Z OUT BOLT AND STUD EXTRACTOR:
A tool ten times harder than any known drill bit that snaps neatly off in bolt
holes thereby ending any possible future use.

BAND SAW:
A large stationary power saw primarily used by most shops to cut good
aluminum sheet into smaller pieces that more easily fit into the trash can
after you cut on the inside of the line instead of the outside edge.

TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST:
A tool for testing the maximum tensile strength of everything you forgot to
disconnect.

CRAFTSMAN 1/2 x 24-INCH SCREWDRIVER:
A very large pry bar that inexplicably has an accurately machined screwdriver
tip on the end opposite the handle.

AVIATION METAL SNIPS:
See hacksaw.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER:
Normally used to stab the vacuum seals under lids or for opening old-style
paper-and-tin oil cans and splashing oil on your shirt; but can also be used,
as the name implies, to strip out Phillips screw heads.

STRAIGHT SCREWDRIVER:
A tool for opening paint cans. Sometimes used to convert common slotted
screws into non-removable screws.

PRY BAR:
A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed
to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part.

HOSE CUTTER:
A tool used to make hoses too short.

HAMMER:
Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is used as a
kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts adjacent the object we
are trying to hit.

MECHANIC'S KNIFE:
Used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard cartons delivered
to your front door; works particularly well on contents such as seats, vinyl
records, liquids in plastic bottles, collector magazines , refund checks, and
rubber or plastic parts. Especially useful for slicing work clothes, but only
while in use.

DAMMIT TOOL:
Any handy tool that you grab and throw across the garage while yelling
'DAMMIT' at the top of your lungs. It is also, most often, the next tool that you
will need.

:woot: 

Obviously words of experience


I see says the blind man, leading a lame dog, while talking to a deaf person. In other words, Not liable if you choose to follow my opinion.
IgonFishn




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Use the Appliantology Parts Finder to Get What You Need!
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

Your Sometimes-Lucid Host:
Samurai Appliance Repair Man
"If I can't help you fix your appliance and make you 100% satisfied, I will come to your home and slice open my belly,
spilling my steaming entrails onto your floor."


The Appliance Guru | Master Samurai Tech

Real Time Analytics