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Subzero Model 532 - Need reducing fittings for capillary tubes


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5 replies to this topic

#1 bsmith

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Posted Yesterday, 04:26 PM

I am changing out the evaporator coil on my old SZ Model 532 refrigerator. Bought a new evap coil off ebay and it came with tubing connections that would fit the existing suction line size, but the connection to fit the cap tube, although reduced down, is still too large for my cap tube. I thought about just brazing and "buttering" the gap between the cap tube and the evaporator inlet, but then I thought that maybe I could just go buy the proper sized conical reducer fitting that you typically see used when cap tubes are joined to small copper lines.

 

I went to a couple of my local HVAC supply houses including Gemaire and Johnson Supply and none of them even recognized an old sample I had of the conical reducer fittings which are commonly used with cap tubes. I went to my local SZ dealer and the parts department girl could not recognize the fitting and said come back in the morning and talk with one of their techs.

 

I then decided to go online and see if I could fine a source on these conical reducer fittings for cap tubes and after many search attempts, I found nothing! There are plenty of suppliers for cap tubes themselves, but I never saw a single fitting for adapting a cap tube to a standard sized copper tube. Can someone please give me a web link to where I can order a cap tube fitting?



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#2 KurtiusInterupptus

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Posted Yesterday, 04:57 PM

To what degree is the existing cone too big? I have had a lot of success just filling that gap with silver solder , even if it is slightly oversized...not aware of any source for these cones..
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#3 bsmith

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Posted Yesterday, 05:11 PM

To what degree is the existing cone too big? I have had a lot of success just filling that gap with silver solder , even if it is slightly oversized...not aware of any source for these cones..

In the one particular case I have, the excess size is too much for my preferred sta-brite 8 solder to fill (it requires tight fitting joints) but the slop on the fit is not too much for a sil-phos 15 or higher silver solder to fill so I will likely have to go with that. Since you see these cone fittings on filter/driers and evap coil connections, I had always thought they must be available to the public somewhere. I would sure like to have a few handy of various sizes so I sure hope someone can put us onto them.



#4 Spannerwrench

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Posted Yesterday, 05:43 PM

Simply insert the cap tube into the evap about 3/4 inch, pinch the corners of the evap inlet with pliers, and then braze it. There's no need for a special reducer, the refrigerant is going to do the same thing. I've done it plenty of times.
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#5 bsmith

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Posted Yesterday, 06:40 PM

Simply insert the cap tube into the evap about 3/4 inch, pinch the corners of the evap inlet with pliers, and then braze it. There's no need for a special reducer, the refrigerant is going to do the same thing. I've done it plenty of times.

From what you describe, Spanner, it sounds like even very large size discrepancies can be handled when fitting cap tubes to evap inlets. I will go ahead and braze it as you explained. But still, just as a matter of curiosity, I wish I knew if those cone fittings were available somewhere. You see them on enough devices that you know someone has to make them.



#6 woftam

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Posted Today, 04:56 PM

Simply insert the cap tube into the evap about 3/4 inch, pinch the corners of the evap inlet with pliers, and then braze it. There's no need for a special reducer, the refrigerant is going to do the same thing. I've done it plenty of times.


This works but I'm curious about evaporator you bought. Correct evaporator for 532 shouldn't need this. What part number did you get? Were rubber caps on new evap?
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