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whirlpool fridge et8wtmxkq07 compressor not running


21 replies to this topic

#1 coolhandkenny

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 03:08 PM

Whirlpool et8wtmxkq07 compressor not running do not see a capacitor on in don't think it comes with one has 120, overload has continuity and replace start relay ohms checkout 4 from c/r, 10 from c/s, and 14 from r/s. Which technically makes its good electrically. Think compressor is just bad but to me those are pretty high ohms but it doesn't have a start assist or capacitor, any suggestions from my Guru's? Didn't see this in downloads either so couldn't double check.

Edited by coolhandkenny, 19 September 2014 - 03:21 PM.

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#2 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 03:58 PM

Even if it had a capacitor, it wouldn't have anything to do with starting because it would just be a run capacity to improve the power factor (energy efficiency).  

 

Does the compressor try to start (hum, draw high amps, 11-ish) when trying to start it with the new relay?



#3 coolhandkenny

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 03:59 PM

Nope nothing.

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#4 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 04:02 PM

Are you getting voltage to the common lead on the compressor?  



#5 coolhandkenny

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 04:03 PM

When I was mentioning the capacitor I was trying to say that's why it probably had high ohms
Yes it's getting 120

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#6 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 04:09 PM

What's the part number of the start device or relay you replaced?



#7 coolhandkenny

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 04:27 PM

Part # is 213514105


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#8 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 06:28 PM

Part # is 213514105

 

 

Not a valid part number.



#9 lvasquez11

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 11:16 PM

Part number: 4387938

Part number: 4387938

 is relay kit 


Edited by Samurai Appliance Repair Man, 20 September 2014 - 07:36 AM.


#10 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 07:37 AM

Part number: 4387938

Part number: 4387938

 is relay kit 

 

 

Yes, but I want to know the part number of the kit he actually used.  



#11 coolhandkenny

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 08:55 AM

Thanks samurai sorry for the misunderstanding it's the same number I sent the part number of the compressor relay not the entire kit but it's the same one... I think compressor is shot
Well be back at shop on Monday Will give update gave them emergency fridge so they should be cool until Monday

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#12 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 09:19 AM

 I think compressor is shot
 

 

 

Doesn't make sense for that to be the case-- if both windings are good and it's getting voltage, then the compressor would at least hum and draw LR amps.  

 

Did you test the overload for continuity?



#13 coolhandkenny

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 09:20 AM

Yes it has continuity and even the ohms equal each other

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#14 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 06:06 PM

You may have an open neutral.  Check continuity of the white wire on the relay to the neutral spade on the power cord.  



#15 coolhandkenny

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 06:37 PM

Okay will check, but I checked the cords on hot and neural going to the compressorand got 120 does that still means I can have an open neutral?

Edited by coolhandkenny, 20 September 2014 - 06:38 PM.

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#16 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 06:48 PM

I checked the cords on hot and neural going to the compressorand got 120 does that still means I can have an open neutral?

 

If using a digital meter, yes and I have been bitten by this very snake.  Your meter may still tell you that you have 120vac at a load supply even with an open neutral.  But meters are specifically designed to be high impedance input, meaning they don't load the circuit and so don't require current flow to measure voltage.  In an open neutral circuit, you'll still measure voltage but  because the neutral is open, current can't flow so actual work, like running a compressor motor, can't be done.  For this very reason, I carry a loading-type meter like this one,  that deliberately applies a load to the circuit to measure voltage.  I use it to check for open neutrals, the bane of our existence.  



#17 coolhandkenny

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 07:18 PM

Wow it applies a load to detect an open neutral just put that on my wish list.. but I so love field piece that I feel wrong using a fluke haha

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#18 Maytag1

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Posted Yesterday, 08:48 AM

Did you check power while the line was plugged into the compressor? I'm with the Samurai - you should be pulling current if nothing is open and you have 120v to the load.  Sounds like you may have 120v with load not plugged in.



#19 coolhandkenny

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Posted Today, 08:53 AM

There is continuity between the neutral

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#20 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted Today, 09:04 AM

No, you gotta be missing something.  I'm not buying a bad compressor at this point.  Does the light come on inside the refrigerator?  That would at least prove that the outlet is good.  

 

The other thing to do is bypass the fridge wiring altogether and hotwire the compressor using a cheater cord and 3-in-1.






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