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Whirlpool Gold GD25DIXHS02 - defrost heater 2323198


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16 replies to this topic

#1 dcraven

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 10:14 AM

I'm trying to determine if my calrod type defrost heater, part #Part number: 2323198

Part number: 2323198

is the reason for my GFI tripping when the fridge goes into the defrost cycle. From terminal to terminal the heater when removed from the fridge reads ~24 ohms.  The available online information I've found says it's good from just that and stops there. From any of the two terminals to the outer metal casing I also have continuity. A friend told me the inner element should be insulated from the outer, and over time the insulation breaks down.  If that's true then I've found my short and reason it's tripping the GFI as the defrost heater contacts the coils which are grounded. 

 

Question is though, when I called Whirlpool, a technician there said you just can't plug that fridge into a GFCI as stated in the manual.  So I'm wondering which is it and who is right?  Working as designed?



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#2 BryanS

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 10:29 AM

You aren't supposed to plug a fridge into a gfci. What I would do is run it to a plug that isn't on that gfci and see what it does when you put it in defrost. I've had customers with weak gfci and it trips easily. Your heater will be drawing some amperage, so if the circuit is weak it may trip.

#3 Applianceman97

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 10:36 AM

I agree with Bryan!

I have had many refrigerators that trip a GFI (should be plugged into a GFI) that when plugged into a regular outlet never have a problem again.

Make sure the new outlet you use is not wired in with the GFI. The GFI outlet will be at the beginning of the string of outlets so if your on the same circuit you can still trip that same GFi outlet.
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#4 dcraven

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 11:24 AM

I tested it on a non-GFI and then forced it into the defrost cycle, no problem the defrost heater gets hot immediately.  Only problem leaving it that way is the non-GFI outlet is a drop from the ceiling in the middle of the garage and I had to use a heavy duty extension cord.  I'll probably end up adding a dedicated outlet for the fridge in the garage, but I'm really curious as to whether the defrost heater is supposed to have continuity from the terminals to the outer casing.  I tried calling a local appliance parts place to see I could bring a multimeter and test one before buying it but they said no.



#5 BryanS

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 05:45 PM

I'll test one at work and let you know if I don't forget. I don't believe you should get continuity from the sheathing to the terminals. I've never needed to test a heater from the outside casing to a terminal.

#6 Gnominator77

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 05:53 PM

No, it shouldn't have any continuity from the terminals to the outer casing. If you are getting any reading at all from either one of the terminals to the casing, its shorted. Just like an element in an oven or on a stovetop. Make sure you are isolating the heater from the circuit when testing. 



#7 MicaBay

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 08:03 PM

I tested it on a non-GFI and then forced it into the defrost cycle, no problem the defrost heater gets hot immediately. Only problem leaving it that way is the non-GFI outlet is a drop from the ceiling in the middle of the garage and I had to use a heavy duty extension cord. I'll probably end up adding a dedicated outlet for the fridge in the garage, but I'm really curious as to whether the defrost heater is supposed to have continuity from the terminals to the outer casing. I tried calling a local appliance parts place to see I could bring a multimeter and test one before buying it but they said no.


No it should be compleatly open from the terminals to the outer casing. As you can see many techs would have dismissed the GFCI as the problem, where the heater is your main problem. Good catch!! The GFCI was jus doing the job it was designed to do.

According the the 2014 NEC (national electric code) all recepicles in the garage need to be GFCI. It would be best to check with your local miniciple code office to fine out for sure before replacing any GFCI or AFCI recepicles.

#8 Maytag1

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 09:03 PM

When I built my house, I had the electrician wire a circuit that wasn't hooked up so I could have a dedicated non gfci circuit for my ref I hooked up after final inspection. Older refs and gfci's don't mix. That being said, he can likely replace the heater, but any moisture in cabinet can also conduct power to ground. Also as the Samari has pointed out, compressor windings can bleed a little power to ground and trip gfci but run perfectly safe on normal grounded non gfci circuit

#9 dcraven

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Posted 24 September 2014 - 10:49 AM

Thanks everyone, I ordered online a new defrost heater and will do the same continuity checks when I get it to compare with the old one.  I'll post the results here as someone else might have the same questions.  I saw another explanation besides the insulation breaking down that makes sense as to why there would be continuity from the terminals to the outer casing.  Over time moisture could get past the seals defeating the purpose of the insulation.



#10 MicaBay

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Posted 24 September 2014 - 10:02 PM

When I built my house, I had the electrician wire a circuit that wasn't hooked up so I could have a dedicated non gfci circuit for my ref I hooked up after final inspection. Older refs and gfci's don't mix. That being said, he can likely replace the heater, but any moisture in cabinet can also conduct power to ground. Also as the Samari has pointed out, compressor windings can bleed a little power to ground and trip gfci but run perfectly safe on normal grounded non gfci circuit

. What he can safely do, should do and what can legally be done aren't always the same. The NEC changes every 3 or 4 years. If he makes a change that doesn't alight with the code, it could have a negative effect if he ever goes to sell the home.

#11 Maytag1

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Posted 24 September 2014 - 10:22 PM

Simple enough to reinstall a gfci but plenty safe and very reliable to run a freezer and ref in my garage

#12 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 07:43 PM

The manufacturers all say to not plug a refrigerator into a GFCI because of nuisance tripping.  It's right in the Use and Care guide (that no one reads :blinky: ).  

 


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#13 MicaBay

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Posted 28 September 2014 - 10:42 AM

I was wrong!  Just read the NEC  This is  Article 210.8(A)(2) where it talks about GFCI in garages.  There appears to be two exceptions....

 

(A) All Occupancies. All 125-volt, single -phase, 15

and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the

locations specified in (1) through (9) shall have

ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for

personnel.

(1) Bathrooms

(2) Garages, and also accessory building that have a

floor located at or below grade level not intended

as habitable rooms and limited to storage area,

work areas, and areas of similar use

Exception No. 1 to (2): Receptacles that are not

readily accessible.

Exception No.2 to (2): A single receptacle or a

duplex receptacle for two appliances located within

dedicated for each appliance that, in normal use, is

not easily moved from one place to another and that

is cord-and-plug connected in accordance with

400.7(A)(6), (A)(7), OR (A)(8).

 

 

So if you put your fridge on a dedicated circuit, only one receptacle for that breaker and nothing else, you don't have to have it on a GFCI.


Edited by MicaBay, 28 September 2014 - 10:43 AM.


#14 Maytag1

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Posted 28 September 2014 - 01:44 PM

Awesome info

#15 dcraven

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 08:45 AM

I got the new defrost heater yesterday and tested it for continuity.  From terminal to terminal as you'd expect it's closed.  If anyone was still wondering, from terminal to outer casing on the new one it's open, on the old one it was closed.  Installing the new defrost heater everything is working well.  I forced it into the defrost cycle and it did not pop the GFI.  While I'd install a standard dedicated outlet if I ever decide to store meat in the fridge, for cheap beer and water bottles I'm good.

 

Thanks for everyone's input on this.  Here is a picture of the old defrost heater which I cut in half. 

 

QDXofv4.jpg

 

It confirms what my friend told me, there is an inner element separated from the outer casing by a non-conductive ceramic type layer.



#16 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 04 October 2014 - 05:41 AM

If you pull apart the rubberized coated ends where the leads attach you will most likely find your source of power leakage to ground - one or possibly both will probably have signs of corrision from moisture getting into the ends.


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#17 dcraven

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Posted Today, 09:56 AM

A friend has run into a similar problem with a Kenmore 59792990 which uses an electronic ADC board.  When the fridge goes into the defrost cycle it doesn't come out, this while running on a non-GFCI outlet.  I checked the defrost heater and while it had continuity from terminal to terminal, it also had continuity from the terminal to outer casing.  I told her to order the new heater, 2323198 and then I'd install it.  While waiting for the new part I disconnected the defrost heater to see if that holds her over til the part comes in. 

 

Anyone know why it would get stuck in defrost mode because of the shorted defrost heater?  I'm waiting to hear back from her as to the effect of disconnecting the heater.






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