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Dacor CPS230 double wall oven - top oven not heating


20 replies to this topic

#1 savymom

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Posted 31 October 2014 - 09:07 PM

My top oven stop heating. Fan works, display is fine, but no heating in either bake or broil setting. I do hear the normal clicks its suppose to make when I turn it on and the bottom oven is working fine.

After reading several posts like mine, everyone mentioned the high-limit switch. So, I opened my oven and push down on the red button  but the problem still persists. I tried it several times. However, I never hear the "click" others describe when I depress the button. I'm thinking either it was not tripped to begin with or I need to press it really hard (the button is level with its casing surrounding and not sticking out). Or perhaps that is not my problem. In that case, any suggestions? Appreciate any help.

 

 



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#2 vee8power

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 07:41 AM

If the bottom oven works, I would focus first on that high limit switch first. We need to find out if it has continuity.



#3 savymom

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 10:06 AM

I don't own a multi-meter so I guess I'll need to get an appliance guy in to help with that?



#4 savymom

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 10:19 AM

I'll be happy to buy a multi-meter if you can guide me on how to use it to test the high-limit switch on the oven. Too much to ask?



#5 vee8power

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 11:12 AM

Kill the power to the oven so you don't get lit up, pull off one of the wires on the high limit. Then set your meter to continuity or ohms and press one meter lead to each of the 2  terminals on the high limit. A bad limit will show as OL or whatever your meter says that means open.

There is a wealth of information on this:

http://fixitnow.com/oven-repair-faq/

http://fixitnow.com/...pliance-repair/


Edited by vee8power, 01 November 2014 - 11:13 AM.


#6 savymom

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 03:02 PM

I bought a multi-meter and a continuity meter. I tested the switch with both and there is continuity. Now what?



#7 vee8power

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 09:57 PM

Can you hear two clicks when you first program a bake cycle? The next thing is live voltage tests. Did your multimeter come with insulated alligator clip leads?


Edited by vee8power, 03 November 2014 - 10:01 PM.


#8 savymom

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 05:28 PM

Yes, I hear the clicks. No, my meter did not come with the alligator clips. Do I need to buy those? 



#9 vee8power

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 07:28 PM

Can you make something like this to bypass that high limit with? Even though it's showing continuity, that high limit is the prime suspect for none of the elements not working in one oven. Use something like this to bypass the hi limit. It must be a solid, insulated connection; don't user a paper clip or merely tape the terminals together. Then turn the power back on and try the oven with it bypassed.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSdbbGZx8UpETrljJEMGEB


Edited by vee8power, 04 November 2014 - 07:28 PM.


#10 vee8power

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 08:57 AM

Sometimes, those thermostats can show continuity with the tiny load the meter puts on it, but fail with a full load. Another way to check this is to start a cycle and look for 240 volts AC across the wires connected to the hi limit. Be careful.This is where I recommend alligator clips and connect them with the power off.. If you see significant voltage, then the switch is open under load. Replace it.

When doing these live voltage tests, it is recommended that you have had the appropriate amount of coffee. You want to be fully alert but not so much that your hands are shaking.

BTW, switch, thermostat, and hi-limit are all terms referring to the same thing- the thing with the little button on it.



#11 savymom

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 01:20 PM

I am going to get the alligator clips and do the volt test. My digital meter has 200 and 500 voltage settings. Should I use the 200?

I don't drink coffeee, but I get your point. Thanks for the humor...  :-)



#12 savymom

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 04:51 PM

I got the alligator clips and did the voltage test but it register zero. I did the test on the switch on the lower oven(the ones that works) and it still register zero. So I am thinking the alligator clips are not fitting my meter correctly. However, I did a continuity test with the clips on and it did register .2. That should be okay,right? I also tested the voltage of a 120 outlet with the meter(no alligator clips)  and it register 120 so my meter works. So the meter is working but I'm thinking the alligator clips are not working or I'm doing something wrong. 

My process: with main power off, I connected the clips to each side of switch. I turned the main power on and then turned on the oven to bake.

 

BTW, I also got the connectors to do the little bypass device you suggested. Is a 16 gauge cable good enough to use?



#13 vee8power

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 08:15 AM

The range you set your meter on should be more than what you expect to see; so, yes, the 500 volt setting, we're looking for 240 volts here. 16ga, wire is ok for a short test. Zero volts across a hi-limit indicate that it is closed(good); sounds like your hi-limits are good.

This whole process assumes that everything went out at once, no heat on bake, broil or pure convection, right? It's unlikely the elements all burned out at once so we're down to the oven control, the relay board, or the wiring. Look at all the wiring there in the top; see anything burnt or dis-connected? 

It's hard to get meter leads on those relays so we'll diagnose the relay board by process of elimination.

To test the oven control, look for 24 volts DC across pins 1-3 and 2-5 on the 16 pin connector on the control during bake.Set you meter to the lowest dc volt range above 24.The pins go 1 through 16 from left to right; make sure to get the leads on the metal conductors. If you have something like 24 volts dc between both pairs and no heat, then it sounds like the relay board is bad.

Part number: AP3853218

Part number: AP3853218



#14 Budget Appliance Repair

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 08:28 AM

There is a really good chance that if you determine that it is the relay board causing the problem it very well could be just a bad solder connection on the DBL - double line break relay.   The DBL relay would cause a loose of power to all the elements at the same time.

 

You could remove the two wires from the top of the DLB relay and connect them together with the jumper wire that you made to bypass the thermal cutout fuse then try a bake function and see if the element heats.

 

If it works with the DBL relay bypassed pull the board and inspect the back of it and see if there are any burnt relay solder connections - again most likely on DBL relay, clean them up by scrapping any carbon build-up off as best as you can with a razor knife then heat and reflow a little solder on the bad connections.


Edited by Budget Appliance Repair, 06 November 2014 - 08:28 AM.

William Burk (Willie)
Willie's Budget Appliance Repair
Eureka, CA 95501

#15 savymom

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 12:28 PM

I was hoping it was the switch, much cheaper than relay board.

vee8power - To answer your question, yes, all the elements on the top oven went off at once. I had already replaced the bake element on both ovens not too long ago because they were chipped(cracked) and were not heating as well. After that replacement, we have use both ovens and the top oven almost every day and everything was working fine until it all went out.

 

So, I opened the top panel to check the relay boards. Using a flashlight, I glanced over the main relay board. All connections seem fine, but under closer inspection I noticed that one of the resistors or transistors(?not sure of name) looks like it blew up - dark stain underneath it too. Location seems to be r1,c2. I guess a new board it is. Bummer!

 

Now my question-  how difficult is board to take out and replace? Is this a job a "grasshopper" like me can handle? There are a lot of cables connected to this board. I may need to start drinking coffee before I can attack this.

 

THANK YOU SO MUCH VEE8POWER for all your help in diagnosing the problem. I have certainly learned alot!! Any last words??



#16 vee8power

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Posted 07 November 2014 - 07:47 AM

It's just a matter of changing the wires one at a time onto the new board. Remove any parts necessary to get the board out. If I remember right, you can move the cover over the relay board enough if you move the oven away from the wall some. You may need help handling the weight; even each door is heavy. On most repairs on wall ovens, I take off the doors first; yours is simple, look at the hinges. This eliminates a lot of weight and lets you and your helper get closer for more leverage. Order it from the link above to support this site. They have an unbeatable return policy. Good luck! 

If you find the part significantly cheaper somewhere, be afraid... very afraid, This is an expensive part, even wholesale.


Edited by vee8power, 07 November 2014 - 07:54 AM.


#17 savymom

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Posted 07 November 2014 - 05:04 PM

 My hubby has been so impressed with my work and initiative, he now wants to try to replace the bad transistor. He knows how to solder. I figure we have nothing to loose. If that does not work, then we will get a new board. I'm taking pictures of everything first!

 

And yes, if needed, I'm going to buy it from the link above. Actually, I bought my elements from them as well. Fast service and good quality!!!

 

 I'll report on results.  

 

Thanks again!!!



#18 savymom

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 09:06 PM

Hi vee8power,

 

Well, I took the relay board out with the help of my hubby and we noticed that the DLB relay was fried inside. It also failed the continuity test. We also tested the r1 transistor that seemed to be fried as well but continuity was fine. So, I ordered a replacement for the DLB ($12 w/shipping)  thru Mouser Electronics(only place that had it) and my hubby solder the new piece in place.

 

I'm happy to report that the oven came alive again! Everything is working fine now. Not bad for a grasshoppah!!! My hubby was very happy too- saved him tons of money not having to call the service technician.

 

I want to thank you again for your AWESOME guidance!! One more skill I can put in my savymom resume... :-)

 

picture of bad DLB:



#19 savymom

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 09:17 PM



#20 vee8power

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 12:02 AM

Yeah, good job! I was happy to help. It was Willie's idea to repair the board though. I didn't think of that. I'm glad it worked out.






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