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Too much detergent... dishwasher won't drain!


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27 replies to this topic

#1 Lurker_Glaurung_*

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 01:58 PM

I used too much liquid detergent in my Kenmore Ultra Wash III, and it began to leak soap suds. I've since been unable to get it to drain - I'm terrible with these things - and if I try to run a rinse cycle it leaks bubbles after a minute. At present it's half full with suds at any given time. Any help would be appreciated. I'm at a loss as to how to proceed.

Thanks so much.
Justin

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#2 kingsx

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 03:02 PM

So sorry to hear that.

Probably not too much liquid detergent,

but the wrong kind which is meant for pots and pans in sinks.

otherworldly liquid dish soap is bad news

You must get it all out.

I would add cold water from a pan and continue to drain it for ten, or five hundred times...

depending on how viscous the soap and the quantity added.

advance the timer slowly and hear the motor stop  -


next,  it starts again - this is the drain cycle

 good luck
  


#3 Jedi Appliance Guy

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 04:43 PM

   In this situation we must use the Force.  Do not stop to think, just believe what I tell you.  Go to your bathroom and grab the bar soap.  Just about any soap will do.  Dial, Ivory, Irish spring, Dove what ever as long as its not some weird crap you can see through.

    Put the bar soap in the silverware basket.  You might need a towel in front of the kick plate.  About 2 or 3 fill, wash, drains is all it will take to rid your dishwasher of suds.

     Most of the time it caused by the wrong kind of soap finding its way into your dishwasher.  Usually with help from the operator.

     Sometimes it's caused by the right soap that has gone bad, or was not mixed properly from the beginning.  Sometimes it's a bad batch of rinse agent that causes the suds.

      This technology will also work in your Jacuzzi if applied correctly.  How do you think I learned it.



#4 Pegi

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 05:28 PM

About a 1/2 cup of salt poured into your dishwasher will also help break up the bubbles. It will have to recirculate the water to do so.  Have lots of towels ready tho.  Liquid fabirc softner will do this also but I do not think you want this inside of your dishwasher.  Be sure to use D/W powdered detergent in the future, has anti foaming agents.  The liquid and jells do also but causes problems so do not use these.
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#5 nickfixit

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 05:36 PM

put a half cup of vegitable oil in and run it. that will kill the suds
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#6 exsearsguy

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 09:02 PM

Nick's fix is the one I use. Some times it does take more than one try though.

#7 kingsx

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Posted 12 May 2005 - 04:10 AM

Great advice fellows.

I've only seen this half a dozen times in 25 years, now I know what to do next time.

I'm never too old to learn a new trick, 

Yes,  Jedi,   uuhm to some we have cleaned up after - yes-

to some - the force is a hammer yes -

... and a pair of pliers
 




#8 rubbercat

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Posted 12 May 2005 - 12:44 PM

What about the old fabric softener trick from the laundry?

Never tried it in a dishwasher.. but we all know it works in the wash.. !


#9 11fingersofdeath

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Posted 13 May 2005 - 03:29 PM

Fats are the sworn, mortal enemy of foams. It's a chemical thing. The vegetable oil trick is the easiest / fastest fix for this problem.

As an aside, this is why you have to make sure your bowls are scrupulously clean when making whipped cream or whipping egg whites. Also, this is why you should use a metal or glass bowl when whipping egg whites.

Plastics are chemically close enough relatives to fats that they stick together so well that you can't really get them clean enough to get a good egg foam for an angel food cake, souffle, or meringue in a plastic bowl.

To clean a metal or glass bowl _really_ well for a very important egg foam, wipe the bowl down with a few drops of vinegar in water on a paper towel.

(hey, you gotta get the dishes dirty somehow :D )

#10 Kiwi-nadian

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Posted 28 May 2005 - 01:01 AM

Malt vinegar or milk are two I use as they are generally avaliable at the time of repair.  The best one I have seen was when a esteemed japanese customer put powder from the laundry into the dishwasher when his wife was away for the weekend.....very messy!
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#11 Lurker_LONELY BACHELOR_*

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 10:25 PM

Thank you so much for your help. Because I am a lonely bachelor, I had no idea what to do when I almost ruined my apartment flooring. Thanks to you and some genious girl-friends....the problem was fixed!!!!

#12 exsearsguy

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Posted 10 June 2005 - 09:04 PM

Slightly off topic,but if  a grasshopper is out there wondering what to use in an emergency (like I forgot to pickup dishwasher detergent) plain old clorox works very well.

#13 ryan_975

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Posted 13 June 2005 - 01:43 PM

Except Chlorox (in as little as just a 1:100 mix) likes to eat rubber and soft plastic if left in contact for more than two minutes.  Also mixed with HOT water Chlorox makes very nasty  fumes.  Learned that from working in a healthcare facility. Before that I always mopped my kitchen floor with Chorox and hot water.  No wonder I always had a headache after that.  Always thought it the fact I had to do work. :)

Ryan

 

PS 1:100 mix would be 1 cup Chlorox (not Ultra) mixed with 6.25 gallons of water. 





#14 zauber1

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Posted 15 June 2005 - 12:34 PM

Two cups of vinegar (plain white distilled) gives enough acetic acid (5%) to dissipate all the bubbles left behind by the alkaline detergent.

 

You may also need to check your water hardness in your area.  You can do that by calling the utility company you pay your water bill to.  If the water is soft (under 3 grains per gallon) the foaming will last longer and more frequently.


#15 Lurker_iceyman_*

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Posted 19 June 2005 - 06:40 PM

[user=2]Jedi Appliance Guy[/user] wrote:

   In this situation we must use the force.  Do not stop to think, just believe what I tell you.  Go to your bathroom and grab the bar soap.  Just about any soap will do.  Dial, Ivory, Irish spring, Dove what ever as long as its not some weird crap you can see through.

    Put the bar soap in the silverware basket.  You might need a towel in front of the kick plate.  About 2 or 3 fill, wash, drains is all it will take to rid your dishwasher of suds

 

This worked incredibly well for me.


#16 Jedi Appliance Guy

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Posted 20 June 2005 - 05:16 PM

   Iceyman.  I know it worked well.  Thank you for posting that.  Really.  There are a number of solutions that work.  The best one is the easiest and least expensive.  

   I haven't tried the oil one yet, but from what I've read I'm sure it works well.  Next time I get a customer with an over sudsed dishwasher and all they have in the house is "see thru soap" I'll hit em up for some oil and try it.


#17 Lurker_sir sudz-a-lot_*

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 08:55 PM

Nickfixit's oil idea worked well. I had to clear out some of the excess suds and water first. and had to use more than 1/2 cup of oil. but oil did the trick. didn't spew more suds at all. thanks.

#18 Lurker_family_*

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 05:44 AM

:( I just need answers to a science project that i have

#19 Pegi

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 07:24 AM

What are the questions??
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#20 bigger hammer

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 09:11 PM

i am a user of the cooking oil technique too....i go 1 tablespoon at a time.....and canola oil seems to be the winner haha

although jedi's way sounds just as effective i wouldnt wanna ask a customer for their bar of soap from their bathroom as it may have gross curly butt hairs on it :P

Before you start.....how much is it going to cost and how long is it going to take?




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