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luvmyfl

Fast Spin Cycle Problem

14 posts in this topic

Hello we own a frigidaire  front load washer, model number FWT425RHS.  We've had it for 4 years.  Recently we noticed that laundry loads were taking well over an hour (1 hr and 15 minutes, sometimes longer - is this normal???) to complete and more loads were either not fully dried or in some cases we had to stop the washer or it would have went on forever.  After watching it in action, particularly the fast spin cycles, we noticed occasionaly the tub would begin to spin quickly and then shut down within a couple of seconds.  We are not sure if this is supposed to happen, but I don't think so because the loads occasionally come out wet and as mentioned earlier, we sometimes have to shut the wash cycle off manually.   We haven't changed the way we wash over the last 4 years.  We wash in all temperature settings.  Our loads normally are about the same size.  We figured perhaps the loads were'nt balanced, but the problem seems more frequent now.  Is there an out-of-balance sensor problem and why would this problem be more apparent now?  Will this be expensive to repair if indeed it is repairable?  We spoke to an appliance  repairman  and he indicated the bearings were going because we used regular detergent, rather than HE and that our cold water temperature was too cold (we wash in all temperatures and use both HE and regular detergent).  This sounds a bit odd.  He said it would cost us about $700 to repair.  A new washer costs that much!!!!  We didn't pay him and mentioned we would get a second opinion. Help!!

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

I'll bet it's not pumping out all the way. Could be something stuck in the pump's suction hose or the pump itself is going wonky (that's a technical term reserved for us Master Appliantologists; please don't use it at home because I cannot predict how it may be interpreted.)

If I was on the service call, I'd let the washer fill and start tumbling, then I'd advance the timer to spin and lift the drain hose so I could gaze lovingly upon the disharge stream-- I'm looking for a stream that's the same diameter as the hose, full and strong. If it dribbles, be sure to shake it... er, I mean, there's a problem somewhere in the pump system.

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Unable to find FWT425RHS in the existing selling list?

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Thanks.   As you suggested, we watched the the water discharge from the hose and it appears to flow normally.  So we're back to square one.  Incidentally, some loads spin fine while others don't.  In some cases, the spin cycle begins but after 2 or three accelerating spins, it shuts down.  Can you tell me if there is a load balance sensor problem. Is there a belt tension problem?  Is any of this possibly related to bearing problems. Any advice greatly appreciated.

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This sounds alot like a speed control board problem. remove the fron quarter panel and you'll find the tech sheet tucked away in there. Remove it and it explains some tests you need to do to test the speed control board.

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4 years old frigidaire front load washer:

a) bearing problem.

B) load balance sensor problem.

c) belt tension problem.

d) speed control board problem.

Recommendations

If ©, adjust it immediately (DIY no cost).

If (B), replace sensor.

If (d), follow our Grand Master.

If (a), dumb it.

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Thanks for the tip on the speed control sensor, although I did not see a tech sheet.  I did a bit more trouble shooting and after having removed the top and lower front panel so I could see the tub during the spin cycle, I noticed that the tub when beginning its fast spin cycle would start to wobble something fierce and after a couple of spins would shut down.  I tried this with different wash load weights, ie. light weight clothing, heavy weight clothing and half and full load types.  What I noticed was a full load of light weight clothing was able to complete the fast spin without wobbling too much.  The other loads wobbled considerably when trying to engage the fast spin cycle and when out of balance tolerance the drive belt motor would shut down.  So I applied pressure to the tub just prior to it engaging the fast spin cycle by pushing down and steadying the tub.  The fast spin cycle engaged and continued to spin at high rpm, but when I released the tub it began to wobble uncontrollably and the drivebelt motor shut down.  Only in the last month after 4 years of washing in all configurations does the fast spin cycle not work in unbalanced heavy loads.  This now leads me to a couple of assumptions I need you to help me confirm.

a. its not a bearing problem (spin cycle does work in certain load/weight configurations),

b. the belt tension appears to be adequate (no slippage or slack noticed),

c. not a speed control sensor (speeds are consistent in all configurations)

d. THIS IS A TUB VIBRATION PROBLEM!!!  The 2 upper spings holding the tub and 2 lower shocks cushioning the tub have lost their dampening characteristics.  When the tub is not ideally balanced it will not fast spin.  (the last 2 years my daughters have been doing their own wash and I suspect stuffing the tub to the point where the springs and shocks have been pushed beyond their limits)

Conclusuon:  Replace with NEW SPRINGS AND SHOCKS , ensure adequate, but not necessarily ideal weight balance when washing and the fast spin cycle should once again engage.

Question:  Does this sound reasonable, and if so, is this expensive/difficult to replace myself? 

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Wanderful! You found the cause.

The springs should be OK.

The dampers most likey are bad and lose their damping capabilty. Are they the frictional type? May need replacing only these dampers.

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I believe they are frictional, but to be sure here's a snaphot.  What do they normally cost and can I install myself?

post-734-129045084932_thumb.jpg

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O! What a plastic and flimsy frictional slider?

You are lucky that they last till now.

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You could get two from below (about $20 each) and DIY (20 min job)

Part No 406897 - Tub leveling shock absorber

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Before you buy any parts....

Is your washer on a wooden floor? If so, the 4 years of washer use may have stressed ( fatigued ) the floor and made it flexible. When the washers suspension tries to transmit the spinning energy to the base(feet), the floor compresses and springs back. End result, much vibration and most machines will not go to highest spin speed.

If this is the case, new shocks and springs will not help. It might even be worse with the new parts.

Put a glass half full of water on the floor a couple feet in front of the machine. Run a spin cycle with a load of clothes. Watch the water during spin, if you see it moving all around your floor is weakened.

Good luck.

Nick

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The washer is actually on a tile flooring.  The laundry room, however, is located on the second floor level so there is bound to be some vibration.  With any wooden floor I would imagine there is always vibration transmitted from the machine during the spin cycle, and I think that the manufacturers didn't mean only for this machine to be placed on concrete.  I'll check the floor, but I think it is fine.  With that said is there something additional I can place under the machine to dampen the effect further?

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I advise all my customers with F/loader washers on wooden floors to buy a large concrete paving slab( a big square piece of concrete about 1.5/2inches thick and place (gently) the washer on this .  All have said it doesnt make as much noise and or move around the floor.( It also raises the height of the door opening for the oldies:snooze:)

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