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Kenmore Dishwasher water level


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6 replies to this topic

#1 Kipper

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 11:07 AM

Kenmore Dishwasher 665.1677993.  Symptoms: filmy glassware, flatware, less than sparkling results.

Tried: Reading everything, everywhere - most say 'buy new inlet valve'.  Float switch works, inlet valve clean and working, inlet water flows.

The story: left to its own devices the dishwasher fills about half way to the heating element.  If I stop it and restart the cycle it continues to fill up to the heating element at which point the float switch triggers and cuts it off.  I can hear it kick in and out before it finally stops as the water level bounces with all the splashing.  When I force it to fill to the heating element everything comes out sparkling and clean.  I took apart the inlet valve and cleaned it, although it wasn't really grungy at all.  The outlet pipe from the valve in to the dishwasher tub seems clear and unkinked.  Water isn't leaking out of the drain, or anywhere else for that matter and drains away when it is supposed to.

Questions:  I've read in many places that the water level should be to the heating element although confusingly I've also read that it shouldn't be that high.  Which is correct?  It seems that the timer cuts off the inlet water rather than the float switch and I've read that the latter is only really to prevent overflows if the timer sticks.  Is this so?  Does that mean that it's likely that the water pressure is too low and not enough water is getting in to the tub in the time allowed?  Any ideas on how to even guess if the pressure is adequate?  It seems fine at the faucets and showers. 

Thanks: For any suggestions or other wisdom - other than buy a new dishwasher, as I've already had that one rather forcefully stated and I'm not sure it's the right answer- yet.


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#2 sledge

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 06:47 PM

how old is it?

#3 Kipper

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 07:24 PM

01/96. Family of five, runs pretty much once, occasionaly twice, a day, every day.

#4 bigger hammer

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 08:32 PM

filmy residue can be a result of hard water. have you checked the if the rinse-aid needs to be refilled?

now if youre talking bits of food then a possible scenario could be plugged sprayarms or a partially blocked drain system. very common with these is the check valve. its a white nylon tube that connects the pump housing to the drain hose. make sure the dish washer is drained, get a towel, disconnect the drain hose and the check valve unscrews. make sure you dont lose the "o" ring. these are the perfect diameter for cherry pits, pistachio shells, olive pits, etcPosted Imagegg shells,

Before you start.....how much is it going to cost and how long is it going to take?

#5 Kipper

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Posted 08 April 2006 - 06:32 AM

Thanks for the tip.  I unscrewed the drain and it was clear.  Also, we are using the solid rinse aid in the little hanging basket.

I decided to try another approach to determine the problem and have more information but no real answers.  Having tesed the inlet valve to ensure that the solenoid was energizing and not chattering, I returned the valve to the dishwasher and connected the water supply.  I then connected plastic tubing to the valve outlet and, bypassing the dishwasher electrics, energized it.  I got a gallon in a bucket (which I'd cunningly calibrated earlier with a measuring jug and a marker - she'll never notice, and even if she does great science often demands sacrifices) in about 45 seconds.  The dishwasher timer runs the valve for about 90 seconds and years of advanced training tells me that I therefore get about 2 gallons of water for each cyle.  There I'm afraid blissful ignorance kicks in.  Is that enough water? Again, it only fills abouit halfway to the heating element with that amount.  I have a vague recollection of reading somewhere that 1.8 gallons was enough.  Maybe in a Samurai epistle? If so, that's enough water but goes against the conventional wisdom which says that the water level should be just at the heating element.  That requires another 65 -70 seconds of filling.  Is it too early to have a beer and put the dishes out in the rain to clean?


#6 nickfixit

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Posted 08 April 2006 - 10:11 AM

I would want it to fill enough to raise the float. Under the sreen inside the fill valve is a flow restriction washer(s),remove them and see how high it fills.

Nick

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#7 bigger hammer

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Posted 08 April 2006 - 11:03 AM

the water level up to the element or a hair under it, is a general rule . in 99.9% of the time its good enough. if you really want to know you will need to pull the schematic/tech sheet usually located in a pouch behind the kickplate.

it may tell you the amount of water the dishwasher should have in it after a fill cycle.

what it will definatelly tell you is how long the fill cycle should be. every D/W has different fill lengths but most  D/W's do it as a timed fill as opposed to sensor or float. some do fill until the float pops up but i dont think yours does.(i could be wrong but the schem will tell you)

my point is that the timer activates the water valve for a certain amount of time. wether the water is off or low pressure the D/W wont have a clue. so the schematic will tell you if its supposed to be a 90 sec fill or longer

Before you start.....how much is it going to cost and how long is it going to take?




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