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12 replies to this topic

#1 George

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Posted 05 April 2005 - 04:21 AM

I got from your site the Whirlpool Service Bulletine (which I greatly appreciate), saying that the active overlay might be "stuck or shorted" therefore the QuickRinse LED blinks once when we try to push any of the buttons. The advice is to measure resistance on the active overlay.

What are the reference values to know if the active overlay is faulty or I have to look for something else on the control board?

Thks for your help!:)


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#2 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 05 April 2005 - 06:42 AM

Start with the simple stuff:  Check the door latch switches and the thermal cutoff (TCO) on the main control board.  The TCO has been a common problem on these.  Ohm it out, if open, you'll need to replace it, including the wires the kit comes with.

#3 George

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Posted 06 April 2005 - 09:11 PM

Thks. I read your original advice, but previously I checked that all. 115V is present on the control board. Now the question is:

Control board or active overlay?

After what I read in the Service Memo it should be the latter.

Just how much resistance do I have to expect on the active overlay?

Which pins on the control board connectors should I consider? (The one that connects to the active overlay with the flat cable)

Thks again.


#4 George

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Posted 06 April 2005 - 09:14 PM

Sorry!

The TCO isn't that the one which is on the right side of the door, but not exactly on the control board yet?


#5 Moostafa

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 03:19 AM

[user=117]George[/user] wrote:

The TCO isn't that the one which is on the right side of the door, but not exactly on the control board yet?

Hello, my not-exactly friend.  In his last transmission from Heaven, our most dear and gracious host, Samurai Appliance Repair Man had provided a link to the part which clearly showed a photograph of the TCO.  You need only hover over the link with your mouse and twitch your index finger to view this stunning piece of appliance photography art.  The TCO is located in the same flimsy molded plastic frame as the control board but is not actually on the control board.  You would test it by performing a simple continuity test. 

Legend has it that sometimes these TCOs will test good on a continuity test, but will not actually pass live voltage to the control board.  Once again, the Holy Koran provides us with guidance, let us attend:

Reclining there upon soft couches, they shall feel neither the scorching heat nor the biting cold. Trees will spread their shade around them, and fruits will hang in clusters over them.  They shall be attended by boys graced with eternal youth, who to the beholders eyes will seem like sprinkled pearls. When you gave upon that scene, you will behold a kingdom blissful and glorious.

 Q 76:9-20

 

So, you see, the Holy Koran contains all wisdom and clearly requires that electrical components, such as ceramic thermal cutoffs, be tested using both a static test (continuity) and a live test (voltage). 

I trust this has enlightened you and that you now see the truth and wisdom of Islam. 

Allahu Akbar!


#6 George

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 04:12 AM

Sorry but I didn't want to offend anybody's feeling. I pointed out however, that I went through the door latch and TCO already and the board HAS the Voltage. What I was trying to figure out, how shall I proceed now:

1. Determine if the control board is at fault or rather the active overlay (more likely)

2. If the control board is defective, I could use a schema at least for the power supply part of it, which is definitely easy to repair

I was expecting help rather in this direction than in religions, those, which I greatly appreciate independently of their roots, Gods or particularities.

AA


#7 Moostafa

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 05:11 AM

Hello again, my religious friend.  I would not think that anyone was offended by your post.  And I trust you found my reply to your question about the location of the TCO both inspirational and uplifting. 

In rummaging through the website of our most dear and gracious host, Samurai Appliance Repair Man, I came across this war story of the Samurai's encounter with exactly  this problem.  I consider it a sacred work second only to the Holy Koran.  May it illumine you as it has the entire Muslim world.

Allahu Akbar!


#8 George

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Posted 11 April 2005 - 12:45 AM

Hello my Friend!

Yous war story was very interesting if not very short. I suspected the N-wire right at the the beginning... because I am - pls excuse my boasting attitude - the type of guy who analyses things and because this aspect of the N-wire was especially in the foreground working through a 240/120V transformer.

I also connected the DW to another 120V circuit, because I have got - just as is common in the USA, 2x120V single phase supply. To test BOTH supplies I connected some other equipment (solder iron) and it worked.

And as I pointed out, there was a time - right after installation and sometime later - when the SOB-DW was actually running. So the bug HAS TO BE within the DW.

Now I am waiting to be admitted to the great hall of kitchen to have a look at that active overlay (touch pad). Do you have any idea what resistance values to expect?

Do you have a schema of the control board? As far as I could see , it has a power supply part, that is easy to repair and the actual control part with IC's, which definitely is not.

Here in Budapest we also have good beer, however I prefer to consume it in the summer.

Best regards,

George

 


#9 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 11 April 2005 - 02:09 AM

[user=117]George[/user] wrote:

Yous war story was very interesting if not very short.  

For the record, that was my war story that Moostafa linked you to. 

The schematic for your d/w should be in a plastic pouch behind the kickplate panel.  If you're the only one who's ever worked on it and you haven't removed it, then it is there. 

The problem will come down to either the control board or the touch pad.  Can be tricky to distinguish.


#10 nygregor

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Posted 03 June 2005 - 06:19 PM

With all due respect to your wisdomness, I have not found anywhere you have answered the question about what EXACTLY to do if you find a problem on the the LED's.Can you give us additional guidance, o-wise one?Thanks and best regards,gregor from the east

#11 nygregor

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Posted 06 June 2005 - 05:56 PM

OK, so I think I've narrowed it doen to the active matrix problem. If I take the door apart to isolate the problem, what do I do with it after I find it?Any help is much appreciated. Dwasher is limping along at this point...Thanks,nygregor[user=1]Samurai Appliance Repair Man[/user] wrote:

[user=117]George[/user] wrote:

Yous war story was very interesting if not very short.  


For the record, that was my war story that Moostafa linked you to. 



The schematic for your d/w should be in a plastic pouch behind the kickplate panel.  If you're the only one who's ever worked on it and you haven't removed it, then it is there. 



The problem will come down to either the control board or the touch pad.  Can be tricky to distinguish.



#12 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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Posted 06 June 2005 - 06:52 PM

[user=1098]nygregor[/user] wrote:

OK, so I think I've narrowed it doen to the active matrix problem. If I take the door apart to isolate the problem, what do I do with it after I find it



Buy the touchpad and replace it! :dude:


#13 George

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Posted 06 June 2005 - 08:13 PM

:D

Hello!

In the meantime I ordered a control board, replaced it and now DW works again. As I said, the active matrix overlay measured ok.

Thks for your help. I found the documentation in the socket cover. Unfortunately it doesn't help much to debug the board itself, but I know this isn't done anymore in the field. Sitting on the other end of the world however it isn't quite simple to order a part and get delivered .

Best regards,

 

George

 





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