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Wire question -- aluminum and copper


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22 replies to this topic

#21 appliancehammerchewer

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Posted 26 May 2005 - 04:19 PM

Thanks for the link -- I read the article.

I think I am OK for moisture (with wire nuts, tape and it's under glass) which appears to set the galvanic corrosion in motion.

Just in case, I might splice in a bit of aluminum cored wire if I can find or buy a scrap -- the stuff I have lying around is all copper.  I will check at hardware store and an electrical place after the Mem day weekend.

The nice thing is this is it's a circuit that's not live very often (it's the hot surface indicator connection on a less frequently used elemnt so it's open almost all of the time) so it probably won't overheat from being on for long periods of time. It was the overheating I was concerned about.  I did a quick search on this and the CU/AL connection is a big no-no in domestic wiring contexts without special conectors.  In domestic wiring there have been some fires -- I knew I had heard about that somewhere.

Maybe another tech will give a sense of this. 

I will keep a close eye on it though.

Thanks again.

 

 

 


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#22 appliancehammerchewer

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Posted 19 June 2005 - 06:26 AM

One final note on this successful repair --

I thought about having two wirenut connections and went back in and replaced the two connections with one butt crimped connector and crimped on a new spade terminal.  I used some fresh 12 gauge wire (had to use copper).  Taped the butt crimp and called it a day.  I think I am good to go here.

I also thought about why the old part and the new part were different.  Here's my guess:  the old part (with a separate element and thermo-swithc) allowed for separate replacement.  So if your switch went bad, you could just replace this and vice-versa for the element. The new part has an integrated switch which means you have to replace both.  My problem of the wire harness being too short to make the new connections was probably an unintended consequence.

Thanks for your help.

I feel like I have completed an effective and safe repair -- that's the way it should be!

Arrigato and Siyonara.

Richard

 


#23 kdog

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Posted 19 June 2005 - 11:05 AM

note that the corrosion that occurs between dissimilar metals,although aided by,is not limited to moisture.  the structure of the outer shell of the atoms of the substance is such that there is a molecular transfer between the metals(theory of thermocouple operation); when current flows through wires,it creates heat which is also aiding to this process.  the best solution for you is to use either the copper(preferred option) or aluminum conductor for the circuit,but not both. so my choice would be to rewire both sides of the element back to it's origin. if connection must be made under the cooktop,i try to always use a good solder connection,topped with a couple layers of good quality,double wall heat shrink.      always try to route wiring away from hot surfaces under the top.
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