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Guest mytoybox9@aol.com

Sears washing machine will not rotate

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Can anyone tell me how to reair this problem and how hard it is to repair......Thanks

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[user=0]mytoybox9@aol.com[/user] wrote:

Can anyone tell me how to reair this problem and how hard it is to repair......Thanks
And the model # is....................

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If this is a Whirlpool/kenmore direct drive washer you have broken the coupler between the motor and the transmission, but cannot be sure without the model number, but since it does drain I imagine it is not belt driven because it will not drain with a broken belt.  the console has to be flipped, the whole case, top, front, sides have to be removed in one piece from the front, the pump and motor have to be pulled to get to the coupler between the motor and transmission.  This broke because the washer is overloaded or the transmission is hanging up.

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Here's my enlightening tome on replacing the drive coupler:

grasshopper_2.gifOne sure sign that the drive coupler is bad is if the washer will fill with water and pump out ok, but it just won't agitate or spin. Replacing the motor coupler is the most common repair task on this washer and is a pretty easy job, even for appliance repair virgins. How easy? About two mugs on the SUDS-0-meter. How can you tell if your washer is the direct-drive or belt-drive model? Like this.

We begin this repair odyssey by removing the washer's cabinet. The secret to removing the cabinet is revealed in this post. Read it now, go ahead, I'll wait...

Finished already? See, you're a whiz at this!

00003035.jpgOk, so with the machine stripped naked like a fatted calf in a butcher shop, we focus our keen Vulcan squinties on the pump, down in front, and remove the two clips holding it on to the motor. Then pull off the pump, unclip the wiring harness from the motor and the two wires from the capacitor (if present). Then remove the two motor clips (top and bottom) to remove the motor. Wallah! The motor, by the way, is double-shafted (for those of you in Palm Beach, "double-shafted" means it has two shafts). The coupler is the three-part piece you see between the motor and the transmission (the other side of the motor). Your old coupler probably looks something like this, or even worse. Here's what a new coupler looks like.

Incidentally, for an excellent and detailed interactive diagram of the guts of this washer, see this page. You'll be glad you did.

When you're all done and you have the guts all tucked back in place, replacing the cabinet is just as easy...if you know the trick. And remember to reconnect the lid switch harness or you'll be scratching your head wondering why the washer won't spin.

Ok, that's about all the rocket science involved with this little gig. All that's left for you to do is order the coupler, maybe even a genuine repair manual for more adventurous repairs in the future. And, of course, your love offerings to the United Samurai Beer Fund would be received most joyously.

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Wonder what he found wrong with this washer???   Coupler??  Gremlins???   Mouse ate the belt??  Oh wait, there is no belt...........

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