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Guest DonnaDoula

Kenmore Dryer Too Hot

48 posts in this topic

Hi Donna, The dryer element will glow orange, then the element will cut off when it reaches proper temperature, the come back on as the temp cools down.  It should repeat this as the heat cycles on and off and is drying the clothes.

As far as what wire should be placed where that is not something that I would comment on without being at that persons dryer.  Or, at the very least seeing the wiring diagram for that exact unit.  I just want you to know that we have not forgotten you here but I would feel better waiting for Budget Appliance Repair to comment further on this as that was his recommendation.  So please be patient and hopefully he (or some one else with more insight) will sign back onto the site soon and be able to help you further.

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

Sounds like you still have something grounded in the heating circut or the dryer vent to the outside is blocked.  If the case if hot either there is no air flow from the dryer or the element is not shutting off.  See if the element is cycling.  Take the vent hose off and insert a thermometer inside of the vent housing where the hose attached and turn the dryer on to high heat.  See what temperature the element is cycling off at, should be around 150* or so.  If it is going to 170, 180 there is something wrong, the element is not cycling off on the cycling thermostat, the one on the vent housing or the heat circuit is still grounded somewhere.

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Air is flowing freely to the outside, so I think the vent is not blocked.

When I open the dryer door, I can see an orange glow, from the heating element, but it goes off very quickly when the dryer shuts off as the door is opened.  Does this mean it's cycling?  or not necessarily?  [before I replaced the thermostat and thermofuse, the orange glow continued after the dryer door was opened and the dryer shut off.]  I think we're making s-l-o-w progress, but progress nevertheless!

Someone told me it could be a thermostat by the blower.   Does this sound right to you?  Does my dryer have 2 thermostats?  One by the heat element, and one by the blower?    If so, where is it? 

You said, "See if the element is cycling."  How do I do this?  Is this the procedure w/the thermometer?  I'm not sure I have a thermometer that measures this temperature of heat, but I'm sure I can get one if I need to.

What could the heat element be grounded to?  Are you still thinking of some foreign object possibly being inside the canister?  There's nothing in the canister except the heat element and a clip on the top holding it to the plenum, and a couple of wires connected to the bottom of the element. 

Man, I appreciate your help!  Thank you so much!  There is absolutely NO WAY I could do this on my own!

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if you let the dryer run through a cycle on its own,the timer should eventually count down and end the cycle,at this point,the clothes should not be hot,as there is a cooldown built into the cycle. otherwise,the grounding of the element may have caused sufficient heat in the timer contacts to weld them

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kdog:  I don't understand your reply.  You said, "if you let the dryer run through a cycle on its own,the timer should eventually count down and end the cycle,at this point,the clothes should not be hot,as there is a cooldown built into the cycle." 

This is what does not work.  I let the clothes cycle through and the last several minutes should be a cooldown cycle, but the dryer does not shut off the heating element during this last part, and so the clothes come out very hot, too hot...I'm afraid if I let this continue, it might be doing damage to my dryer. 

You also said, "otherwise,the grounding of the element may have caused sufficient heat in the timer contacts to weld them"  I REALLY don't understand what you are saying here. 

Did you know that I took out the element, examined it, easily bent apart the two sections that were touching.  They were not stuck or welded together, just touching.  As far as I know, I've done nothing with the timer contacts...do I need to check them?  What do they look like?  Where are they?  

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Your dryer timer has contacts that give power to the motor and the heat circuit for each different cycle.  Each cycle has a cool down period before the dryer stops.  Normal cycle has a 5 minute cool down and PP has a 10 minute cool down.  When the dryer timer is turned toward  the off postiion you normally hear 2 clicks before the dryer stops, the first click close to the off postion is the contacts opening to the heating element, the second click is the timer contacts opening to the motor.  With your dryer off turn your timer to a drying cycle then slowly turn this timer toward the off position, see if you hear 2 clicks before the off position or only one.  If you do not hear the 2 clicks the contacts to the heating element may be welded together, not opening the contact to the heating element for the cool down cycle.  If that has happened you would have to replace the timer or see if they can be seperated inside of the timer, but you would not want to try doing this since this could damage your timer if this is not the problem and may end up replacing something that is not broken.   You could also turn your dryer on to a heat cycle and let it heat up.  Slowly turn the timer toward the off position.  If you hear a click and the dryer keeps running this would be the click that should cut power to the heating element.  If the click is not there and the click that is there shuts the motor down, the timer may be damaged, the grounded element my have welded these heating element contacts together inside of the timer.  Grounded elements cause all sorts of other damage and this is all Kdog was referring to.  The element grounded may have caused other damage to other parts in your dryer.

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I hear two clicks. 

I tried both ways.  First with the dryer off, I turned the dial and heard one click when the dial got to the place where the cool down cycle is supposed to begin.  Then another click when the dial got to the off position. 

Then I tried with the dryer running.  Same thing...two clicks...one where cool down is supposed to start and the 2nd one when the dial got to the off position. 

 

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Good, when the dryer was running and heating and you got to the first click, does the heat shut off and stay off till the dryer shuts off at the second click?  You can test this by removing the vent hose from the dryer and when you hear the first click feel the air from the dryer exhaust to see if it cools down and stays cool, and not staying hot or getting hot again.  Also when you open the door the motor shuts off which kills power to the heating element now, not like when you had the grounded element.  If the cycling thermostat, which is on the vent housing your lint filter slides into was bad, it could cause your dryer to over heat, however it would be out of the system in cool down, the whole heat circuit is out of the system during cool down, unless something is still shorted or grounded.

 

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I removed both of the other thermostats and tested them with an Ohm meter.  They are both good.  Dryer still does not get cooler during the cool down period.  Any suggestions? 

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Hi - Just to maybe help you understand a bit more.  Remember on the old cars there were "points" contacts in the distributer that could get arced (welded) together?  Well there are many "points" inside a timer.  There is a plastic cam ( a wheel with high spots and low spots maded into it)  As the wheel (cam) is turning slowly by the timer motor these contacts are riding accross them.  As one high spot comes around it takes those two contacts and pushes them together.  As the timer motor is still making the timer cam turn very slowly other cams (low spot and high spots) come around causing different points or contacts to be able to come in "contact" with each other.  Each pair of contacts is controlled by that timers high spots and low spots on that cam and completes (makes or breaks) one opertation of each part of the dryer.  There is one set of contacts for the motor to start and stop.  There is another set of contacts in there for the heater to go on and off, etc and etc.  If the two contacts that should (by seperating by the cam turning, are welded or stuck togher, that may be why it is not cooling down. 

I hope I explained this so that you can understand what is going on inside that timer.

If you were to look at your timer and see all those wires that are plugged onto that one edge with that quick disconnct plug....each one of those wires plug onto one point (contact).  This is why some are above others.  So the cams high spots come around and make them make contact and then as the cam continues to turn it makes them seperate contact to that feature of the dryer.  But not if those two contacts got stuck together??  The trick is checking that.  With a meter AND the schematic and knowing how to use that meter and read a schematic you could remove the quick disconnect on the timer and test between the proper pins that the associated wires are suppose to be on when it calls for a cool down.  You should get an open reading with your meter when you are on the correct pins on the timer and have turned the timer to where the cool down would suppose to be.  Usually the last 5 minutes.  But if you do not have a meter or know how to use it, or know how to read the wire diagram  I'm not sure I would  recomend that you get into that.  Lets see what others say.

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Thank you for having mercy on me and explaining a difficult concept very well. 

Are all repairs this difficult, or am I just not getting it, or is my dryer's problem more involved than usual?  Ahhhhh!  I'm feeling so very frustrated.  (Thanks for listening.)

Now, I feel up to checking out my timer.  Can you please tell me where it is? 

 

Hi - Just to maybe help you understand a bit more.  Remember on the old cars there were "points" contacts in the distributer that could get arced (welded) together?  Well there are many "points" inside a timer.  There is a plastic cam ( a wheel with high spots and low spots maded into it)  As the wheel (cam) is turning slowly by the timer motor these contacts are riding accross them.  As one high spot comes around it takes those two contacts and pushes them together.  As the timer motor is still making the timer cam turn very slowly other cams (low spot and high spots) come around causing different points or contacts to be able to come in "contact" with each other.  Each pair of contacts is controlled by that timers high spots and low spots on that cam and completes (makes or breaks) one opertation of each part of the dryer.  There is one set of contacts for the motor to start and stop.  There is another set of contacts in there for the heater to go on and off, etc and etc.  If the two contacts that should (by seperating by the cam turning, are welded or stuck togher, that may be why it is not cooling down. 

I hope I explained this so that you can understand what is going on inside that timer.

If you were to look at your timer and see all those wires that are plugged onto that one edge with that quick disconnct plug....each one of those wires plug onto one point (contact).  This is why some are above others.  So the cams high spots come around and make them make contact and then as the cam continues to turn it makes them seperate contact to that feature of the dryer.  But not if those two contacts got stuck together??  The trick is checking that.  With a meter AND the schematic and knowing how to use that meter and read a schematic you could remove the quick disconnect on the timer and test between the proper pins that the associated wires are suppose to be on when it calls for a cool down.  You should get an open reading with your meter when you are on the correct pins on the timer and have turned the timer to where the cool down would suppose to be.  Usually the last 5 minutes.  But if you do not have a meter or know how to use it, or know how to read the wire diagram  I'm not sure I would  recomend that you get into that.  Lets see what others say.

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Well first make sure that you always unplug your appliance.

The timer is the large knob that you turn to set how many minutes you want it to dry.  Thats called the timer.

The knob is all that you see.  But behind the console is the actual timer with a shaft coming through the console that this knob screws onto.  The knob would have to come off unscrewed.  Then inside the console you will see the back side of that unit (the timer)  There is a quick disconnect wire harness that plugs onto it.  Look how it is so you put it back the same way with out getting frustrates.  There are usually 2  5/16 inch head screws holding the timer in place under the dial.  Again remember the posistion of the timer before you take it out cause it only goes back in one way. 

Then you need to read the schematic and have and know how to use a meter.

One simple thing just to try before taking it apart and out.  With the unit unpluged and the back of the console off so you see that back side of the timer.  Take the flate part of your fist and give it one hard tap.  If those contacts were slightly welded that may make them break a part.  Then plug in dryer and try dryer again.  Remember this is just still trying to see if that is your problem.  It could be but just a guess is something with that heater is grounded.  But not being there we are just guesiing.  At least I am :-)

I have got to get some sleep and will check in with you tomorrow.

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:D     :D     :D     :D     :D     :D     :D

IT'S WORKING!!!!! 

Per your instructions, I took the heating element and canister out again, and found the heating  element WAS touching the side of the canister, grounding it and making the dryer dry too hot. 

THANK YOU!  THANK YOU!  THANK YOU!

I'm telling everyone I know aobut this site!

 

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Gordon, did we not tell her NOT TO REUSE THAT ELEMENT????    Sigh......................

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YES we did. But you know how it goes.

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You wrote wonderful pages about this dryer and I did the best I could what with feeling like death warmed over with this cold/flu.....I really just feel like not trying anymore helping people...:?

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But you can't. As I said you are addicted to helping.

I told you I went through that about a year ago. (I had to turn it off) It took everything that I had to go through the withdraw and walk away for awhile. But I did it. Thats why now I only "dabble" a bit. I don't want to get hooked again. :D

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Pegi, Sorry to hear you've been sick with the flu.  Hope you're feeling better again real soon.

Thanks to both of you for all your tremendous help!

Just some clarification on the heating element.  It is not and was not ever broken.  My dad is an electrician.  He inspected it and said it was ok to use.  I took it in to an appliance repair place here in town and they inspected it, put it on the meter, and said it was fine to use. 

I'm a single mom who just lost my job.  I don't have an extra $40... ...which is why I'm fixing my dryer myself...to spend on a new heating element if this one will work safely for me.  HOWEVER, If I don't have $40 to spare, I also understand that I don't have the money, extra time, emotional energy, etc for a house fire!!!!!

The heating element was "sagging" a little and touching the housing/canister.  I removed it inspected the coils once again and re-installed it.  I've been using the dryer w/no problems, but have been inspecting it about every 10 minutes while it is running, just to make sure everything is safe. 

I thought there were some small miscommunications about the element when we were having our conversations via the computer.  As did one other writer who stated that they thought someone wasn't quite getting the exact idea of what I'd stated.  B/c of this, and my checking with two other professionals who could actually SEE the element, I decided to go with the advice they gave me. 

Pegi, you said, "I really just feel like not trying anymore helping people...:?"  I agree with Gordon, if you feel like not helping people, then don't.  You'd be better off not helping, than helping and then feeling terrible about it afterwards if people don't take your advice.  This is one thing that can make people physically ill...didn't you say you had the flu? 

Anyway, I hope you feel better soon and thanks again for all of your advice.  I did use about 99% of it and found it truly helpful!

I'm still going to tell everyone I know about this fantastic site!  Sorry you feel upset about it.

 

 

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Hi Donna – There is something which I would like to explain to you. And I suppose most people don’t know this and have thier own perception of what this site is about.

All of us here that answer questions do this on our own, spending our own time, only to help the do-it-yourselfers. No one gets paid. This is not any ones job. There are not 20 computers sitting in some large hall with technicians sitting there just waiting for a call to come in. Every one of the techs are either sitting at home getting on their home computer after they have completed their regular job repairing appliances or they are in their appliance shop, in their home town and trying to help people out, like you, on their own time.

When you ask a question some one, for absolutely nothing in return, is trying to help you.

If you are going to ask for the help then I feel that you should follow the suggestions that were given to by an expert as that is why you came to this site in the first place. But then to go off in your own direction before and instead of doing what was advised will get people that are trying to help you upset. I know that you must understand. If you ask for advice then do what that advice is. Or don’t ask. (That’s me anyway).

Also when we do repairs we DO NOT fix bad parts and put them back in. We use only new factory parts. That is how business is done and customers kept. That is how warranties are able to be given for one year on parts and on labor. So we (again at least myself) would not try to straighten out a bad part, or recommend it or advice any one to do it. Besides the problem of installing a used or bent or bad part could cause other problems in the machine. And worse case scenario a fire in some ones house.

So if one of the people here, and especially Pegi, says to do it this way, then that’s the instruction that you should listen to and follow. Again, as that is the reason you came here to begin with. You certainly don’t want a fire in your dryer because you are doing it your way and not an experts, do you? To go off on that timer issue yourself and to not replace the element is what I am speaking of.

Again, just my thoughts.

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Donna, I've watched Pegi and Gordon lead you thru this repair (no need for me reply,you're in very capable hands) and they are right,you should change that element. If it got weak and touched the canister once,it WILL likely do it again. Maybe with bad consequences for you,and we don't want that. We feel like we know you now and  want the best for you! I ASSURE YOU THAT IF IT WAS MINE I WOULD NOT RE-USE THAT ELEMENT IN MY DRYER. Didn't mean to shout but I really wanted to get my point across.

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[user=1091]DonnaDoula[/user] wrote:

Pegi, you said, "I really just feel like not trying anymore helping people...:?"  I agree with Gordon, if you feel like not helping people, then don't.  You'd be better off not helping, than helping and then feeling terrible about it afterwards if people don't take your advice.  This is one thing that can make people physically ill...didn't you say you had the flu? 

 

Donna, you have dishonored a Master Appliantologist.  This is not tolerated here at the Samurai School of Appliantology. 

You are hereby cast into the Outer Darkness until I hear from Pegi that you have appropriately and contritely apologized to her for your insolence. 

So mote it be.

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