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Is it worth $300


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5 replies to this topic

#1 DBHMEH

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 07:52 AM

Did not know where else to post this? Is a 6 year old Kenmore 25.4 cubic/ft side/side worth $300 if its in excellent shape.

Thanks

David

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#2 dgs

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 08:37 AM

Not sure how 2nd hand appliances are valued but this article by the Grand Master may be helpful in terms of what life you can expect from the appliance.

http://fixitnow.com/...long-should.htm

#3 Chat_in_FL

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Posted 21 September 2006 - 12:58 PM

[user=12926]DBHMEH[/user] wrote:

Did not know where else to post this? Is a 6 year old Kenmore 25.4 cubic/ft side/side worth $300 if its in excellent shape.

Thanks

David

Checked it out on ebay just for giggles. One year old SxS Kenmores are going for about $400

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#4 Ty2010

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 02:53 AM

RE: Life expectancy

I had, at slightly different times, a Maytag washer and dryer from the 30s, both ran like champs after very minor repairs. The washer had what appeared to be the same transmission in use into the 70s, wind-up mechanical timer and the belt went around all three pulleys on the bottom (which is all that needed replacing). The pump mounted like modern ones and was same shape except it was aluminum and the top was held on with a bracket and a set screw. The pump did need a new o-ring and a little lubrication. The belt I replaced with a Norge belt and drilled a new set of pump mount holes about 1/2" from the originals. The dryer was good to go with a few drops of oil in the motor and a new element string, same wind-up mechanical timer.

I didn't look into the antique value of these, sold em for something like 50 bucks each. Not all paleo-appliantologist experimentation has to have a reason other than morbid curiousity.

Later experiments revealed that a pump port can be fabricated with tin solder put down in a spiral with a 100w soldering iron and fused with a couple quick passes with a propane torch, but that's an entirely different story.

#5 Keinokuorma

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Posted 22 November 2006 - 10:09 AM

That reminds me of early 80's... we had an old Upo "automatic" washing machine with integrated separate spin dryer... (automatic because wash side had automatic direction changing and clockwork timer) from around 30's. The wash and spin tubs had separate motors and could be operated at the same time if needed...

It had to be filled by hose or bucket, drained by laying the drain hose down, clothes were to be manually moved to spin basket of course, but when it was new it was actually called automatic. My grandpa (from mother's side) had kept it in fine condition, and back then there were 5 people doing their laundry in it. Grandpa died in 1982, grandma kept the machine for a few more years... that year we moved to another house and got a Hoover front loader... that one served us for 12 years, never saw a repairman, and was sold forth because we moved into a flat with no room for the unit.

Later we've had a Philips top loaded drum machine 1994-1997, that had the first bearing job after a year, then a smaller Upo top loaded drum machine from 1997-2005 (grandma and aunt are still going with that) and now I've got a Zanussi pair of washer and a somewhat matching condenser dryer stacked... seem to work fine so far.

Funny how European Philips appliance production was bought by Whirlpool in the 1990's, many machines still were produced from the same crap parts under Whirlpool tags, in the same crap plants... there was a saying, "If it's Philips, don't let it out of the kitchen". It didn't help that we operated the machine in the kitchen... it broke in three years anyway. The old Upo lasted 50-some years, the Hoover 12 that we know of (would be in its 25th year) and the new Upo is going in the 10th year - no repairs that have become necessary on it yet! Haven't got much experience on the new European Whirlpool machines, but knowing that they come out of Philips plants, I'm somewhat skeptic.
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#6 Ty2010

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Posted 22 November 2006 - 04:21 PM

Hoovers (shudder), almost forgot about those. Didn't have any of those except for a single year, and that year had over 2 dozen. Not only Hoovers but similarly designed models with names I've never heard of, all of them pump drained though.




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