Jump to content


Use this Search Box to Find Appliance Repair Help Now
Need help finding your model number?
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!


FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Welcome to Appliantology.org, the Web's Premiere Appliance Repair Resource!

The world-famous Samurai Appliance Repair Forums


You can post a question and get repair help for FREE! Click here to get started.


Already a member of the Appliantology Academy? Just sign in with your username and password in the upper right-hand corner of the screen.

 


Photo

GE New Model Type 1


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 WhyMe

WhyMe

    Samanera

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 07 June 2005 - 01:39 PM

Hello,

I've had my GE model since 1999. It's never given me any problems. Recently, it started taking signficantly longer to dry clothes. The clothes feel slightly warm when they come out. Now, I generally use time dry, my wife uses the automatic dry. It's not drying for either mode.

So, originally, I pulled the dryer apart and I checked the vents and the internal ducts. The vent seemed to be fine, as far as I could check. My laundry room is an internal room and once the vent enters the wall, it elbows and goes straight up to the roof.

So, then I ripped the drum out and I ohmed out the 2 thermostats & the heating coil. I'm reading a short across each thermostat and a short across the heating coil. One of the two thermostats has a second set of wires (blue) and these read 9KOhms. In any case, nothing is open.

So I've elminated the vent (as best as I can), the internal duct seems okay, and all the electrical parts seem okay. Yet, it takes 2 to 3 cycles for the dryer to dry. Any suggestions?


Use the Appliantology Parts Search Box to Find What You Need!
Enter your model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

#2 ScottyUSN

ScottyUSN

    Unsui

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 08 June 2005 - 07:08 AM

I have the same problem. I am leaning toward dying heating element, but need to verify the temp sensors are not the cause first. Let me know what you do find, I will do the same.

Thanks Scott (sc1scotty@excite.com)


#3 Pegi

Pegi

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,120 posts
  • Flavorite Brew:Sweet Iced Tea

Posted 08 June 2005 - 09:51 AM

Pull the dryer out and take the vent hose off and run the dryer thru a cycle to see if it dries ok with this disconnected.  If it does it is the vent in the house.  What is wet and goes up sticks.  The worse thing you can do to a dryer is have a vent that goes up thru the roof.  If it still does this with the vent removed could be one of the heating elements has broken, if it has two coils, but with out MODEL NUMBERS we have no clue about what is in these units.
Buy your parts here! Posted ImagePosted ImageRead More

If we helped you kick some appliance bootay and saved you some coin, consider helping' us keep the lights on ==> http://beer.fixitnow.com

Are you a Master Appliantologist? ==> http://appliantology...ppliantologist/

#4 WhyMe

WhyMe

    Samanera

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 08 June 2005 - 10:28 AM

Oops, sorry. Model # is DBXR453EV0WW.

Also, I'm a bit embarrassed to admit this, but I didn't break the line when I measured continuity across the thermostats & the heating coils. I would have thought they were all in series, but it turns out they're in parallel. So, after work tonight, I need to remeasure.

Thanks for the advice on running the dryer without the vent hose Pegi. Isn't that going to throw a lot of lint into the air though? I have what's described ast 'Type 1' in the take apart guides, which means I DO have the back access panel. But it was kind of a pain getting the belt off the roller in the first place, because the access panel is so low, I couldn't look at what I was doing and had to do it blindly. I guess I could tip the whole thing onto it's side, which would give me better access for that.

Will let you all know what I discover when I get home.


#5 ScottyUSN

ScottyUSN

    Unsui

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 08 June 2005 - 10:50 AM

Pegi,

  I vented the dryer directly into the garage just after posting the problem (last dich effort prior to ripping the dryer apart) and the time to dry did decrease, so I will be off to find a vent brush after work!

 Easy indication it was a venting problem was: Air flow directly out of the dryer had alot more volume than at the roof of the house.

If I was going to remain in this house for a long period of time I would definately install a direct vent out the side of the house, but I will not be there much longer, and the exterior is brick. (just not worth messing with).

Thanks Again, Scott

 

 


#6 Pegi

Pegi

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,120 posts
  • Flavorite Brew:Sweet Iced Tea

Posted 08 June 2005 - 11:08 AM

You are welcome Scott.  Most dryer problems are caused by poor venting to the outside. Keep it  Short and straight  and horizontal.  Now we can hope WhyMe has the same luck. But of course, this will entail having to re-do the venting system or clearing this elbow/up thru the roof nightmare vent system quite often.  I would think a little lint blowing into the house would be worth seeing if the vent is the problem before burning up the dryer or it catching on fire???  And think of all of the electricity you are wasting by running this 2-3 times to dry a load???   Stick a leg of old panty hose over the vent to keep the lint out of the house while running this test.

Buy your parts here! Posted ImagePosted ImageRead More

If we helped you kick some appliance bootay and saved you some coin, consider helping' us keep the lights on ==> http://beer.fixitnow.com

Are you a Master Appliantologist? ==> http://appliantology...ppliantologist/

#7 WhyMe

WhyMe

    Samanera

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 08 June 2005 - 02:33 PM

Actually,  I'm happy to say, it's not the vent, it's the heating element. I can be such a dunce sometimes...

 

When I wasn't opening the circuit on the heating coils, each was reading a dead short across them (because they're in parallel with the thermostats). So I ohmed out each of the two coils with the connections open. Guess what, one's fine and one's open. So I start looking at the coil, and it's right there in front of me... the coil is literally broken in two. Would explain why I'm getting some heat, but not a lot.

Thanks for the advice guys. Any chance I can replace just the one coil, or do I need to replace the entire heating element (the whole plate thing) ?


#8 Pegi

Pegi

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,120 posts
  • Flavorite Brew:Sweet Iced Tea

Posted 08 June 2005 - 06:06 PM

You will have to replace both coils since they are attached at the common end.  You can buy the whole assy. in the canister or see of he has just the coil restring kit here and save lots of $$$$.  But still check you house vent for blockage as this could have caused the elements to fail..
Buy your parts here! Posted ImagePosted ImageRead More

If we helped you kick some appliance bootay and saved you some coin, consider helping' us keep the lights on ==> http://beer.fixitnow.com

Are you a Master Appliantologist? ==> http://appliantology...ppliantologist/

#9 Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Shōgun

  • Master Samurai Tech
  • 29,246 posts
  • Location: USA
  • Flavorite Brew:Sapporo Original Draft Rice Lager

Posted 08 June 2005 - 08:02 PM

I recommend the Ultimate Dryer Venting Guide:

http://fixitnow.com/...imate-dryer.htm


#10 WhyMe

WhyMe

    Samanera

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 09 June 2005 - 02:03 AM

Well, that may be my project this summer, but it's not going to be a fun one. My laundry room is an internal room on the 2nd floor. If I want to run a straight shot out the back, I suppose I could sneak a pipe into the crawl space along the side of my bonus room, but that means 1) I lose all that storage space & 2) I now have an eyesore of a dryer vent sticking out on the most prominent part of the house looking at it from the street.

It sounds like you guys are telling me to just move the dryer out of there and put it someplace where I can get a straight run to the back of the house.

So really, never, ever make a vertical run on a dryer vent, huh?

Anyway, thanks for all the great advice.



#11 WhyMe

WhyMe

    Samanera

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 09 June 2005 - 02:03 AM

Oops, duplicate post.

#12 WhyMe

WhyMe

    Samanera

  • Grasshoppah
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 09 June 2005 - 02:14 AM

Well, I just went and crawled into the crawl space with a flashlight (I need to get ready for work, so I didn't take the vent stack out & clean it, but I promise, when I get home with the new coil (or element) I will.

I may have a 3rd option. I thought the roof came right down to the floor to form the eaves in the crawlspace, but I actually have a 3 foot wall. So, question, which is better, making a bend and going about 2 feet on a run (which will also hide the vent better) or going 12 feet on a straight run to the front of the house (and proclaim my dryer vent as one of the most prominent features of the house :) ) ?


#13 Pegi

Pegi

    Sensei

  • Appliantology Fellow
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,120 posts
  • Flavorite Brew:Sweet Iced Tea

Posted 09 June 2005 - 06:18 AM

While not being able to see this as you are, a nice curved bend and a two foot run sounds better than the 12 foot with the decrative vent over looking the front of the house.. ;)  with a pretty fake flower arrangement hanging from it for a focal point...:cool:
Buy your parts here! Posted ImagePosted ImageRead More

If we helped you kick some appliance bootay and saved you some coin, consider helping' us keep the lights on ==> http://beer.fixitnow.com

Are you a Master Appliantologist? ==> http://appliantology...ppliantologist/




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


FAQs | Store | Memberships | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Beer Fund | Contact


Use the Appliantology Parts Finder to Get What You Need!
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.
365-day return policy on all parts purchased here, even electrical parts that have been installed!

Your Sometimes-Lucid Host:
Samurai Appliance Repair Man
"If I can't help you fix your appliance and make you 100% satisfied, I will come to your home and slice open my belly,
spilling my steaming entrails onto your floor."


The Appliance Guru | Master Samurai Tech

Real Time Analytics