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Daveb1972

Member Since 07 Feb 2012
Offline Last Active Jul 23 2014 08:40 AM

#278312 HVAC blows cool air in the morning but warm in the afternoon

Posted by Daveb1972 on 19 December 2013 - 12:39 PM

If the inducer fixed it then the pressure switch wasn't closing, and that keeps the igniter from lighting. This also means the gas valve should NOT have been opening. This could be a miss hearing problem, or a problem with the control. If the igniter isn't beeing activated the gas shouldn't be flowing even for ignition trial.


#261201 Tili TM11VR portable AC - not turning off

Posted by Daveb1972 on 15 July 2013 - 10:38 PM

The capacitors cause a slight delay I. The AC sine wave to the second winding, this phase delay results in a bigger applied voltage to the start windings giving the motor both direction and boost. If the cap is bad the motor would hum and get very hot before cutting out on hi temp. Relays are relatively easy to test, coil pulls in to close (or open) contacts, if contact is picured as 2lines with no slash, the. The contact is "open" until coil is energized, if the 2 lines are crossed by a slash, they are said to be NC normally closed, which is they are "closed" until the coil is energized. Most relays have a common connection between the NC and the NO contacts (Normally Closed/Normally Open) and it is usually marked C (Common). With the relay disconnected from power check for continuity between the C and the NC contacts (should have continuity/0 ohms) and from C to NO contacts (should have NO continuity, and read open on ohms or inf). If you energize the coil the readings should reverse. Not all relays have both, and even when they have both they are not always used. Some relays have many sets of contacts for the single coil. Check the schematic for details.


#250817 17 Year Old York R134a A/C + Heat Pump - Condensor Fan

Posted by Daveb1972 on 25 March 2013 - 03:12 PM

Most motors are universal mount, except for belly band. Match specs, rpm, speed, and frame size, voltage. Do not try to match capacitor size, replace capacitor to match new motor as labeled on the motor.


#250431 Expansion Tank Question

Posted by Daveb1972 on 19 March 2013 - 08:50 AM

Guys,

sorry to dispute, but if your municipality has meters, AND check valves, you MIGHT be ok, until they raise the water pressure, I've seen tanks with bulged tops 3-4 times, and found the T&P doesnt open in some of them. The manufacturers have started to refuse warentee unless you install an expansion tank and PRV. I still avoid it in most installs, but I have seen it first hand...have pics somewhere I'll try to find them....




#250430 Seasonal equipment advice

Posted by Daveb1972 on 19 March 2013 - 08:42 AM

This area (upstate NY) has a BIG problem with ethanol in fuel. The ethanol will separate from the gasoline as it ingests moisture and fall out of solution with the gasoline. The end result is low octane fuel, and a layer of water in the tank. Failure to deal with this will guarantee starting issues in the fall. There are 2 popular ways of dealing with this issue, first is to avoid fuel containing ethanol (very difficult to do) or add a stabilizer that has an enzyme that is supposed to maintain the miscibility of the ethanol in gasoline.

 

Gasoline that uses ethanol is made to a lower octane rating and the ethanol raises the octane level. When the ethanol absorbs water (which it loves to do, think dry gas) then goes through a significant temperature swing (seasonal changes) the ethanol/water blend falls to the bottom of the tank and is often the first thing picked up by the carb. The majority of old style stabilizers only dealt with the gasoline evaporative issues (“light ends” or the main volatile component of gas evaporates readily) leaving a varnish like substance. The “new fuels” don’t survive long enough for this problem to manifest.

 

The water that sits in the bottom of the tank can rot steel tanks, and will foul carbs when it sits in the fuel bowl.

 

My advice is:

Treat ALL seasonal fuels with  Star-Tron, or similar ethanol treatments.

 

Purchase only enough fuel for the season, and treat every batch

           (you never know when the last seasonal use is going to be)

           Treating all the fuel ensures the treated stuff is IN the whole fuel system.

               

Using a flashlight look into the fuel tanks and see if separation has occurred,

           If it has, dispose of the fuel, it isn’t useable. You can dispose of small (less than 2 gallons) in your car, if you

           have a mostly full tank.

 

Drain fuel bowls when possible, and use fuel shutoffs to empty fuel bowls (shut off fuel and run till stall)

            This can reduce the amount of muck that will deposit in the jet.

 

If you have contaminated fuel, and the machine won’t start, or seems under powered, remove the fuel, and replace

             with fresh treated fuel, including the fuel bowl. If that doesn’t fix it, you will need to have the carb serviced

             replacement needle and seat kits, are available, lets can often be cleaned, DO NOT ADJUST MIXTURES,

             they are set by the factory, and adjustment can violate emission laws.

 

Hope this helps with ethanol understanding, please look at the many online discussions of ethanol in gasoline for more tips to deal with it. Boat owners should be particularly wary of ethanol in fuel. The ethanol can destroy fiberglass tanks as well.

 

Thanks for your attention,

 

 

Chief Apprentice Appliantologist; Apliantology.org

Dave Bradshaw

ASE certified Mechanic

Nate Certified HVAC Tech




#248732 Rheem Classic 90 .. burners for 7 seconds then stops

Posted by Daveb1972 on 19 February 2013 - 06:10 AM

Haw was the flame sensor cleaned? You need to use an abrasive to do it right. Does the flame cut out instantly or fade (like fuel pressure dropping)? What is the light code explanation (on the furnace)? 1,5uA is generally the minimum to retain flame, so check for burners being clean (they are the other conductor) and that the flame is covering the sensor. If these don't improve it you are likely looking for a new board. The circuit that provides for flame sensing can fail leaving this issue as well. I've had the same problem before that resulted in a flame sensor cleaning even after I was told it was cleaned, you MUST use an abrasive to clean them, plumbers cloth works well, but and sandpaper should do the job.

Don't be afraid to post a video of the burner starting up, can sometimes be VERY helpful.


#247257 Armstrong SX 80 Blower Issue

Posted by Daveb1972 on 28 January 2013 - 02:05 PM

Short answer is the board needs to know when to start the timer. Different manufacturers accomplish this from 2 main methods, internal to the board, or external. The first think I'd do is check the furnace w/o thermostat connected. Connect the w and r terminals to see if the issue is furnace or control, next I'd look to see if there is a connection specified on the schematic for gas valve, and how many wires are scheduled to be there. Blower timers are sometimes set for 90 sec or more so check to see what the blower timer is set for, and time the burner run time from ignition to limit cut out. Also look for blower to start immediately when limit is tripped which is a common attribute for most controls. Ill try to download and review the schematic to see if I can find any more details that may be helpful.


#243848 nnordyne g6rc

Posted by Daveb1972 on 09 December 2012 - 05:45 PM

If you email me a number I can call you between calls to help you diagnose this the rest of the way. Use ddb28@nycap.rr.com subject line should be this forum name. I'm on call all this evening, or I can talk to u Monday afternoon.

You can also friend request on FB and I'm me.


#242741 No heat! Trane XE80.

Posted by Daveb1972 on 19 November 2012 - 10:02 AM

these sensors hardly ever need replaced. if the ceramic insulator is busted or the wire connection area is bad then yes, replace it. but if there is still steel forming the part in the flame, that can be cleaned, then it should be fine.

I concur, the sensors very rarely need to be changed. Physical damage is what often takes them out.


#242740 nnordyne g6rc

Posted by Daveb1972 on 19 November 2012 - 09:57 AM

Jumptrout is right, probably, just one other item to check....the flame rectification schemes are all polarity sensative, the L1 terminal on the main power MUST be 120vac hot, and the L2 MUST be neutral, and the chassis MUST be grounded. If after those checks you still have the same problem, then I'd replace the control. If you have trouble finding the correct OEM board, then check out the honeywell s92000 universal board, I use this frequently with good results.


#242537 GE electric range gives 1 free fireworks show, then retires...

Posted by Daveb1972 on 15 November 2012 - 09:54 AM

Please move this to the kitchen appliances forum. Thanks :thanks: :banghead:
.

Thats where it was submitted.

Volts are where expected, looks like the element will set this thing right, was ordered yesterday, so I expect the full recovery before the weekend!


#242354 Coleman DGAT070BDD Flashes once

Posted by Daveb1972 on 13 November 2012 - 11:10 AM

All furnaces that use flame rectification are sensitive to propper polarity. Chech the 110VAC supplu (black) to ground, and the same Neutral (white) to ground. If they are reversed this will occur.

flame sense values above 1.5 UA are usually enough to keep the control happy. I'd try to check burner ground as well, right where the flame would complete the circuit t ground from the flame sensor.


#232177 Heat pump not cooling like it use to

Posted by Daveb1972 on 10 May 2012 - 12:13 PM

Leaks are often just not worth fixing here in NY. with the average life expectancy of a condenser at 10-15 years, (the engineers tell us 10 years) your unit is already well within that range. I'd get a replacement quote first (2-3 of them in fact) and see if you can slip into something a little more efficient. That said, a propper repair can get you a few more good years.

BUT BEWARE, money inversted in this repair can be wasted if next year the comp goes, or another leak is found....etc. Also some companies will tell you they can change the condensing unit and reuse the evaporator, I'd be reall leery of that as well. The new systems are allmost all R410a which has much higher pressure durring operation, and the coils are matched to the condensor, so to get correct cooling and efficiency, they need to be correctly matched. The line set can sometimes be reused, if all of the connections are brazed (due to the higher pressures).

Some techs use "hard solder" or "Stay Brite 8" solder, which is supposed to be stronger than standard solder, but I prefer braze, make sure he purges with N2 and verifies fix with an actual vaccume (micron)guage (the manifold set gauge doesnt count!) I've seen vereren techs use the sound of the vaccume pump to determine if the system is propperly evacuated.Some times they will reccomend fixed metering instead of TXV, dont do it!

The pricing sounds about right for that type of repair, but I'd wanna be sure all of the leaks have been found. What did the Tech use to find the leak? was the evap checked as well? Chances are all of the joints in this system are soldered, and may exibit the same issue soon too.

When shopping for a quote, look for the major players; Carrier/Bryant, Lennox, Trane. I'd skip the Goodmans, Kenmore, Tappan, Kelvinator, etc....but thats my prefference.


#227097 Snyder SnyderGeneral (ArcoAire), GDE090A012AIN furnace, ignition annoyance

Posted by Daveb1972 on 16 March 2012 - 07:05 AM

Crossover tube alignment is crucial as well, try swapping the burners left to right, see if the problem follows the burners, or the position. If it follows the burners make sure the venturi is full open or close to full open, and that there arent any spiders living inside. Also check the flame when it is established. Is it the same on all burners? Does the flame "lift off" the surface of the burner, does it sound like a smooth hiss, or a rumbly flame blowing out type hiss? If the problem is position based, then check the orifices. The problem is not the gas valve (97% confidence) stepped gas valves and slow open gas valves either open, or not/ close or not. If they leak when closed, NG, if the dont open NG, other than that......NP.


#227095 Suburban #HF50B Circuit Board

Posted by Daveb1972 on 16 March 2012 - 06:54 AM

Honeywell makes a pretty good universal integrated furnace control, part number is S9200u, and is made to control HSI induced draft furnaces, and include blower control. If you send me a picture of the control, and all of the numbers visible on it, I can see if there is a direct crossover to this or another control. I have used this control in several applications. The existing control may have been the victim of water contamination causing the short, or often they will blow out a relay terminal. post detailed pictures, and I can help further. Include pics of the furnace and I'll see what I can do about better schematics. I would avoid "fixing" boards because of the nature of the electronics, and the need for the timing logic to operate correctly for safety. An example is if the unit fails again, but fails to open the gas valve circuit, the unit will run burner, without blower, and cause a fire, same if the control keeps gas on, if it fails to light, boom....I have seen modules do this, so NO MODIFICATIONS TO THE BOARD should be attempted. Not worth the risk. The universal boards often will satisfactorly replace a hard to find board, and if installed properly, they are safe, and the liability is then on the board manufacturer.





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