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beam current

Member Since 24 Feb 2013
Offline Last Active Today, 04:36 PM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Condenser fan motor and capacitor

Today, 02:17 PM

Hi Bratton, chances are you didn't hurt the motor or cap if you caught it right away. But you should change the fan blade now. When it came in contact with the motor housing, I'm sure it tweeked it. And you can't straighten them back to factory spec. Good news is they are fairly inexpensive. Make sure you order the correct rotation (CW or CCW), pitch (in degrees), blade # (3 or 4), and shaft bore size (most likely 1/2"). Your old fan blade may still have the sticker on it with the part number and above info on it. If not, take it to a local HVAC parts store and they can help you there.

When installing new fan blade, use BLUE Loctite and snug it down real good. And get proper distance on the shaft for the new blade. Use your old motor and set it to that on the new one.

As far as the motor and cap go, you can test them once everything is reassembled. With the power disconnect removed (no power to unit), there should be absolutely no slop or grinding (bearing issue) and very little resistance when manually turning the blade. Electrically the best way to check it is with a clamp-on ammeter. Check the manufacturer's sticker on the new motor. You are looking for the FLA (full load amps) rating. With motor running, check the black fan wire off the top of the contactor or the pcb. It should be less (maybe up to half an amp) than the FLA.

The cap can be checked with a DVOM with capacitance function. Remove power disconnect. Remove wires from cap with needle nose pliers. Short cap contacts for 5 seconds. Use an insulated handled screwdriver. Read across cap contacts. Check micro-farad uf rating printed on new cap. If outside the plus or minus percentage limit, change it. Be careful, caps hold a charge, even with power removed. It is crucial that you discharge the cap before handling and testing.

Parts can be found using the search box right here on appliantology.org with part name and/or part number. 365 day no hassle return policy, even electrical parts. We'd appreciate it.

In Topic: Corroded/loose lead on compressor capacitor - Panasonic window AC

13 July 2014 - 05:25 PM

Yes, that is correct. Capacitors (and the wires still connected to the cap connections) hold a charge even when unit is unplugged. Safety first and foremost.

In Topic: Corroded/loose lead on compressor capacitor - Panasonic window AC

13 July 2014 - 02:03 PM

Thanks Willie for covering my 6. I did guestion to myself Fred's second post about the terminal names he used compared to his first post, but didn't put it together. No excuses, just my not paying attention to the details.

With that being said Fred, please follow Willie's advice above. It's right on the money.

In Topic: Corroded/loose lead on compressor capacitor - Panasonic window AC

13 July 2014 - 04:10 AM

Thanks for posting the picture. It looks like you may be able to pry around the top of the cap to remove it. By the looks of it, it may be corroded in place and hard to remove. Did you try that? I have not worked on your specific model before, so I'm really not sure how to remove it.

You may be correct about the loose connection. However, other faults will cause this too. I would highly recommend taking amp draws and voltage readings on the compressor and fan. Also, visually test and/or inspect all other components and wiring. Compressors at initial start up pull a tremendous amount of current. A good quality true rms meter will show this. If you are not sure on how to check all of this, then call in a professional to get their opinion.

My major concern is obviously the fire hazard this presents. When that contact on the capacitor arced/burned, I'm sure some internal damage occured. It will most likely fail again soon.

I say replace the capacitor and thoroughly check out the unit to ensure it is functioning safely and properly. It's not worth risking life or property

In Topic: Corroded/loose lead on compressor capacitor - Panasonic window AC

10 July 2014 - 05:38 PM

Are you able to read the micro-farad and voltage rating on the capacitor? I would not advise you to "repair" by soldering to the fried contact.

I googled your model number and not much came up in way of a parts diagram. You stated that it is integrated into the compressor. Could you take a close up pic and post? Did you try pulling on the capacitor to seperate it?

Be careful, capacitors hold a charge and will shock you, even with unit uplugged from outlet. You need to discharge from common to compressor and common to fan BEFORE handling.

What are the ratings and then search for a like cap that you may be able to use if the manufacturer part is no longer available.


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