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wapitiscat88

Member Since 15 Jul 2013
Offline Last Active Jan 05 2015 10:59 AM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Samsung RF263 defrost sensor reposition

19 July 2013 - 10:16 AM

Yeah, I wasn't real confident about moving the sensor. In an earlier post, I was instructed to move it to the last rung of the evaporator. Is that the last horizontal rung before the vertical turn? I'll upgrade my meter prior to the next go round and see if I can get better diagnostics.


In Topic: Samsung RF263 defrost sensor reposition

19 July 2013 - 09:27 AM

What is this? Some sort of apprenticeship hazing ritual?  :wink:

 

Are you thinking it's a refrigerant issue? I'll try this the next time the refrigerator is nearer to empty. Mrs. Wapitiscat88 will have it filled after today's trip to the grocery. So the steps would be ... empty fridge, remove cover, melt ice/frost, replace cover, run for 2 hours, remove cover and document frost pattern. Sound about right?

 

Todd


In Topic: Samsung RF263 defrost sensor reposition

19 July 2013 - 08:48 AM

Tore into the fridge last night to expose the evap coil. You can see the ice on the coils in the picture. Ice was also around the fan and down into the channels in the Styrofoam "ducts". After melting/removing the ice, I tried to check the resistance of the sensor on the coil but couldn't get a reading. I also checked the sensor associated with the fan and got the same result. Either I am totally incompetent at using my multimeter or there's some trick to assessing these sensors (or both). The ambient temp was around 80 deg. F Are these sensors "open" at that temp? I would figure they would have a variable resistance that moved with the temp. Anyway, I hooked up the fan and its sensor, put the unit into forced defrost and the heating element did heat up. So, still some mystery here. I suppose the less elegant route would be to blindly swap out the sensor when/if I have to melt the evap coil again. I suppose with a little more digging I could find a main board diagram that gave me a better idea of witch plugs and pins to use for testing the sensor. Anyone have any other ideas?

 

Todd


In Topic: Samsung RF263 defrost sensor reposition

15 July 2013 - 08:56 PM

I got behind the unit tonight. Set the beast to manual refrigerator defrost and then crawled behind and opened the PCB panel. Checked voltage across CN70(white) and CN71(red) and got 120 VAC. Unplugged the unit and measured resistance across those same two pins and got 102 ohms. Tried to measure resistance of sensor but the CN's and the labeled wires were different from any diagram I had. Ending up trying to measure across CN30(purple) and CN76(gray) and got a goose egg. The probes on my multimeter are sort of blunt so I don't know if I was making good contact or not. Given that I'm not even sure that I was on the right pins I don't know if I can call this a sensor diagnostic or not. I figure I can check the sensor resistance from the "other end" when I open the evap coil cover and thaw it out. I thought that if I could diagnose anything as bad beforehand I'd wait and order the parts and have them on hand when I went in for the defrost. I'll have to coordinate with Mrs. Wapitiscat88 and see when I can open it up for the thaw out. Thanks for the help so far.

 

Todd


In Topic: Samsung RF263 defrost sensor reposition

15 July 2013 - 10:56 AM

 

 

 

If the heater and limiter are closed (or something low resistance, see the Fast track), then you should still do a manual defrost test from the muthaboard and check to see if the muthaboard is sending 120vac to the defrost components.  

 

 

So check for 120 VAC across CN70#5 and CN71#9 while in manual defrost mode. Amiright?



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