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GFCI and National Electric Code 2014

Just got done sitting through an 8 hour course on the NEC.  This course goes towards my continuing education hours needed to maintain my electrician certificate for appliance repair (07D Washington State Specialty Electrician).  Most of the class doesn't pertain to our trade, but I was able to pick up a few gems.  

The National Electric Code (NEC) is the code used by jurisdictions to determine if your electrical supply is up to code, which releases a new edition every 3 years.

Section 210.8 is where it talks about Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) requirements.  With the edition of NEC 2014, 210.8 (A) reads: All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specificed in 210.8(A)(1) through (10) shall have GFCI protection for personnel.

Newly added to the the NEC 2014: 208.10(A)(10) Laundry Areas.  That's right.  All laundry areas in new built or remodeled homes will include GFCI to all 120 volt receptacles.

Another new add on for the 2014 NEC:  210.8(D) Kitchen Dishwasher Branch Circuit.  GFCI protection shall be provided for outlets that supply dishwashers installed in dwelling unit locations.

One comment mentioned by the instructor at my class today.  "Every year that I teach the class, the NEC adds more locations that GFCIs are required."
 Which was followed by a comment from him.  The Code Panel is talking about adding GFCI to 240Volt outlets to the list of required circuit.  If this is so, the GFCI reset would  most likely be on the circuit breaker, because GFCI breakers are becoming more and more common.  

 

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Unbonded 240 VAC or Why You Should Not Let Cousin Eddy Install Your Dryer.

Customer called: Hey, got a dryer that is not starting.
Set the appointment for the next day.  

The second thing I found: the dryer cord hooked up wrong: (actual photo of said dryer had to be staged as I forgot to snap a photo of the terminal block. All 3 of the following terminal block photos are wrong and can/will cause this situation.)

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Having the cabinet grounded is similar to wearing a seat belt in a car or a helmet riding a bike.  It is only needed when it hits the fan. On my call, the fan got intimate with matter of the fecal variety. 

Before finding the cord hooked up wrong: I found the heater to be grounded, which heated non-stop, blowing the thermal fuse.

Part# 279838 and 3392519.  

Last but not least, the actual dryer which inspired this post :

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Its friend next door, the washer(Below):

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When the heater grounded out, the electricity had no ground path to follow.  It had to find a path, by arching to the washer cabinet, which was properly grounded.

 

Please, hire someone that knows what they are doing.  Or at least someone that knows how to follow the pretty little pictures:

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Dryer dry time and 240/120VAC

Today's customer was complaint: Dryer taking too long to dry.
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Here in the states, our homes are typically wired for 240/120VAC. Some are 208/120VAC systems but that is for another day/story.
The heater in this Samsung Dryer is 9.5 ohms.
Pictured above, the dryer was found hooked up incorrectly, with L1 and Neutral being hooked up backwards when the movers installed the new dryer cord. Which means the heater element was only getting 120 Volts rather than 240 Volts as it was designed.

 

What does this mean for our poor drying complain? The heater in this Samsung Dryer is 9.5 ohms. The heater was supplied with 120 VAC (incorrectly).
9.5 ohms @ 120VAC =1516 Watts.
Now if the dryer was hooked up correctly, blogentry-82846-0-04947400-1439502257_th the heater would be getting 240 VAC.
9.5 ohms @ 240VAC= 6063 Watts. Watts is power output or heat. 1516/6063=.25 or 25% of normal output wattage.....

 

Dryer taking too long to dry. Her quote when describing the problem: "I have to run the dryer about 4 times to get a fully dry load."

 

The best part about this story, the manufacture color codes the wires from the dryer to match the dryer cords. Just in case there is any confusion, they have also attached a pretty picture. blogentry-82846-0-38007600-1439502270_th

 

Bonus Question: What would have happen if you hooked up the cord incorrectly with L2 and N switched?
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Part deception

Recently, I needed to put two infinite burner switches in a Frigidaire slide in range. These switches were for the two large burners. Installed them, and did the simple but basic tests. Both burners now working, customer is happy, :blinky: , I'm happy. I collect my beer :pint1: money for the day and off to other adventures.

Customer calls back next day and not so happy. One burner doesn't get hot enough to hardly boil water. Okay I said, see you later today? Yes. Get out to location and here is what I discovered.... see the pictures below.

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Did you see it? I almost didn't. Of course the story above is highly plausable but totally fake, because, I saw it before installation of said part. Moral is, always inspect your parts before installing them. One of the switches must have fallen off the assembly line and been packaged with the wrong part number... At the Factory!! Say it aint so, a manufacture making a part mistake?!!? :woot::woot: