Tired of guessing on service calls?

Click here to check out our structured, online appliance repair training courses for rookies and experienced techs.

FAQs | Repair Videos | Academy | Newsletter | Podcast | Contact

Stay connected with us...

Samurai on Facebook - become a fan today! Sign up for our free newsletter and keep up with all things Appliantology. Subscribe to our YouTube channel for lots of appliance repair tips and help! Follow the Samurai on Twitter and get timely morsels of Appliantological Wisdom! Subscribe to our MST Radio podcast to learn secrets of the trade.
  • Announcements

    • Samurai Appliance Repair Man

      [Webinar] Electric Circuit Troubleshooting and EEPs   12/05/2016

      I have a special topic for tonight's Office Hours webinar on electric circuit troubleshooting and EEPs. If you've taken the Fundamentals course or watched any of my Youtube videos, you know that EEPs are a topic near and dear to my heart. EEPs = Electrically Equivalent Points. Identifying EEPs on a schematic is a key skill for any appliance tech today.  Another special feature about this Office Hours: in addition to the usual Academy students and Professional Appliantologist members, Senior Appliantology Fellows and Legacy Techs at Appliantology are also welcome to join us for this Office Hours. Just click into the topic below to RSVP and to get the connection info.   

Samurai Appliance Repair Man's Blog

  • entries
    799
  • comments
    943
  • views
    2,396,872

Some service call tips for Professional Appliantologists to avoid call-backs, insurance claims, and lawsuits (and keep happy customers)

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

820 views

Leaving the appliance (and your work area) *cleaner* than it was before you arrived---is another win-win with the customer.

Quadruple check the refrigerator / dishwasher / washer water hoses---and at both ends. Even if you haven't touched them. Chances are someone else (before you arrived) has---and left the hose(s) only finger-tight.

A little movement of the appliance---and the hose begins to leak after a few cycles (or use of the appliance).

The sudden pressure build-up in a hose---when the valve closes---can spring a drip-drip-drip type leak.

Gas pipe connections---tighten 'em---leak test 'em. Check again. Replace the gas pipe when in doubt of it's overall condition.

Floors---wood or congoleum---notify the customer of any/all blemishes---the moment that you enter the kitchen or laundry room.

Most customers (in my area at least) are appreciative of a technician that demonstrates immediate *situational awareness*.

Not some guy plodding through their home in a "Mental Holiday" state-of-mind.

Lastly---if you *do* goof/screw-up---own up to it.

People are amazed when someone takes responsibility for their errors---they'll also likely continue to use your services---even if an insurance claim was required. Been there,done that.

Source: "Duh" repair follow ups and how to avoid them