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Wall Oven Wiring Fail

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

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I went to remove a wall oven today and ran into a little problem. Can you find it?

gallery_4_85_1107444.png

I run into this kind of problem all the time up here in the backwoods of New Hampster. It's an endemic problem with electricians and handymen not bothering to read the installation instructions. For the record, this installation fail was done by a licensed electrician. Kind of a wake up call for the whole licensing racket, isn't it? Having a "licensed" electrician is still no guarantee that he knows what in the hell he is doing or is capable of reading simple installation instructions.

In case you're interested, you can read the manufacturer's installation instructions yourself here: http://manuals.frigidaire.com/prodinfo_pdf/Lassomption/318206002.pdf

BTW, those specs are typical for all manufacturers.

Bottom Line with any wall oven installation: You need to have enough slack in the power wire conduit to be able to remove the wall oven from its compartment.

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How then, Sensei, did the Sparky wire the thing up and replace the junction box cover???

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Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Posted

Elementary, my dear skindigit.  Sparky wired the wall oven first, with it outside the cabinet.  He then pushed the length of wire and cable conduit down the hole into the basement where the junction box is (instead of the proper location inside the cabinet cubby with the oven, as shown in the installation instructions).  Then Sparky pushed the wall oven into place, went down into the basement and pulled remaining slack out of the conduit.  

 

Sparky never considered the prospect of the wall oven having to pulled out for service (hidden bake element on this one, wall oven has to come completely out to replace it) and apparently thought this wall oven would last forever and never need to be replaced.  

 

Sparky's story is, unfortunately for the customer, a common one.  

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richseattle56

Posted

And again, it is no wonder they call you Samurai!!!!! Sparky didn't have a chance.

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Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Posted

Sparky called me yesterday and, to his credit, he's going back out this Friday to amend the error of his ways.  I'll go in after to do the repair: replace the bake element (hidden element, replaced from the bottom, entire wall oven has to be pulled).  

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Could be worse. You could go out on a wall oven Hammer the Genuis Carpenter pinned into the wall, unable to service with damaging solid red oak trim. The home owner needed a thrice explanation about why I couldn't repair her oven. Made me wonder about both of them.

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Samurai,

 

What wise device do you use for a stand for wall ovens.

 

Domo

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Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Posted

I use the venerable All Dolly.  

 

And my teenage son.  

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Interesting, my first guess would have been new install style with the junction box attached to the cabinet back immediately below the drawer bottom.

Pulling the fridge and end panel from the cabinet not an option even though it's a non visible area? On that note, you wouldn't believe what's been volunteered as a sacrifice to get an oven fixed the day before Christmas or Thanksgiving.

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Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Posted

 

Pulling the fridge and end panel from the cabinet not an option even though it's a non visible area? 

 

 

Nyet, tovarish.  Home boy ain't about to jump around his elbow to get to his azzhole because the electrican did a non-spec installation.  

 

So I do it this time.  What about the next time this wall oven needs service?  Same Chinese fire drill?  

 

That ain't the answer.  

 

The solution is to get the installation up to the specifications that is should have been installed with in the first place.  Then the unit can be serviced both now and in the future.  

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