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  • Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Annual Service Training Institute 2017 in San Diego

    By Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Had a great week at the Annual Service Training Institute (ASTI) in San Diego last week! Got to hang out with old friends as well as meet lots of Appliantologists and Master Samurai Tech students in-person for the first time. For technical training, I focused mostly on high-end appliances since that's about all that's worth fixing these days. Attended some technical training on Sub-Zero, Wolf, Bertazzoni, DCS, and a couple others, and some business courses.  I also conducted an all-day live training session on troubleshooting using the MST Ten-Step Tango Troubleshooting Procedure. It was an AM and PM session with the PM session a repeat of the AM session. I was surprised by how difficult it was to do! You're standing in front of a crowd of people all day, working through troubleshooting problems, answering questions, talking at volume (large room) all day long. I was pretty wrung out by the end of the day. I have a lot of new-found respect for manufacturer trainers who do this day in and day out as their job. That's a tough way to make a living!  It was pretty sweet the way I did it though, if I do say so myself. I set up my own wifi network in the room and did the whole training session from my iPad that projected on the screen via my Apple TV. That way, I could zoom in and draw on schematics, just like on the troubleshooting workshop webinars we've been doing here at Appliantology. If you've been to any of the recent webinars, the live training class I did at ASTI was a longer version of those workshops. Professional Appliantologists can watch those webinar recordings here.  Here's a short clip of me teaching the troubleshooting class at ASTI. You'll notice some of the guys are looking at their devices. That's because I gave them a link to the schematics I was going over so they could download them and look at them in more detail. Wanna see for yourself? Just go to GetMST.com.  I made an album of photos from the ASTI last week that you can check out here:  If you were at the ASTI and have some photos you'd like to share, please do! You can post 'em here as a comment or start your own photo album in the Gallery.     
    • 3 comments
    • 139 views
  • Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Appliantology is Your Key to Appliance Repair Service Call Success!

    By Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    The Old Skool method of doing service calls was to go out on the call and pray to the pot bellied Buddha that the tech sheet was still hidden somewhere on the appliance. The plan being that, if the tech sheet was still there, you could stare at the lines and squiggles long enough to convince the customer you had reached a definitive and scientific conclusion about the problem.  My friends, I'm here to tell you that the Internet has made this Monkey Boy way of doing bidness obso-frikkin-lete! With powerful information tools, like Appliantology, at your fingertips, there's no need to rely on the pot bellied Buddha leaving the tech sheet for you. This webinar will teach you a whole new way of doing bidness using Appliantology as your trusty information tool, every bit as valuable as your Bosch driver or Princeton Tec headlamp, to increase your First Call Completes and profitability. To learn more about all the splendiferous benefits of being a Professional Appliantologist member here at Appliantology, CLICK HERE!  Learn more about Appliantology and it's powerful benefits to you as a professional appliance tech in our free and fun short course, Appliantology 101: Your Guide to the Ultimate Appliance Repair Information Tool.     
    • 1 comment
    • 1,365 views
  • Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    The Master Samurai Tech Ten-Step Tango for Troubleshooting Appliances

    By Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Troubleshooting is the big missing skill among appliance techs today. This is the skill that distinguishes parts changing monkeys (PCMs) from Master Samurai Techs. It's the difference between a drunken street brawler making monkey jabs versus a trained MMA fighter making kill shots. PCMs will thrash about wildly, monkey-jabbing at components hoping to get lucky and usually end up getting their asses kicked. Anyone can monkey jab and the sad truth is that this is the dominant practice of the appliance repair trade today. It doesn't have to be that way. Anyone who wants to can learn how to make kill strikes like a Master Samurai Tech.  Master Samurai Techs don't rely on luck. They have a plan of attack, a strategy. They deploy precision kill strikes that have been honed in the Dojo-- training at the Master Samurai Tech Academy and in the Office Hours webinars-- and systematically dominate the appliance.  Whether you're troubleshooting a simple GE dryer with just a mechanical timer or a Sub-Zero refrigerator with a microcomputer board, multiple sub boards and two different compressor technologies, the troubleshooting procedure is the same. That's the Ten-Step Tango: a structured, disciplined procedure for solving problems.  In our Office Hours webinars, we've begun a series of workshops on the Ten-Step Tango, applying it to different troubleshooting scenarios on real-world appliances. We started off by introducing the Ten-Step Tango procedure and then applied it to simple appliances (no control boards, just mechanical controls, like timers). Then, in the next workshop, we kicked it up a notch and troubleshot appliances with multiple control boards, digital communications, hoodoo, voodoo, and all kinda weird stuff.  The workshop webinar recordings, along with all the other Office Hours webinar recordings, are available for Professional Appliantologists and Master Samurai Tech Academy students to watch at the links below: Master Samurai Tech Academy Students: http://mastersamuraitech.com/webinar-recordings/ Mr. Appliance® Academy Bundle 1 Students: http://mrappliance.mastersamuraitech.com/appliance-repair-course-support/student-forums/forum/webinar-recordings/ Professional Appliantologists: https://appliantology.org/topic/58003-webinar-recordings-index-page/ The next workshop will be in January 2017 and will be announced here at Appliantology as well as in the MST-Appliantology newsletter.    
    • 4 comments
    • 503 views
  • Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Understanding "Loading Down" in DC Power Supplies

    By Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    If you've spent any time at the tech-only forums here at Appliantology, you've probably heard me refer to "loading down" as a failure mode that we encounter today in the field as appliance techs. Most techs are unaware of this as a failure mode and so end up replacing a control board when the problem was a bad DC load all along. This is part of the brave new digital world we live and work in today! This little video gives a very simplistic explanation of what loading down is, how it manifests, and how to troubleshoot for it. Hope it helps!   
    • 5 comments
    • 524 views
  • Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    The Future of Appliance Repair: a Profession or an "Idiocracy"?

    By Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    We have a lot of moving parts at play in the appliance repair industry today. Over the past couple of decades, appliance technology has become much more complicated, yet technician troubleshooting skills have eroded. This creates some uncertainty about the direction our industry is going.  Are we going to be a profession, filled with well-paid, highly-skilled technicians at the top of their game, or a semi-skilled trade, filled with low-paid parts changers who are essentially just the eyes and hands carrying out the directions of tech-line personnel? Will both of these types of techs coexist, or will one go extinct? We’ve worked with thousands of techs and scores of business owners online over the years, most of whom take training and their profession seriously. We meet lots of folks like that at events such as ASTI. It makes us feel that the transition from trade to profession is here, and here to stay.  A big wake-up call for the Samurai Recently, however, I had an abrupt reminder that there are still many who are not on board with that vision and are also influencing the direction of our industry.  I was doing ride-alongs with techs at a large service company to assess the effectiveness of our online training at The Master Samurai Tech Academy. I was surprised and dismayed to see that the techs weren’t using many of the techniques that we emphasize in our training, such as coming to a job prepared with tech documents, doing a simple load analysis using the schematic, and performing electrical measurements from easy-access locations to definitively identify the component failure. In fact, they seemed to have forgotten even how to do many of these things.  What the heck? Where did I go wrong? It all became clear to me when I had a chance to go over the day’s calls with a service manager for the company. When I described the troubleshooting methods we used on a dryer call, he declared that we had gone "full retard" (a phrase from the movie Tropic Thunder) for actually looking at the schematic, doing a few amp readings and one simple Ohm’s Law calculation. I was speechless. This is the guy who is supervising the techs who were paid to go through Master Samurai Tech training. However, it explained what I had seen that day. Although one of the senior managers at this company saw the value of using the MST Academy training for their techs, the other managers were not on board. Many of the skills taught at the Academy were not just ignored or discouraged, they were outright ridiculed. So of course the techs basically became parts-changers who simply carried out instructions from their manager or tech line. At that point, another movie came to mind, Idiocracy, which imagines the dismal result of several hundred years of cultural anti-intellectualism. I’m used to encountering techs who are a bit defensive about their lack of troubleshooting skills, but when even service managers mistake pattern recognition, parts changing, and a collection of factoids for real troubleshooting or, worse yet, have become hostile to it, then idiocracy is gaining a foothold in the appliance repair trade. Attitudes: the good, the bad, and the ugly Over the past decades, the technical skill level among many appliance techs has degenerated to such a low level that they don't even know what cause-and-effect troubleshooting is anymore. Since service managers are now being promoted from this group of techs, this attitude has become firmly entrenched in some organizations. In all my dealings with techs over the past 20 years, I have come to realize how phenomenally important attitude is. And I’ve seen it all. Some techs love to keep learning and sharpening their skills, no matter how many years they’ve been doing it, and enjoy the pride of accomplishment and the profits that come along with it. Then there are others who have worked long enough to have some know-how based purely on pattern recognition (“if this problem on that model change this part”) and resist the notion that their job performance and income would benefit even further if they learned real troubleshooting skills. The causes of this attitude include ignorance, arrogance, and laziness. Ignorance is curable through outreach and training. Arrogance and laziness are difficult and dangerous qualities in a tech, but even worse in someone who is in a leadership role. What's the risk to the industry if too many techs go down the road of idiocracy? Doesn’t that just give an opening for more success by those companies that behave like professionals? Not necessarily. The expression "a rising tide lifts all boats" works in the opposite direction as well. The experiences our customers have with “parts changers” can negatively impact their future interactions with other service companies. They will often be more suspicious and price sensitive. Furthermore, appliance manufacturers are seeing this problem in the appliance repair industry today, too. They realize there is uneven, often inadequate technical expertise in the trade. As a result, they are adapting to this general dumbing down in troubleshooting skills by dumbing down their training programs to essentially spoonfeeding what's already in the service manuals, knowing that most techs don't RTFM. They're also developing new technologies to decrease reliance on field techs to troubleshoot and solve problems.  Here's what the future could hold:
    - Wifi-enabled appliances will report errors and diagnostics directly to the manufacturer's central technical staff who are specialists in that product. 
    - Corporate techs can then run diagnostics and do most troubleshooting remotely. 
    - The service company is then dispatched to simply replace a part- no troubleshooting required.  If this comes to fruition, the end result will be a decrease in skill level expectation from technicians. And since higher pay accompanies and incentivizes the acquisition of specialized skills, there will be a concomitant reduction in "technician" pay and skill level. Service managers will be be reduced to route makers and time card checkers with a corresponding reduction in their skill level expectation and pay.  All is not lost on this front. I speak with enough manufacturers to know that they would still like a better trained corps of appliance techs out there who can keep our mutual customers more satisfied. They haven’t given up on us yet! Take a look at yourself! Have you looked at yourself?  I’m sure most of you reading this don’t come anywhere near being the kind of person who would call technical troubleshooting going "full retard." But, we would all benefit by stepping back and taking an honest look at our attitudes and expectations to see what part we are playing in raising our trade to a profession, and identify (and remedy) any weak links in our organizations. After all, if you’ve invested in training the techs in your company, it’s a waste of money if you aren’t implementing and nurturing the skills and practices that the techs learned in that training. Here’s what I still see too often when I go on ride-alongs with techs. Do you recognize any of these traits in your own service calls? 1. The tech arrives at the service call with no technical literature (service manual, tech sheet, bulletins) pre-loaded on his tablet or notebook computer. A manager may have pre-screened the calls and had probable parts pre-loaded on the service tech's vehicle, but the tech himself/herself is walking into the call completely cold. 2. If the call is anything other than a simple mechanical problem or parts replacement, the tech calls either his service manager or the manufacturer tech line.  3. Either way, the tech is spoon fed information to complete the diagnosis or repair; he is merely following detailed instructions but not doing the troubleshooting himself. From the tech's standpoint, this is only adding to his internal database of pattern recognition and factoids. 4. Neither the service manager nor the tech line guy has the time, patience, or skill to use this experience as a teaching moment and coach the tech through a troubleshooting thought process by asking leading questions. Examples:
        - what is your load of interest on the schematic?
        - what other components have you identified in the circuit for that load?
        - where does the schematic indicate that you would test the power supply for that load? 5. The appliance may get repaired as a result of the spoon feeding but the tech never grows in his ability to perform independent troubleshooting analysis-- he has simply added another pattern to his repertoire for recall on another job with the same problem. Reliance on outside counsel such as service manager and manufacturer tech line, which should be a rare event for a skilled tech, is perpetuated. Job security for the service manager and tech line guy is assured, but no skill growth for the service tech takes place.  The foregoing is a typical pattern of degraded tech performance that is accepted as the "new normal" by far too many service companies. The problem is compounded when the service company middle management-- the service managers-- not only accept this degraded performance, but defend it.  Pattern recognition and a head full of factoids do have their place in appliance repair. In fact, these form the basis of experience in older technicians, allowing for quick diagnosis and repair of commonly-occurring problems with known solutions. But these experiential skills should not be mistaken as classical troubleshooting and are insufficient for service calls with problems that don't fit the pattern or are "off the flow chart."  The rewards of professionalism Techs who take the time to hone their craft with training, continuing education, and pre-diagnostic work are true professionals. Being prepared and able to competently troubleshoot any type of appliance and failure scenario is where the big payoffs happen in terms of reputation and profit. First Call Completes are maximized, callbacks are minimized, and cheerleader customers are forged. That’s what a professional business looks like. Is it too late to turn back the tide of idiocracy in the appliance repair trade? We at Master Samurai Tech firmly believe it is not too late and we have developed affordable, time-flexible training solutions to aid our brethren in the Craft. These skills are eminently learnable by anyone who desires to do so, and we’ve seen countless examples of techs and owners who have reaped the rewards of rising to the challenge. Join us, and help avert the future portrayed here: In a recent webinar, I offered a mental framework for executing classical troubleshooting strategies during service calls. Professional Appliantologist members and Master Samurai Tech Academy students may watch the 1-hour webinar recording here:  
    • 29 comments
    • 1,504 views

Our community blogs

  1. Had a great week at the Annual Service Training Institute (ASTI) in San Diego last week! Got to hang out with old friends as well as meet lots of Appliantologists and Master Samurai Tech students in-person for the first time.

    For technical training, I focused mostly on high-end appliances since that's about all that's worth fixing these days. Attended some technical training on Sub-Zero, Wolf, Bertazzoni, DCS, and a couple others, and some business courses. 

    I also conducted an all-day live training session on troubleshooting using the MST Ten-Step Tango Troubleshooting Procedure. It was an AM and PM session with the PM session a repeat of the AM session. I was surprised by how difficult it was to do! You're standing in front of a crowd of people all day, working through troubleshooting problems, answering questions, talking at volume (large room) all day long. I was pretty wrung out by the end of the day. I have a lot of new-found respect for manufacturer trainers who do this day in and day out as their job. That's a tough way to make a living! 

    It was pretty sweet the way I did it though, if I do say so myself. I set up my own wifi network in the room and did the whole training session from my iPad that projected on the screen via my Apple TV. That way, I could zoom in and draw on schematics, just like on the troubleshooting workshop webinars we've been doing here at Appliantology. If you've been to any of the recent webinars, the live training class I did at ASTI was a longer version of those workshops. Professional Appliantologists can watch those webinar recordings here

    Here's a short clip of me teaching the troubleshooting class at ASTI. You'll notice some of the guys are looking at their devices. That's because I gave them a link to the schematics I was going over so they could download them and look at them in more detail. Wanna see for yourself? Just go to GetMST.com

    I made an album of photos from the ASTI last week that you can check out here: 

    If you were at the ASTI and have some photos you'd like to share, please do! You can post 'em here as a comment or start your own photo album in the Gallery

     

     

  2. I had a Samsung fdbm refrigerator where the week before christmas I got a no cool complaint. Checking the part, it had to be shipped in. It arrived that Friday, and of course it was the wrong evap cover. I devised a plan, but thankfully didn't have to use it. In the end I was able to swap the fan motors and use the existing evap cover but just for fun I garaged a proof of concept using a simple voltage divider circuit. 

    What it does is take the I put to the fan, and divides it into a lower voltage to tap into and feed back. The output voltage is dependent on the input voltage. It took a bit of playing with to get it right, but it would have worked. 

    This was the only time I've seen this happen btw. 

     

  3. We've seen a ton of Dacor built-in ovens fall victim to F1 and F7 error codes.  The F1 can be caused by a number of different things: failed control boards, high resistance connections to the temperature sensors, and failed touchpads.  F7 is only the result of failed touchpad.  But, failed touchpads don't always yield error codes - other symptoms include erratic behavior ("ghost in the oven") and/or non-responsiveness.

    Unfortunately, OEM touchpads are no longer available, and the ones available through 3rd party resellers are at risk of being faulty.  So when the touchpad fails, it looks the only option a homeowner has it replace their oven...their nice, built-in Dacor oven that cost them a hunk of change and perfectly fits in with their kitchen already.  This does not make for happy campers.

    But not anymore!  The BoardFruit LinkBox Keypad Replacement Kit is a slick new gadget that enables a user to interface with the OEM Dacor control board via touchscreen tablet in place of the failed OEM touchpad.  And it's really easy to install.

    The module ships with a mounting bracket that tucks in right behind the OEM control board.  Then, you just have to make three electrical connections:
    1) Connect the large BoardFruit LinkBox ribbon cable to the OEM control board in place of the OEM panel's ribbon cable.
    2) Connect the small BoardFruit LinkBox ribbon cable to the OEM relay board in pace of the once coming from the panel.
    3) Make two piggy-back spade terminal connections on the OEM relay board which will supply 120VAC to the BoardFruit LinkBox.

    Close the oven up and flip the breaker back on (because you definitely turned it off before accessing the control cabinet, right?).  Boot up the 7" tablet that shipped with the LinkBox and it will load straight into our app and make a wireless connection to the LinkBox (no wifi network required).

    Presto Chango!  Now the oven has a modern new interface while simultaneously preserving the original kitchen aesthetic.

    Interested?  You can check out our website here, but you should message me privately for the Appliantology discounted price.

    Enjoy!
    -BoardFruit

    tablet_product_low.jpg

  4. This may cause a bit of a stir with you guys, but Ill discuss it anyway.   Some of you are staunch users of genuine, OE, brand name appliance parts.  I am not one of those people.  Appliance parts is an expense in my business second only to labor.  My rough guesstimate is that I spend about $50,000 a year on parts. If I used exclusively genuine, new parts that figure could easily go up 20%.  Perhaps even more. 

    Control boards: 

    You can go new, genuine, and pay $200 for it +$60 core, or you can buy direct from core centric (or others) for $98, no core charge.  Sounds like a no brainer eh?  Well, its more complicated than just money.  

    1. The defect rate is definitely higher than new.  I have purchased hundreds, and hundreds of reconditioned boards form core centric.  I would say that 1 in 50 will go bad within 30 days, or be bad out of the box.   I can honestly say that I can't remember EVER buying a new board from Servall that was bad out of the box.  

    2. You are charging your customer "new board" money.  I was having a moral dilemma with this one for a while.  I was able to find a great solution to this.  Guarantee your work parts+labor for 1 year.  Chances are that you will never hear from them again, I have only had 2 call backs that were in the 60day-1 year timeframe.  The bottom line is this: You are offering your customer MORE than what they would get with a "new" board, and you get to make more money. 

    3. The core charge.  I, like many of you, have had north of $500 is core money sitting in your van.  That sucks.  Buying a refurbished board saves that dilemma.  Its all about keeping more money in your pocket!  

     

    Non-complicated generic parts:

    Lets talk about the Direct drive lid switch part # 3949247.  I use at least 3 a week, between COD calls and my shop.  They cost $16.29 at Servall, I get them generic for $2.20. That is a savings of over $14!  I have been using this switch for about 2 years, and I have installed a few hundred, at least.  I have had ONE fail me.  It wasn't even broken, the casting was filled on one of the mounting holes.  If you calculate $14 x the 300 or so I have used so far, you will conclude that I have saved myself over $4200.   I can apply the same thing to couplings

    285753: servall: 6.89, generic $1.50.  

    285785 14.50, generic  $6.50 

    3363394 15.60, generic $6

    Im not even going to tell you how much a complete duet water pump costs.  (hint: its less than $20) 

     

    Id like to mention one part specifically, GE gas oven thermostat WB20K8.  You can get it at servall for $86, or you can buy it from ERP for about $65. I know, its only $20.  The thing is this:  Both of those parts are made by the some company, Harper Wyman  They are the EXACTLY the same part. one comes in a bag, one in a box.  

     

    I have used many hundreds of these parts, and find them to be as good, or better than genuine.  Again, you will get the very rare premature failure, but its more like 1 in a hundred with this stuff.  If you are using this stuff by the dozen, it makes sense for you financially to use it.  

    Electricky complicated stuff like sensors and door locks. 

    Quite frankly I don't use them.  I had a bad experience with some VMW lid locks that were dirt cheap, like $16.  Problem is that none of them worked.  I don't use that many of them, so the saving is not that much to me.   Ref sensors are dirt cheap for genuine, so I would rather buy those.   I will eventually warm up to them again. It takes time. 

     

    Conclusion: 

    There is a time and place for generic parts. I genuinely believe that there are some aftermarket companies that truly want to make a good product, and want to end the monopoly that is OEM.   Some companies are out there selling cheap junk.  You have to try out a company, or a line of parts before you buy in bulk.  For me its worth the slight aggravation based on how much extra money it puts in my pocket every year.   Ultimately you should do what you think is best for you and your business.  

     

  5. Tech notes

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    Recent Entries

    The formula for power in watts is P = I . E where I is current and E is voltage or is it?

    FACT1 : Voltage is the potential for current to flow.

    Theory : Voltage is also called "potential difference" or " electromotive force". As with any measurement we need to have a standard point of reference for voltage that is 0V and another point of interest. The standard point of reference of 0V is earth. Voltage is measured between earth and any other point. However this is not the voltage we should consider in power or work done calculations as voltage in itself does not do work or power in watts.

    FACT2 : Current is the flow of electron.

    Theory: Conventional current flows from a higher voltage to a lower voltage in a closed circuit. Current is a rate measurement that is number of electrons passing a point per second. It is plain to see that higher the potential difference more the electron flow and higher current. Current does work. Current is indirectly proportional to resistance. A definitive test in live testing for a closed circuit or a circuit doing work is to measure the current.

    To summarize, Current only flows and can be measured in a closed circuit. Potential difference is only measured in an open circuit.

    FACT3 : Voltage drop is the voltage that is dropped across a load in a closed circuit. Voltage drop is caused by a potential difference, current flow and a load resistance.

    Theory : Voltage and Voltage drop are very different things which are sometimes mistakingly considered to be the same thing. Voltage can be regarded as a cause, and on the other hand, Current and Voltage drop is the effect only in a closed circuit.

    Only loads have a voltage drop because only they are doing work. Switches donot have a voltage drop. It is voltage will you measure across a switch in a circuit.

    The Load is the final peice of the puzzle. In a series circuit the voltage drop across a load is directly proportional to the Load resistance and current. There maybe one or more loads is series. In this case the  higher the Load resistance the greater the voltage drop since current remains the same is a series circuit.

    Voltage drop in a parallel circuit is the same as source line voltage in quantity but if a brach in a parallel circuit is opened by a switch the there is no current flow through that branch so no voltage drop but there will still be a potential difference or Voltage. The other branches will have voltage drop and the as an effect the total current drawn will be reduced.

    For testing a series circuit we need to switch on and measure current and voltage drop across the load. The product of these two measurements will give you the power in watts. Voltage drop divided by current will give you load resistance.

    Lets consider a series circuit with line voltage, one or more loads and an open switch what is the power consumed by the loads? OK that's easy liven the circuit and measure voltage drop across each load we should read 0V and use the E square by R formula we will get zero power consumed. Remember the switch is open means there is no voltage drop. So zero power is consumed. The switch is a control. However there will be a potential difference of line voltage across the loads when tested before and after the switch.

    Now let's close the switch. Potential difference across the switch drops to 0V and there will be a voltage drop across each of the loads. Current will also be present. Potential difference should be measured using a loading meter to rule out any open neutral fault.

    Protective devices are reactive temperature effected devices. PTC thermistor, bimetals, fuses are some examples of protective devices. They protect the load and the conductors from over current. With the appliance plugged in you should read 0VAC across these devices under normal conditions that's because they are normally closed. In cases of overheating the protective device will open and then you should read line voltage across its terminals. 

    In conclusion voltage and voltage drop are cause and effect respectively. Power in watts is the product of voltage drop and current, is the formula for appliance repairs. To definitely test a circuit we should do voltage drop and current tests.

  6. Moostafa
    Latest Entry

    Hello, my infidel friends. Today, I would like to share with you a sad tale which illustrates the cultural distinction between the low-brow Arab people and the much more refined Pashtun and Tajik tribes of Afghanistan:

     

    Quote

     

    Customs officers at the Hamad International Airport, in the Qatari capital, have arrested a Yemeni man attempting to smuggle more than 12 kilograms (27 lbs) of sliced bacon hidden in his anal cavity.

    53-year old Abd al Rahman Shamoun, was spotted by a specially trained police dog, looking for drugs or pork meat on passengers and in their luggage.

    He appeared visibly nervous and sweaty, so the customs took him in a separate office for a more thorough search and investigation.

    The search revealed 4 larges condoms hidden in his anal cavity, each containing more than 3 kilograms of bacon.

    qatar3-2.jpg

     

    The full story is published here.

    You see, here in Afghanistan we do not have such problems as discussed in the above article, for we consume the "bacon" of male yak. Since it is made not from pigs, our "bacon" is halal, that is, it is permitted under the Sharia laws of Allah, the Merciful and Compassionate, who irritates the bowels of the wicked.

    This article is but one of many examples of Arab dull-wittedness. Had Abd al Rahman Shamoun known about the enlightened Afghani yak "bacon" delicacy, he would not have needed to smuggle the unclean pig flesh in his even more unclean rectum. 

    It is true that my sand-slinging Arabian brethren have a rather difficult time telling the two flesh meats apart since they have no yaks in Arab countries. But penis of yak is an ancient delicacy among the the Pashtun and Tajik peoples of Afghanistan. 

    large.57715cbae54f0_yakpenis.png.6fbcc09

    Although harvesting the "bacon" of male yaks leaves them neutered and impotent, the smoky, salty delicacy is a cherished part of our tribal bonding rituals.

    I would like to point out the squirreling away of items in one’s rectum is an age-old technique of my people to hide our possessions, few they may be, from the many infidel invaders who have troubled our country in the past. It is part of the standard education of all boys here in genteel Afghanistan. Yes, I remember being a young boy and the extreme discomfort whenever I sat down.

    This man in the news article was–how do you say in Ameedica–an amateur. While I was in the elite Appliance Repair Corps of the feared Mujahideen warriors, I once carried my entire tool bag in my rectum for 50 miles past military checkpoints just to repair one, smelly washing machine. I have never been structurally the same since that day though. We shall see what happens to the man in this article, for my keffiyeh-wearing cousins are known to overreact.

    Allahu Akbar!

    Moostafa

  7. Just got done sitting through an 8 hour course on the NEC.  This course goes towards my continuing education hours needed to maintain my electrician certificate for appliance repair (07D Washington State Specialty Electrician).  Most of the class doesn't pertain to our trade, but I was able to pick up a few gems.  

    The National Electric Code (NEC) is the code used by jurisdictions to determine if your electrical supply is up to code, which releases a new edition every 3 years.

    Section 210.8 is where it talks about Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) requirements.  With the edition of NEC 2014, 210.8 (A) reads: All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specificed in 210.8(A)(1) through (10) shall have GFCI protection for personnel.

    Newly added to the the NEC 2014: 208.10(A)(10) Laundry Areas.  That's right.  All laundry areas in new built or remodeled homes will include GFCI to all 120 volt receptacles.

    Another new add on for the 2014 NEC:  210.8(D) Kitchen Dishwasher Branch Circuit.  GFCI protection shall be provided for outlets that supply dishwashers installed in dwelling unit locations.

    One comment mentioned by the instructor at my class today.  "Every year that I teach the class, the NEC adds more locations that GFCIs are required."
     Which was followed by a comment from him.  The Code Panel is talking about adding GFCI to 240Volt outlets to the list of required circuit.  If this is so, the GFCI reset would  most likely be on the circuit breaker, because GFCI breakers are becoming more and more common.  

     

  8.  

    We all want to grow our companies,  but finding and keeping qualified techs or just finding anyone that posseses even the slightest work ethic is a difficult,  near impossible task.  This song laments this sad state of affairs but also is a tribute to the recent passing of one of the greats. 

     

    Scroll down,  start the video,  scroll back up and sing along! 

    Whirlpool Drain (or if Prince was an Appliantologist looking for good help) 

    Maybe you never meant to cause me any sorrow
    Maybe you never meant to cause me any pain
    I only wanted to one time see you working
    I only wanted to see you
    working on a Whirlpool Drain

    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain 
    I only wanted to see you
    Steaming up a Whirlpool Drain 

    I never wanted to be a hard-assed employer
    But neither could I be some kind of friend
    Now please go away,  go work for another
    For your employment with me has to end

    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    I only wanted to see you
    Underneath a Whirlpool Drain

    Dude, I know, I know
    I know  appliances are changing
    It's time we all reach out
    to learn something new, that means you too

    You say you want me to teach you
    But you can't seem to concentrate your mind
    So I think you better pack it
    Since you can't even Ptrap a Whirlpool Drain

    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    Service Owners, if you know what I'm singing about up here
    C'mon, raise your hand

    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    I only want to have one
    Only want to see one
    Working on a Whirlpool Drain

     

    This song debuting on AppLYRICology  Best of Durham Music Vol 1  

     

  9. Well ladies and gents. Sorry I have been MIA for a while. Life has been crazy with service calls and my new technician. Also had our first baby (technician in training) blogentry-82264-0-29266900-1449760812_th. It's been an amazing experience. I am loving every second of it. It has been tough through all the changes which is why i have been absent from here for a bit. But i'm BACK! I hope the Samurai and Durham have been holding the fort down and not letting you guys get away with too much! hahaha.

  10. acfixerdude's Blog

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    It was during the first break of day in the middle of a heat wave when we first received the call. A villager had requested assistance with a situation he could no longer contain. He and his family had been attacked by a once well behaved friend taking residence inside their home. This well-behaved friend had turned into a villainous foe, terrorizing the family by destroying their stockpiles of sustenance when least expected, an action which severely disrupted the family’s daily routine. They called upon us to fend off this rebellious foe and to restore civility back into their home.

    So with a brave heart I prepared for impending battle. With my heavy weapons strapped to my side and only experience to guide me, I journeyed to the residence in need. When I arrived I was greeted by the saddened man and his family, begging me to tame the beast that ailed them. As I stepped into the arena of battle a sinister smell caught me off guard. The smell of burning copper singed my nostrils as I made my way towards the beast’s lair. It seemed to be annoyed by my presence and howled in anger. A great battle emerged as the two newly made arch-enemies began their attacks. Though the beast was a respectable foe, I took swift, fearless action and it was quickly and easily defeated. I had tamed the beast back into a domesticated pet, doing only as it was originally intended to do.

    In order to prevent such rebellion and travesty in the future, I trained the villager on how to properly discipline and care for the now domesticated beast. I left him with the knowledge and the proper tools to keep his family’s stockpiles of food from ever being destroyed again. The villager and his family were eternally grateful and he practically offered his oldest daughter’s hand in marriage as a token of appreciation. As I left his home victorious, I only hoped he’d pay heed to my instructions.

    Was this some sort of animal you ask? I would only tend to describe it as an animal when misbehaving, but no, it was not. Everybody has one of these often friendly devices and the same thing can happen to you and your family if you fail to take notice and learn the necessary information that this young villager learned the hard way. In fact, there are many friendly devices in your home that require tender loving care every so often. If left unattended to for too long it is very possible that they will turn on you and the situation can get very ugly; even uglier than the story I just told you.

    So what was it living in this nice family’s home that turned so villainous and destroyed all of their food? It was that which was originally supposed to keep their food safe from spoilage, insects and other hungry animals; their refrigerator. If you’re not careful, it may happen to you too.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    So, if your usually domesticated appliances start giving you a fuss and you happen to live in or near the village of Lubbock, TX - head no other place than to LBKappliance.com and summon the brave knight to bring your appliances back to order. If you're elsewhere, go to appliantology.org and The Alliance of Appliantology may be able to help you to kick swift appliance butt!

  11. Smashycomman's Blog

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    LONG AGO IN A DISTANT LAND..

    The people were happy. They had not a care in the world. They thought their beloved appliances would always behave. They woke up in the morning to the quiet hum of refrigerators, keeping their daily meals nice and fresh. They used washers and dryers to clean clothes to pristine condition. They used the microwaves to heat their food quickly and efficiently. They thought the appliances would always be there for them, always making their lives easier.

    .....They thought wrong.

    Suddenly, one day, as if from nowhere, the appliances attacked!

    The Washer began spewing water all over their beautiful laundry rooms:

    Washer

    The Dryer began spitting fire and smoke everywhere:

    Dryer

    Microwaves took to the skies, shocking the citizens in horrible flocks:

    Micros

    Fridges stopped cooling the food, turning it into gookus, and then spewed noxious odors into everyone's faces:

    Fridge

    "OH THE HUMANITY! IS THERE NO ONE TO SAVE US?! IS THERE NO ONE WITH THE SKILL TO STOP THESE EVIL MACHINES?!", the citizens cried!

    Have no fear, good people! Your heroes are here!

    Introducing....

    The Alliance of Appliantology

    "Fighting atrocious appliances with aptitude!"

    This Troop of Techs scour the land, searching for any disobedient appliance, doing battle with them, and turning them back into the good machines they were made to be!

    First up, we have the Appliance Technician himself, Walter:

    Walter

    Walter is a monkey. His weapon is a katana, mixed with a flashlight. Good for slashing and scaring off those appliance monsters who are afraid of the light.

    Next is Weswayne, or just Wayne:

    Wayne

    Wayne is a seahorse, wielding a screwdriver-shooting crossbow. Nothing wrong with a ranged weapon!

    Here's Scottthewolf, or more appropriately, Scott the Lion:

    Scott The Lion

    Scott is smartly using meter leads, one of a tech's most powerful tools, he's using them as axes, but I guess that gets the job done!

    Here's some guy named Smashycomman, or just Smashy if you're confused on what a "comman" is:

    Smashy

    He uses a giant screwdriver as a warhammer. There's a better use for that, kid!

    Don't forget about DanInKansas, or maybe just Dan:

    Dan

    Dan is a beaver, who uses a shield and spear with pliers on the end. Stick 'em with the pokey end!

    Last, but certainly not least, is our very own DurhamAppliance, who's gonna go by the very serious name of Durham:

    Durham

    Durham is the highest-ranking member of the group so far. Yes, he's a pink unicorn, but don't let that make you think he won't smack yer teeth out with his mages' staff.

    Our citizens are saved! With their incredible knowledge of the inner-workings of these dastardly monsters, the Alliance of Appliantology takes them down one-by-one, turning them back into the hard-working and wonderful machines they should be. The citizens are very thankful! The day is saved!

    Want to be in the Alliance? Here's one way:

    BEGIN YOUR TRAINING

    Ok, so, I decided to do this after making a "What animal would you be?" thread on the 40-watt club sub-forum. What started as just a dumb question got me thinking about how fun it would be to actually draw these guys as these animals... then one thing lead to another and here we are. This took about 2 months or so. Having a kid makes it so you really don't have much time anymore! Anyway, hope you guys like it!

  12. tpoindexter's Blog

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    I was talking with another tech this morning about checking RPM. this brought up the subject of strobes. As we were

    discussing strobes it occurred to me someone had probably created an app with RPM already. Shazaaam!!! :woot:

    Here's a app that will allow you to test RPM on fans. You can also test motor rpm, if, you place a mark on the shaft.

    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/strobe-light-tachometer-to/id708094321?mt=8

    To check fan speed just dial it in till the fan appears to be not moving at all. That'll give you your RPM.

    Same with a motor if you mark the shaft. When the mark appears to no longer be moving you've got the RPM.

    I'm not really sure if this is the correct use of this Blog thingy, but, bet I'll find out sure enough!! Yeeehaw!!!

    Huh... I hope I wasn't the last person on earth to figure this out!

  13. Miele produces the best dishwashers on the market today. They are high end machines...very quiet, they wash well and last many years beyond the life span of a lesser quality brand. However, like all machines they do break down. One of the most common failures to occur on a Miele dishwasher is the Water Proof System (WPS). That's that mysterious grey box under your sink. What is that thing?

    20150424_165731.jpg?w=300&h=169

    The WPS is a dual water inlet valve. The redundancy ensures that if one valve fails to close the other will, greatly reducing the chance of flooding your kitchen. That brass part on the left attaches to the house plumbing, the box contains the two solenoids and the gray tube contains the water intake hose, the wiring and outer sleeve. When the electronic calls for water the solenoids open and the water flows through the intake hose and into the dishwasher.

    The outer sleeve acts a protection against leaks. If the solenoids leak the water will flow along the outer sleeve and into the drip tray in the base of the dishwasher. When enough water accumulates the float switch will be activated and the water intake will stop. The drain pump will also be activated until the machine is unplugged or the water is no longer present in the drip tray.

    20150424_170739.png?w=241&h=300

    The inlet to the WPS contains a filter and a restrictor. The filter stops large debris from entering the system and the restrictor ensures correct water pressure. The filters often get clogged and can be easily cleaned.

    20150424_165810.jpg?w=169&h=30020150424_165832.jpg?w=169&h=30020150424_165841.jpg?w=169&h=30020150424_165855.jpg?w=169&h=300

    The Miele dishwasher service manual states:

    The WaterProof System (WPS) consists of a number of interdependent safety features to provide protection against water leakage.

    1. Protection against solenoid valve leakage: Each water intake is controlled by an inlet valve. If this valve cannot close properly due to some defect or blockage by a foreign object, a second inlet valve ensures that the water supply is shut off.

    2. Protection against water intake hose leakage: If a leakage occurs, water flows along an outer hose sleeve surrounding the intake hose to the drip pan. Here a float switch then acts to switch off a microswitch which closes the inlet valves to cut off the water supply.

    3. Protection against dishwasher overflow: If some defect has caused the water level in the appliance to rise so that it overflows into the drip pan, and the water quantity sensor has also failed, the float switch is activated. This switches off a microswitch which closes the inlet valves to cut off the water supply. At the same time the drain pump is activated.

    4. Protection against drain pump failure or blocked drain path: In this case the water level in the appliance rises until it overflows into the drip pan where the float switch is activated. This switches off a microswitch which closes the inlet valves to cut off the water supply.

    Thanks for reading.

    David

    RD Appliance Service, Corp.

    http://www.rdapplianceservice.com

    RD Appliance Blog

  14. Here's a Thai-inspired chicken soup that is easy to make and bursting with flavor! It's healthy comfort food with an Asian twist.

    gallery_66_28_153393.jpg

    Ingredients

    • 2 tablespoons coconut oil, ghee, or butter
    • 1 onion, chopped
    • 1-2 pounds uncooked chicken breast, diced
    • 1 inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and chopped fine
    • 4 cloves garlic, minced, divided
    • 1 quart chicken broth (I use either homemade or a box of low sodium, no added MSG.)
    • 1 can coconut milk (look for this in the Asian/Thai section of the grocery store. I prefer regular, not "lite".)
    • 1 lime, juiced, divided
    • ¼ tsp. red pepper flakes
    • 4 scallions, chopped
    • ½ bunch cilantro, chopped
    • salt, to taste
    • optional: Thai fish sauce, cooked rice

    Directions

    Heat a soup pot over medium high heat, then add the coconut oil. Saute the onions with a little salt for a few minutes, then add the chicken chunks with a little more salt. Cook, stirring frequently, until chicken is just cooked through. Add the ginger and half of the garlic towards the end of this.

    Stir in the broth and bring to a boil, then stir in the coconut milk, half of the lime juice, and the red pepper flakes. Reduce the heat to low and simmer covered for at least 15 minutes (longer is fine, too).

    Turn off the heat, and add salt to taste (depends on the amount in your chicken broth). Stir in the rest of the garlic, the scallions, and most of the cilantro (leave a little aside for topping individual bowls). Add the rest of the lime juice if desired. Cover and let sit off-heat for 5 to 10 minutes, then serve.

    Great served over rice. Add a few drops of fish sauce to your serving to knock the flavor out of the park!

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