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  • Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    New FREE Short Course: Appliantology 101 - Your Guide to the Ultimate Appliance Repair Information Tool

    By Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    The internet has been a game-changer for the appliance repair industry. But it only works for you if you know how to work it! Information is key. Professional appliance repair techs work on so many brands and models that access to manuals for disassembly info, schematics, and specifications is a big factor in the success of the repair.  And with the increase in computerization of appliances, war-gaming the service call ahead of time has become critical for increasing first-call completes, decreasing reliance on time-wasting and unpredictable tech lines, and increasing customer satisfaction - and yours! And you can’t war game without the info ahead of time. Back in the old days, we had shelves overflowing with annoying paper copies of manuals, VHS videos to scrub through, and tech lines operators to wait on hold for. Thankfully, those days are over! Now we have Appliantology: the web’s premier appliance repair tech support site.  Appliantology is rich and deep with resources for the professional tech: repair forums with world-class peer-to-peer tech support, live chat and tech help, service manual downloads for all makes and models, live training webinars, and exclusive tech training videos. But like any powerful tool, it’s only as useful as your ability to avail yourself of its many treasures. Some of our professional tech members sign up and only come around every now and then, and then wonder if the membership fee was worth it. It’s disappointing to invest in something and then not really know how to take advantage of it.  The Samurai sheds a tear for every Professional Appliantologist who barely scratches the surface of the site and never sees the power and beauty within! Others learn how to use the site fully, unleashing Appliantology’s power to amp up their repair mojo, and then ask us how we can offer such an amazing resource at such a low annual fee. A Professional Appliantologist membership is $149/year, that's less than $3 per week. When you are well-prepared for your jobs, you will not only be more profitable, but you will have more fun doing it. Who doesn’t want that? To take the free Appliantology 101 short course, all you need is a free registration at Master Samurai Tech which you can get here.  If you already have a student account just make sure you are logged in and you’ll see it in your course listings on your login/welcome page. Take our FREE short course, Appliantology 101, and see how easy it is to get started with the awesome functionality of the site, and then dive deeper into how to really take your work to the next level!  
    • 0 comments
    • 423 views
  • Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Appliantology is Your Key to Appliance Repair Service Call Success!

    By Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    The Old Skool method of doing service calls was to go out on the call and pray to the pot bellied Buddha that the tech sheet was still hidden somewhere on the appliance. The plan being that, if the tech sheet was still there, you could stare at the lines and squiggles long enough to convince the customer you had reached a definitive and scientific conclusion about the problem.  My friends, I'm here to tell you that the Internet has made this Monkey Boy way of doing bidness obso-frikkin-lete! With powerful information tools, like Appliantology, at your fingertips, there's no need to rely on the pot bellied Buddha leaving the tech sheet for you. This webinar will teach you a whole new way of doing bidness using Appliantology as your trusty information tool, every bit as valuable as your Bosch driver or Princeton Tec headlamp, to increase your First Call Completes and profitability. To learn more about all the splendiferous benefits of being a Professional Appliantologist member here at Appliantology, CLICK HERE!  Learn more about Appliantology and it's powerful benefits to you as a professional appliance tech in our free and fun short course, Appliantology 101: Your Guide to the Ultimate Appliance Repair Information Tool.     
    • 1 comment
    • 1,189 views
  • Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Master the Internet in 30 Minutes or Less!

    By Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Wassmatta, Boopie-- got the Don't-know-my-ass-from-that-hole-called-the-Internet Blues? Well, unfurl thy brow and unbunch thy panties, my Internet-bungling friend for the Samurai shall shine the light of wisdom upon thee and make straight thy cyberpaths. And for FREE! Yes, my sweet-- the Internetology Course is our latest electronic offering to the Great Virtual Universe and we bequeath it unto all posterior unto the ages of ages. Amen.  [Read more about the Free Internetology course here]  
    • 0 comments
    • 216 views
  • AlboGator

    LG blowing thermal fuse

    By AlboGator

    I had an LG blowing thermal fuses but every time I went out to check it everything tested fine. I was able to finally find the culprit after the 3rd one blew. What was going on was the high limit thermostat was welded shut. Here's the video.   
    • 1 comment
    • 447 views
  • Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Digital Data Communications in Appliances - Samsung Dryer

    By Samurai Appliance Repair Man

    Most appliances today use computers to control the various appliance functions. Computers talk in logical 1's and 0's which are actually pulses or square waves of voltage that you can see on an oscilloscope or measure with a meter. These pulses are arranged in a specific sequence to transmit and receive information inside the appliance. In this video, the Samurai uses a Samsung dryer to show you what these pulses look like and how to use this information for troubleshooting. Come with me now on Journey of Total Appliance Enlightenment. Learn how to troubleshoot appliances like a real technician at http://mastersamuraitech.com  
    • 8 comments
    • 840 views

Our community blogs

  1. Had some good questions at the webinar on the Bi-Directional PSC drive motor system used in Whirlpool VM washers. Professional Appliantologist members can grab some popcorn and watch the webinar recording here: Bi-directional PSC Drive Motor Systems in Whirlpool VM Washers

    During the webinar, Joe asked how triacs are turned off. I wanted to give a more complete and accurate answer in this post. 

    To understand how triacs are turned off once they're turned on (and conducting) we need to have a little understanding about how triacs work. So that's what I'm going to do here. Before we light this candle, I'll start with the three take-away points that we need to know about triacs:

    1. Triacs are used to control AC power supplies

    2. You can think of them as solid state relays

    3. Triacs are current controlled devices. This means that you need electrons bustin' down the Gate to turn it on AND you need load current flowing through them in order to stay on. 

    Okay, here we go...

    Intro

    The word "Triac" is an acronym that stands for Triode for Alternating Current. "Triode" is the old Skool word for a three-terminal (or electrode) vacuum tube used to amplify a signal. 

    Triacs are used to control a AC power supply. In appliances, they are used to turn the AC power supply off or on. 

    Here's what a typical triac looks like, such as what you might find on an appliance control board:

    medium.Triac_physical_package.png.605024

    Here is the schematic symbol:

    medium.Triac_schematic_symbol.png.3d39cc

    The leads labelled A1 and A2 stand for “Anode 1” and “Anode 2.”  You will also see them referred to as “MT1” and “MT2” where MT stands for Main Terminal. Same thing. This is the business end of the triac where the main working current passes. This part of triac can complete the circuit for lots of different AC loads, from light bulbs to motors. 

    The other important thing to point out is the “G” terminal. This is the Gate and it has the power to turn the triac on with just a little DC voltage, usually a 5 VDC digital pulse generated by a microprocessor. So this little Gate voltage and tiny current can make a triac turn on and pass a heap big mondo working current. 

    Triacs are like solid state relays and, in the appliance world anyway, serve the purpose of the relays with a coil and set of contacts. The difference is that triacs don't have metal contacts that can arc and burn out and don't have a coil. (And, of course, triacs are made of semiconductors and PN junctions. More on that in a bit.)

    Relays are electromechanical devices whereas triacs are solid state devices.

    Inside a Triac

    Triacs have two sets of three PN junctions. Look at the diagram below:

    medium.Triac_PN_junction_block_diagram.p

    As with any semiconductor device, it requires current flowing through it, or more properly stated, electrons being forced through it by a voltage source, in order to collapse the PN junctions and cause it to start conducting. Refer to the webinar recording on “Semiconductors and PN Junctions” in the Professional Appliantologists forum and at Master Samurai Tech for more details on this. 

    The triac is constructed in such a way that a little tiny gate current is all that's needed to “forward bias” the triac and make it turn on and conduct a large AC current that can drive a load like a motor. This Gate current is typically driven by a small DC voltage like 5VDC. 

    Turning a Triac On and Off

    Triacs require a minimum current through the Gate in order to turn on. In order to stay on, they also need a minimum load current flowing through them from MT1 to MT2. This is called the “holding current.” This is why we say that triacs are current controlled devices. 

    When the AC voltage crosses the zero line (the x-axis), the current then goes to zero and the triac “turns off.” So the triac naturally turns off at every half cycle of the AC sine wave. The Gate voltage, which produces the Gate current, must then be reapplied in order to the turn the triac on for the next half cycle. 

    Let's look at this:

    medium.Triac_output_and_gating.png.3b9c7

    In the diagram above, the sine wave is the current passing through the triac from MT1 to MT2 (or A1 to A2, same thing). The notches represent the triggering points where Gate current has to be supplied in order to keep the triac turned on for the next half cycle. Also notice the holding current dashed lines. This is the minimum current that needs to be passing through the triac in order to stay on. 

    AC voltage goes to zero every half cycle (120 times a second in a 60 Hz power supply). No voltage means there's no current because current, electrons, cannot move unless there is a voltage difference between two points as you learned in the Basic Electricity module of the Fundamentals course.

    Since there is no current flowing through the triac at this point forcing the PN junctions to stay collapsed (current drops below the minimum holding current required to keep the triac conducting), the triac turns off and stops conducting.

    To get the triac to turn on and start conducting again, you have apply a Gate trigger voltage (which drives the gate current) to the Gate terminal. If you to want to have the triac conduct through several AC cycles, you have to re-apply the Gate trigger voltage each and every time the AC voltage sine wave goes to zero (i.e., when it crosses the x-axis).

    Here's another diagram showing the gate current triggering pulses:

    medium.Triac_pulse_gating.png.1400f7e815

    A couple things to notice about the graph above:

    1. Look at the timing of the Gate current pulse. It occurs right around the time the AC load current through the triac goes to zero. 

    2. You don't need to keep supplying Gate current the entire cycle to keep the triac turned on, just when the load current goes to zero. So you can supply Gate current in specifically-timed pulses. We're talking accurate timing down to the microsecond. Mind boggling for us; piece of cake for a microprocessor-- they do this kind of stuff all day long. 

    If you were to connect an oscilloscope to both the gate voltage and the voltage output at one of the the triac main terminals, it would look something like this:

    medium.Triac_output_and_gating_pulses_os

    The Gate pulses in the oscilloscope photo above are wider than the ones in the preceding diagram but the idea is exactly the same. Channel 1 is the Gate voltage and Channel 2 is the AC voltage output of the triac. 

    I'm talking about voltage now. That's perfectly fine because in non-reactive devices, like triacs, there is no phase shift between current and voltage. So whatever voltage does, current also does at the exact same time. It's just easier to show voltage on an oscilloscope.

    Notice that the gate pulse on Channel 1 goes from zero to 5.5 VDC each and every time the AC voltage sine wave on Channel 2 crosses the x-axis (at which point the AC voltage is zero). So while the frequency of the AC line voltage is 60 Hz, the frequency of the Gate pulses is 120 Hz. You can see this in the lower right hand corner of the photo above. 

    Since the AC voltage (and hence current) goes to zero 120 times a second, all you need to do to stop the triac from conducting is remove the Gate voltage. Done! 

    The Two Golden Rules for Gating Triacs

    1. To turn a triac ON, a gate current greater than the minimum required for that particular triac model must be applied until the load current is passing through from MT1 to MT2 . Being a semiconductor, temperature affects this and is one of the design considerations the engineers have to consider. 

    2. To turn off a triac, the load current must go below the minimum holding current for that particular triac model long enough for the PN junctions to re-establish themselves. We're talking microseconds here. And, of course, remove the Gate current. With the Gate current removed when the load current (and hence voltage) goes to zero, the triac will not conduct, even if the load voltage later goes to something other than zero. 

    Summary

    1. Triacs are used to control AC power supplies

    2. You can think of them as solid state relays

    3. Triacs are current controlled devices. This means that you need electrons bustin' down the Gate to turn it on AND you need load current flowing through them in order to stay on. 

    Beyond understanding how triacs operate, technicians need to be aware of configurations where a triac is controlling the power supply to a load because this affects how the supply voltage is tested and measured. We go into details on that in this webinar recording: Voltage Measurements, Meters, Ghost Voltages, and Triac-controlled Neutrals

  2. This could be quite possibly the most boring entry I ever write.   The exciting world of the eBay store.   

     

    So, you have a shit-ton of appliance parts, you want to turn that in to cash. How?  Sell it on eBay!  So lets start with the very basics.  You need the following:

    1.internet

    2. computer with printer

    3. a "smart" device i.e.. tablet, iPhone, etc

    4. shipping supplies, tape, boxes 

    5. shipping scale

    6. shelving. 

    7. a fancy table with good lighting, preferably on a grid 

     

    This is the BASIC set up.  No need to drop 10 grand on an operation that is making you ZERO dollars.   You can start off on eBay as a basic seller, and upgrade your membership as your business grows.   Great, so you signed up, got your fancy table, and you want to list that enormous pile of direct drive washer motors you've been looking at for ever.   First you have to sort the 2 speeds from the 3 speeds. Any that are too chipped or corroded looking, don't bother. It will turn in to a return. (more on that later) 

     

    Now you have to find the most relevant part#, add that to the listing.  Take your pictures, and add any other relevant part #'s you can find.  How much to sell it for?  Just remember this: people on eBay are shopping on eBay because they are cheap.  If you are not going to list it a penny cheaper than the cheapest one currently listed, just throw it away. (there are exceptions).  Believe it or not, DD motors don't sell for much.  Worse yet, they cost a lot to ship.  A part that sells for $30 dollars will cost you $15 to ship, and eBay takes 10% off the top ($3).  Paypal will pinch off another 3% So in the end, that $30 sale really only put about a $10 bill in your pocket.  Why bother listing it? Well, if you have 10 of them, thats $100.  And that is sure as hell more than you will get at the scrap yard.  Plus, shipping costs vary, you might get a sale going one state over and the ship cost might be $6.  You really just don't know.   I send everything out free shipping. 

    NLA parts: The exception.  If you have it, and no one else, you can ask whatever you want, even double, triple retail.  I found a stash of these old amana fridge power boards, NOS. I sell them for around $450, which is at least double retail.  They sell slowly, but they sell.  On the other hand, sometimes the customer can be just as rare as the part.  use your judgement . 

    As the volume increases, it becomes more "worth it".  When I first started the eBay store 2 years ago, I quite literally started it myself, on my iPhone, using a 20 dollar scale and my home printer.  once I realized the money, I quickly moved the operation in to my store, and hired a guy.   Now I have 2 dedicated eBay employees, almost 3,200 listings, and dozens of packages going out every day. 

    I currently average about $300 a day in sales, 7 days a week. More recently it has been $200, but before its been about $500.   At $300/day I'm sending out about 10-20 packages. 

     

    So here are the numbers, these are this year, YTD. 

    Gross sales= $69,000

    Expense= - $40,000 (this is eBay fees, shipping, paypal , returns

    shipping supplies= -$1,800 ( i still have plenty of these shipping supplies, likely 6months +) 

    labor/payroll=    - $16,400. 

     

    Total profit this year is about $10,500.   I feel like this number could have been a lot better, however, I hired a person who was basically incompetent.  Out of my 3200 listings I would gamble that 1/2 of them are fucked up.  Nobody will buy your stuff if it has a bad picture, incomplete part #, etc.  Still, That works out to about $1300/ month, and Im not doing anything other than parting out the appliance when I condemn it.  This whole operation takes up about 600 sq feet of my shop.  

    Returns: 

    They suck, the people suck, and they are fucking liars.  Inevitably you will have some fucktard buy a "timer switch" because their washer wouldn't advance in to spin.  Just give them a full refund. Do it immediately.  If you don't, they will ship the part back to you at your expense, and you will end up giving them a full refund anyway.  Fuck it.  just give them a refund right away and try not to think about it anymore.  

    Shipping:

    Almost as bad as returns.  Its expensive, and if you actually want to sell shit on eBay, it should be on your dime.  Save yourself the complications.  Offer free slow poke shipping, offer an expedited upgrade for several dollars more.  There will be some packages that you will actually LOSE money on.  Take it to the chin like a man and move on. 

    There are a couple of side benefits to this business. 

    a. extra "paid for" employees. (last week I sent the eBay guy on the delivery truck because one driver called off)

    b. once in a while you will actually use/need a part that you actually have, and would have never saved otherwise. (not as often as you would think though!)

    c. builds value in your business via inventory and daily cash sales. 

    d. You can brag about being Green, saving many tons from landfill 

    e. You will get more foot traffic for parts sales, once the word gets out. 

    In conclusion:

    I was surprised on how small the bottom line was, I'm sure you are too.  As i write this, I consider the benefit of having that space empty, filled up with more new/ used appliances.  Is $1300/ month worth it?  I really don't have the answer for that.  Im going to continue my eBay store, at least for one more year.  Once I get all my listings corrected, then I can make a judgement on the cost / benefit.  

    For those of you thinking about doing it, I say go for it.  It isn't easy, and you won't actually make any real money for about 6 months.  Its a pretty hands off operation, so it becomes like a passive income.  You can try it for a year, if its not for you, can can simply stop listing.  The stuff that you have listed will still sell, so you can still make money even after you stop working your store.  All you will have to do is ship. 

    Learning everything the hard way, I would advise the following:

    Don't list anything worth less than $20, unless you have a lot of quantity. 

    Try and keep it to one or 2 employees, and try and get them to do other things at your store, like answer phones, clean etc.  

    I feel like the sweet spot is bout 2,000 listings, with 1 employee.  Its manageable, not too much space, and you can still make nearly as much as you would make with 3000 mediocre listings.  Right now I have one full time lister, and 1 part time guy that basically just does shipping. 

     

    You are not going to get rich , but if you have some dead space in your warehouse, and need someone to answer your phone, this might be a win-win.  

     

    Any questions comments criticism ? 

     

     

  3. Tech notes

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    Recent Entries

    The formula for power in watts is P = I . E where I is current and E is voltage or is it?

    FACT1 : Voltage is the potential for current to flow.

    Theory : Voltage is also called "potential difference" or " electromotive force". As with any measurement we need to have a standard point of reference for voltage that is 0V and another point of interest. The standard point of reference of 0V is earth. Voltage is measured between earth and any other point. However this is not the voltage we should consider in power or work done calculations as voltage in itself does not do work or power in watts.

    FACT2 : Current is the flow of electron.

    Theory: Conventional current flows from a higher voltage to a lower voltage in a closed circuit. Current is a rate measurement that is number of electrons passing a point per second. It is plain to see that higher the potential difference more the electron flow and higher current. Current does work. Current is indirectly proportional to resistance. A definitive test in live testing for a closed circuit or a circuit doing work is to measure the current.

    To summarize, Current only flows and can be measured in a closed circuit. Potential difference is only measured in an open circuit.

    FACT3 : Voltage drop is the voltage that is dropped across a load in a closed circuit. Voltage drop is caused by a potential difference, current flow and a load resistance.

    Theory : Voltage and Voltage drop are very different things which are sometimes mistakingly considered to be the same thing. Voltage can be regarded as a cause, and on the other hand, Current and Voltage drop is the effect only in a closed circuit.

    Only loads have a voltage drop because only they are doing work. Switches donot have a voltage drop. It is voltage will you measure across a switch in a circuit.

    The Load is the final peice of the puzzle. In a series circuit the voltage drop across a load is directly proportional to the Load resistance and current. There maybe one or more loads is series. In this case the  higher the Load resistance the greater the voltage drop since current remains the same is a series circuit.

    Voltage drop in a parallel circuit is the same as source line voltage in quantity but if a brach in a parallel circuit is opened by a switch the there is no current flow through that branch so no voltage drop but there will still be a potential difference or Voltage. The other branches will have voltage drop and the as an effect the total current drawn will be reduced.

    For testing a series circuit we need to switch on and measure current and voltage drop across the load. The product of these two measurements will give you the power in watts. Voltage drop divided by current will give you load resistance.

    Lets consider a series circuit with line voltage, one or more loads and an open switch what is the power consumed by the loads? OK that's easy liven the circuit and measure voltage drop across each load we should read 0V and use the E square by R formula we will get zero power consumed. Remember the switch is open means there is no voltage drop. So zero power is consumed. The switch is a control. However there will be a potential difference of line voltage across the loads when tested before and after the switch.

    Now let's close the switch. Potential difference across the switch drops to 0V and there will be a voltage drop across each of the loads. Current will also be present. Potential difference should be measured using a loading meter to rule out any open neutral fault.

    Protective devices are reactive temperature effected devices. PTC thermistor, bimetals, fuses are some examples of protective devices. They protect the load and the conductors from over current. With the appliance plugged in you should read 0VAC across these devices under normal conditions that's because they are normally closed. In cases of overheating the protective device will open and then you should read line voltage across its terminals. 

    In conclusion voltage and voltage drop are cause and effect respectively. Power in watts is the product of voltage drop and current, is the formula for appliance repairs. To definitely test a circuit we should do voltage drop and current tests.

  4. Just a reminder, don't trust your pocket knife's lock open function. I got complaisant and learned the hard way. I knew better but just got carried away scraping at something thinking I'd be done in a few seconds. Well I was, but because the knife folded on my finger and not because I was finished. Sharp serrated mf'r too. 

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  5. Moostafa
    Latest Entry

    Hello, my infidel friends. Today, I would like to share with you a sad tale which illustrates the cultural distinction between the low-brow Arab people and the much more refined Pashtun and Tajik tribes of Afghanistan:

     

    Quote

     

    Customs officers at the Hamad International Airport, in the Qatari capital, have arrested a Yemeni man attempting to smuggle more than 12 kilograms (27 lbs) of sliced bacon hidden in his anal cavity.

    53-year old Abd al Rahman Shamoun, was spotted by a specially trained police dog, looking for drugs or pork meat on passengers and in their luggage.

    He appeared visibly nervous and sweaty, so the customs took him in a separate office for a more thorough search and investigation.

    The search revealed 4 larges condoms hidden in his anal cavity, each containing more than 3 kilograms of bacon.

    qatar3-2.jpg

     

    The full story is published here.

    You see, here in Afghanistan we do not have such problems as discussed in the above article, for we consume the "bacon" of male yak. Since it is made not from pigs, our "bacon" is halal, that is, it is permitted under the Sharia laws of Allah, the Merciful and Compassionate, who irritates the bowels of the wicked.

    This article is but one of many examples of Arab dull-wittedness. Had Abd al Rahman Shamoun known about the enlightened Afghani yak "bacon" delicacy, he would not have needed to smuggle the unclean pig flesh in his even more unclean rectum. 

    It is true that my sand-slinging Arabian brethren have a rather difficult time telling the two flesh meats apart since they have no yaks in Arab countries. But penis of yak is an ancient delicacy among the the Pashtun and Tajik peoples of Afghanistan. 

    large.57715cbae54f0_yakpenis.png.6fbcc09

    Although harvesting the "bacon" of male yaks leaves them neutered and impotent, the smoky, salty delicacy is a cherished part of our tribal bonding rituals.

    I would like to point out the squirreling away of items in one’s rectum is an age-old technique of my people to hide our possessions, few they may be, from the many infidel invaders who have troubled our country in the past. It is part of the standard education of all boys here in genteel Afghanistan. Yes, I remember being a young boy and the extreme discomfort whenever I sat down.

    This man in the news article was–how do you say in Ameedica–an amateur. While I was in the elite Appliance Repair Corps of the feared Mujahideen warriors, I once carried my entire tool bag in my rectum for 50 miles past military checkpoints just to repair one, smelly washing machine. I have never been structurally the same since that day though. We shall see what happens to the man in this article, for my keffiyeh-wearing cousins are known to overreact.

    Allahu Akbar!

    Moostafa

  6. Just got done sitting through an 8 hour course on the NEC.  This course goes towards my continuing education hours needed to maintain my electrician certificate for appliance repair (07D Washington State Specialty Electrician).  Most of the class doesn't pertain to our trade, but I was able to pick up a few gems.  

    The National Electric Code (NEC) is the code used by jurisdictions to determine if your electrical supply is up to code, which releases a new edition every 3 years.

    Section 210.8 is where it talks about Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) requirements.  With the edition of NEC 2014, 210.8 (A) reads: All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specificed in 210.8(A)(1) through (10) shall have GFCI protection for personnel.

    Newly added to the the NEC 2014: 208.10(A)(10) Laundry Areas.  That's right.  All laundry areas in new built or remodeled homes will include GFCI to all 120 volt receptacles.

    Another new add on for the 2014 NEC:  210.8(D) Kitchen Dishwasher Branch Circuit.  GFCI protection shall be provided for outlets that supply dishwashers installed in dwelling unit locations.

    One comment mentioned by the instructor at my class today.  "Every year that I teach the class, the NEC adds more locations that GFCIs are required."
     Which was followed by a comment from him.  The Code Panel is talking about adding GFCI to 240Volt outlets to the list of required circuit.  If this is so, the GFCI reset would  most likely be on the circuit breaker, because GFCI breakers are becoming more and more common.  

     

  7.  

    We all want to grow our companies,  but finding and keeping qualified techs or just finding anyone that posseses even the slightest work ethic is a difficult,  near impossible task.  This song laments this sad state of affairs but also is a tribute to the recent passing of one of the greats. 

     

    Scroll down,  start the video,  scroll back up and sing along! 

    Whirlpool Drain (or if Prince was an Appliantologist looking for good help) 

    Maybe you never meant to cause me any sorrow
    Maybe you never meant to cause me any pain
    I only wanted to one time see you working
    I only wanted to see you
    working on a Whirlpool Drain

    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain 
    I only wanted to see you
    Steaming up a Whirlpool Drain 

    I never wanted to be a hard-assed employer
    But neither could I be some kind of friend
    Now please go away,  go work for another
    For your employment with me has to end

    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    I only wanted to see you
    Underneath a Whirlpool Drain

    Dude, I know, I know
    I know  appliances are changing
    It's time we all reach out
    to learn something new, that means you too

    You say you want me to teach you
    But you can't seem to concentrate your mind
    So I think you better pack it
    Since you can't even Ptrap a Whirlpool Drain

    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    Service Owners, if you know what I'm singing about up here
    C'mon, raise your hand

    Whirlpool Drain, Whirlpool Drain
    I only want to have one
    Only want to see one
    Working on a Whirlpool Drain

     

    This song debuting on AppLYRICology  Best of Durham Music Vol 1  

     

  8. Well ladies and gents. Sorry I have been MIA for a while. Life has been crazy with service calls and my new technician. Also had our first baby (technician in training) blogentry-82264-0-29266900-1449760812_th. It's been an amazing experience. I am loving every second of it. It has been tough through all the changes which is why i have been absent from here for a bit. But i'm BACK! I hope the Samurai and Durham have been holding the fort down and not letting you guys get away with too much! hahaha.

  9. acfixerdude's Blog

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    It was during the first break of day in the middle of a heat wave when we first received the call. A villager had requested assistance with a situation he could no longer contain. He and his family had been attacked by a once well behaved friend taking residence inside their home. This well-behaved friend had turned into a villainous foe, terrorizing the family by destroying their stockpiles of sustenance when least expected, an action which severely disrupted the family’s daily routine. They called upon us to fend off this rebellious foe and to restore civility back into their home.

    So with a brave heart I prepared for impending battle. With my heavy weapons strapped to my side and only experience to guide me, I journeyed to the residence in need. When I arrived I was greeted by the saddened man and his family, begging me to tame the beast that ailed them. As I stepped into the arena of battle a sinister smell caught me off guard. The smell of burning copper singed my nostrils as I made my way towards the beast’s lair. It seemed to be annoyed by my presence and howled in anger. A great battle emerged as the two newly made arch-enemies began their attacks. Though the beast was a respectable foe, I took swift, fearless action and it was quickly and easily defeated. I had tamed the beast back into a domesticated pet, doing only as it was originally intended to do.

    In order to prevent such rebellion and travesty in the future, I trained the villager on how to properly discipline and care for the now domesticated beast. I left him with the knowledge and the proper tools to keep his family’s stockpiles of food from ever being destroyed again. The villager and his family were eternally grateful and he practically offered his oldest daughter’s hand in marriage as a token of appreciation. As I left his home victorious, I only hoped he’d pay heed to my instructions.

    Was this some sort of animal you ask? I would only tend to describe it as an animal when misbehaving, but no, it was not. Everybody has one of these often friendly devices and the same thing can happen to you and your family if you fail to take notice and learn the necessary information that this young villager learned the hard way. In fact, there are many friendly devices in your home that require tender loving care every so often. If left unattended to for too long it is very possible that they will turn on you and the situation can get very ugly; even uglier than the story I just told you.

    So what was it living in this nice family’s home that turned so villainous and destroyed all of their food? It was that which was originally supposed to keep their food safe from spoilage, insects and other hungry animals; their refrigerator. If you’re not careful, it may happen to you too.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    So, if your usually domesticated appliances start giving you a fuss and you happen to live in or near the village of Lubbock, TX - head no other place than to LBKappliance.com and summon the brave knight to bring your appliances back to order. If you're elsewhere, go to appliantology.org and The Alliance of Appliantology may be able to help you to kick swift appliance butt!

  10. Smashycomman's Blog

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    LONG AGO IN A DISTANT LAND..

    The people were happy. They had not a care in the world. They thought their beloved appliances would always behave. They woke up in the morning to the quiet hum of refrigerators, keeping their daily meals nice and fresh. They used washers and dryers to clean clothes to pristine condition. They used the microwaves to heat their food quickly and efficiently. They thought the appliances would always be there for them, always making their lives easier.

    .....They thought wrong.

    Suddenly, one day, as if from nowhere, the appliances attacked!

    The Washer began spewing water all over their beautiful laundry rooms:

    Washer

    The Dryer began spitting fire and smoke everywhere:

    Dryer

    Microwaves took to the skies, shocking the citizens in horrible flocks:

    Micros

    Fridges stopped cooling the food, turning it into gookus, and then spewed noxious odors into everyone's faces:

    Fridge

    "OH THE HUMANITY! IS THERE NO ONE TO SAVE US?! IS THERE NO ONE WITH THE SKILL TO STOP THESE EVIL MACHINES?!", the citizens cried!

    Have no fear, good people! Your heroes are here!

    Introducing....

    The Alliance of Appliantology

    "Fighting atrocious appliances with aptitude!"

    This Troop of Techs scour the land, searching for any disobedient appliance, doing battle with them, and turning them back into the good machines they were made to be!

    First up, we have the Appliance Technician himself, Walter:

    Walter

    Walter is a monkey. His weapon is a katana, mixed with a flashlight. Good for slashing and scaring off those appliance monsters who are afraid of the light.

    Next is Weswayne, or just Wayne:

    Wayne

    Wayne is a seahorse, wielding a screwdriver-shooting crossbow. Nothing wrong with a ranged weapon!

    Here's Scottthewolf, or more appropriately, Scott the Lion:

    Scott The Lion

    Scott is smartly using meter leads, one of a tech's most powerful tools, he's using them as axes, but I guess that gets the job done!

    Here's some guy named Smashycomman, or just Smashy if you're confused on what a "comman" is:

    Smashy

    He uses a giant screwdriver as a warhammer. There's a better use for that, kid!

    Don't forget about DanInKansas, or maybe just Dan:

    Dan

    Dan is a beaver, who uses a shield and spear with pliers on the end. Stick 'em with the pokey end!

    Last, but certainly not least, is our very own DurhamAppliance, who's gonna go by the very serious name of Durham:

    Durham

    Durham is the highest-ranking member of the group so far. Yes, he's a pink unicorn, but don't let that make you think he won't smack yer teeth out with his mages' staff.

    Our citizens are saved! With their incredible knowledge of the inner-workings of these dastardly monsters, the Alliance of Appliantology takes them down one-by-one, turning them back into the hard-working and wonderful machines they should be. The citizens are very thankful! The day is saved!

    Want to be in the Alliance? Here's one way:

    BEGIN YOUR TRAINING

    Ok, so, I decided to do this after making a "What animal would you be?" thread on the 40-watt club sub-forum. What started as just a dumb question got me thinking about how fun it would be to actually draw these guys as these animals... then one thing lead to another and here we are. This took about 2 months or so. Having a kid makes it so you really don't have much time anymore! Anyway, hope you guys like it!

  11. tpoindexter's Blog

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    I was talking with another tech this morning about checking RPM. this brought up the subject of strobes. As we were

    discussing strobes it occurred to me someone had probably created an app with RPM already. Shazaaam!!! :woot:

    Here's a app that will allow you to test RPM on fans. You can also test motor rpm, if, you place a mark on the shaft.

    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/strobe-light-tachometer-to/id708094321?mt=8

    To check fan speed just dial it in till the fan appears to be not moving at all. That'll give you your RPM.

    Same with a motor if you mark the shaft. When the mark appears to no longer be moving you've got the RPM.

    I'm not really sure if this is the correct use of this Blog thingy, but, bet I'll find out sure enough!! Yeeehaw!!!

    Huh... I hope I wasn't the last person on earth to figure this out!

  12. Miele produces the best dishwashers on the market today. They are high end machines...very quiet, they wash well and last many years beyond the life span of a lesser quality brand. However, like all machines they do break down. One of the most common failures to occur on a Miele dishwasher is the Water Proof System (WPS). That's that mysterious grey box under your sink. What is that thing?

    20150424_165731.jpg?w=300&h=169

    The WPS is a dual water inlet valve. The redundancy ensures that if one valve fails to close the other will, greatly reducing the chance of flooding your kitchen. That brass part on the left attaches to the house plumbing, the box contains the two solenoids and the gray tube contains the water intake hose, the wiring and outer sleeve. When the electronic calls for water the solenoids open and the water flows through the intake hose and into the dishwasher.

    The outer sleeve acts a protection against leaks. If the solenoids leak the water will flow along the outer sleeve and into the drip tray in the base of the dishwasher. When enough water accumulates the float switch will be activated and the water intake will stop. The drain pump will also be activated until the machine is unplugged or the water is no longer present in the drip tray.

    20150424_170739.png?w=241&h=300

    The inlet to the WPS contains a filter and a restrictor. The filter stops large debris from entering the system and the restrictor ensures correct water pressure. The filters often get clogged and can be easily cleaned.

    20150424_165810.jpg?w=169&h=30020150424_165832.jpg?w=169&h=30020150424_165841.jpg?w=169&h=30020150424_165855.jpg?w=169&h=300

    The Miele dishwasher service manual states:

    The WaterProof System (WPS) consists of a number of interdependent safety features to provide protection against water leakage.

    1. Protection against solenoid valve leakage: Each water intake is controlled by an inlet valve. If this valve cannot close properly due to some defect or blockage by a foreign object, a second inlet valve ensures that the water supply is shut off.

    2. Protection against water intake hose leakage: If a leakage occurs, water flows along an outer hose sleeve surrounding the intake hose to the drip pan. Here a float switch then acts to switch off a microswitch which closes the inlet valves to cut off the water supply.

    3. Protection against dishwasher overflow: If some defect has caused the water level in the appliance to rise so that it overflows into the drip pan, and the water quantity sensor has also failed, the float switch is activated. This switches off a microswitch which closes the inlet valves to cut off the water supply. At the same time the drain pump is activated.

    4. Protection against drain pump failure or blocked drain path: In this case the water level in the appliance rises until it overflows into the drip pan where the float switch is activated. This switches off a microswitch which closes the inlet valves to cut off the water supply.

    Thanks for reading.

    David

    RD Appliance Service, Corp.

    http://www.rdapplianceservice.com

    RD Appliance Blog

  13. Here's a Thai-inspired chicken soup that is easy to make and bursting with flavor! It's healthy comfort food with an Asian twist.

    gallery_66_28_153393.jpg

    Ingredients

    • 2 tablespoons coconut oil, ghee, or butter
    • 1 onion, chopped
    • 1-2 pounds uncooked chicken breast, diced
    • 1 inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and chopped fine
    • 4 cloves garlic, minced, divided
    • 1 quart chicken broth (I use either homemade or a box of low sodium, no added MSG.)
    • 1 can coconut milk (look for this in the Asian/Thai section of the grocery store. I prefer regular, not "lite".)
    • 1 lime, juiced, divided
    • ¼ tsp. red pepper flakes
    • 4 scallions, chopped
    • ½ bunch cilantro, chopped
    • salt, to taste
    • optional: Thai fish sauce, cooked rice

    Directions

    Heat a soup pot over medium high heat, then add the coconut oil. Saute the onions with a little salt for a few minutes, then add the chicken chunks with a little more salt. Cook, stirring frequently, until chicken is just cooked through. Add the ginger and half of the garlic towards the end of this.

    Stir in the broth and bring to a boil, then stir in the coconut milk, half of the lime juice, and the red pepper flakes. Reduce the heat to low and simmer covered for at least 15 minutes (longer is fine, too).

    Turn off the heat, and add salt to taste (depends on the amount in your chicken broth). Stir in the rest of the garlic, the scallions, and most of the cilantro (leave a little aside for topping individual bowls). Add the rest of the lime juice if desired. Cover and let sit off-heat for 5 to 10 minutes, then serve.

    Great served over rice. Add a few drops of fish sauce to your serving to knock the flavor out of the park!

  14. somerspoint

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