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jpaduchak

Kenmore Dryer Model# 97282100

48 posts in this topic

Thanks for that tip, I'll order one today, but in the meantime how about some info on testing my motor switch and cleaning out the clutch as well as any other thoughts on what may be wrong with this little beauty.  I removed the venting unit where the fan resides and I vacuumed out any lint there.  It really didnt' look to bad.  There was alot of lint in the lower dryer area around the motor.

How do I go about testing that switch?

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

With the dryer unlugged access the switch on the front of the motor.  Remove the 2 red wires from 1 and 2 on the switch, these will be the ones right next to the motor body.  With the motor off attach your ohm meter to these 2 terminals, the needle should not move.  Now look into the front of the motor and you will see a metal tab. assy with springs attached to it.  Take your finger or a flat blade screw driver and pull that forward till it clicks and you should show a reading on your ohm meter.  Release this clutch and the needle will go back down.  Work this clutch back and fourth and see if the button on the switch is giving cont. each time.  There might be some lint blocking this from pushing the button each time.  2 screws hold this switch onto the motor, you can carefully remove these and remove the switch to see if the button is sticking.   Hold this switch together as it will fall apart spilling its guts all over without the 2 screws to hold it together.

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There was some lint built up in the motor and clutch, but I cleaned it out good.  I still have a loss of voltage to the ignitor.  What should i check out next?:shock:

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Ok, the timer feeds the heat selecter switch, which feeds the motor switch, which feeds the  cycling thermostat which feeds the igniter thru the thermofuse  on the vent housing, and the safety thermostat is in the circut.  Get you a volt stick and see where you are losing the voltage, checks the voltage right thru the insulation on the wires.

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Let me make sure I understand this correctly.  The light stick will tell me if I have at least 110V passing through the wiring.  Anything less won't light it, right?  It won't tell me the exact voltage, just that it is at least 110 - 600V???

Second,  Can you direct me to a wiring path diagram or series of that will show me what to check?

Thanks

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Well, I would want a volt stick that tells you the exact voltage thru each wire from the timer and to each possible part from there to the igniter, not just if you are getting voltage.  You say you are getting some volts, but need to see what part or wire is stopping the 120 volts.

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That is what I was wondering exactly, and that doesn't appear to be something that the $25 item at the link above does??  Am I correct in that assumption?

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The light stick is good for a quick, non-invasive check to see if voltage is present or not.  It's a yea or nay, doesn't tell you how much or anything else.  It is a useful tool diagnostic tool but you'll need a meter for more sophisticated tests.  More information on basic electrical measurements here:

http://fixitnow.com/2004/12/appliance-repair-revelation-making.htm

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Ok, exalted grand master and fellow New Hampshireite.  I also want to thank all of you for your help so far as this hasn't been a cut and dry thing.  I have a very simple meter which is what I have done continuity testing with so far...  I'm ok with that, I think.  Seems to have got me this far ok...

What I want to know is with the Volt stick if it will register current under 110V, as my challenge appears to be not a 0 voltage issue, but an insufficient voltage problem...This could cause me a bit of a problem in itself if it's going to detect an under 110V current?

Also, Are there any areas where I am not going to be able to simply measure the current with a voltmeter at a switch or junction?

Ok, I promise this is the last question at least in this post... You guys fix these babies every other day or so.  The current just cut out on this dryer totally out of the blue, to me as an engineer by trade that would lead me to believe that it probably isn't a faulty wire (The wiring looks good and tight) but more likely one of the switches.  Any of the control switches that tend to fail regularly on these bad boys?? Just so I get an idea of where to go first or to double check, and can you direct me to the series of diagrams to make these voltage checks and if the controls have to be set a certain way...

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[user=1403]jpaduchak[/user] wrote:

What I want to know is with the Volt stick if it will register current under 110V, as my challenge appears to be not a 0 voltage issue, but an insufficient voltage problem...This could cause me a bit of a problem in itself if it's going to detect an under 110V current?

Not to niggle, but words mean things and this is expecially critical in the technical world.  Light sticks sense VOLTAGE not CURRENT.  Huge difference because voltage is just water behind the dam that doen no work at all-- current is the flow of electrons created by that water behind the dam is what does all the work in making things run. 

I have seen light sticks illuminate in the presence of voltage as low as 87 volts, regardless of what the package says.  I have also seen them FAIL to illuminate in the presence of a full 120 vac.  Depends on the quality of the light stick and the charge of the batteries in that light stick.  Don't ge me wrong:  they are still extremely useful and I don't go on service calls without mine.  But, like all test instruments, you need to understand their limitations. 

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Sorry, obviously current is what we are concerned with here.  How about answers to the rest of my long question above??:D

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Are you getting 120vac at the ignitor harness?  If so, and you have a new ignitor that was properly installed without damaging it, then the ignitor must glow.  End of line.  If it doesn't, then you're not measuring voltage correctly.

So, what've you got?

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I have a brand spankin new ignitor.  I am not getting 120vac at the ignitor wiring harness.

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Let me add I appear to be getting about 20-30Vac at the wiring harness

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Ok, good starting point.  Now we trace back though the circuit using the exact wiring diagram for your dryer.  Have you already posted that as an attachment previously in this topic?  If not, go ahead and do that now.

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Here is a digital photo of my wiring diagram out of the dryer itself. I can also attach any other picture I shot them of all the main wiring locations while i was doing the diagram.

post-1403-129045085468_thumb.jpg

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Sorry, This is the wiring digram.  Shot above is of the new ignitor and wiring

post-1403-12904508548_thumb.jpg

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you probably have an open #2 coil- check continuity of all 3 coils(expect very high resistance as wires are tiny)- if one is open-get a coil kit. this is a g.e. built dryer- in all my years working on kenmore products,have never seen a g.e./kenmore in gas,only electric.

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[user=637]kdog[/user] wrote:

 this is a g.e. built dryer- in all my years working on kenmore products,have never seen a g.e./kenmore in gas,only electric.

No, kdog, this is a Whirlpool-built dryer.  He gave his model number as 97282100.  Put a 110 in front of that and it pulls right up as the venerable Whirlpool-built dryer design with the lint filter in the top panel. 

JP, now measure the voltage at the 3V wire going to the burner assembly.  It's the one that comes from the operating thermostat.  Looking at your photo, you have two wires that plug into the burner assembly harness: blue and red.  It will be one of those two, physically verify.  One of those wires carries your 120vac (hot) and the other is neutral.  The one coming from the thermostat is the hot (I think I remember it as the red one but don't trust this-- verify for yourself).  We want to make sure you're getting 120v to the burner assembly. 

I don't rely on continuity measurements for coils because coils are electromechanical devices.  This means that they can fail mechanically OR electrically.  A coil can ohm out good but still fail to open.  This is why we're verifying proper voltage on the burner assembly harness.

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Hey, now we are getting somewhere.  I DO have 120vac at the wiring harness.  Would that mean that the coil is the problem??

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Well, we've triangulated in on the problem.  It comes down to the ignitor (which you've changed), the radiant sensor, or the coils.  You can check the coils electrically by ohming them out, as kdog described previously.  As I mentioned before, since coils are electromechanical devices, continuity tests for determining functional state are necessary but not sufficient.  In this particular case, It'll be easier to eliminate the other suspects. 

Do an ohm test on the ignitor (it'll be something high, in the kilo-ohms) and the radiant sensor (should read near zero ohms with the opening taped over to prevent light from entering).  If both of these components test good, then that leaves the coils.

Remember to isolate the component being tested from the rest of the circuit before making measuring resistance.  You may want to review electrical test procedures here:

http://fixitnow.com/2004/12/appliance-repair-revelation-making.htm

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i stand corrected,was much more tired than i thought when i read the header,i thought the model started with 978- but even after looking at the clearly whirlpool diagram!!  now i just looked at the picture of the burner he posted.  think we need another round of beers here!!

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