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kaloalex

L6-20 receptacle determination?

18 posts in this topic

250V L6-20

This sits in the corner of my garage and I'd like to know what it will support.

Elsewhere, the sam has suggested this is likely to be 2 120V lines tied together at the neutral and can be split into 2 20A circuits with the right adapter. He has also hinted the same plug might support a single 240V 20A circuit (single phase).

I'm a broadcast service tech, so I have most of the generic electrician's tools as a matter of course, but need advice on determining just what kind of juice will flow through this spigot.

Help?

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Need appliance parts? Call 877-803-7957 now!

For an unknown receptacle, the best way to tell what's going on with it is to put a meter on it. Check all pair combinations. Lots of variations on this theme: NEMA, non-NEMA, 208v, etc. Some good info here.

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If it is in the corner of a garage, one might conclude it was placed there to supply some large electrical tools such as a welder or air compressor, if it has wires as large as plumbing lines running to it, chances are good you wouldn't wanna be using it to power your block heater - to be safe, locate the circuit breaker and lock it out to prevent any accidental "mishaps"

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[user=637]kdog[/user] wrote:

... if it has wires as large as plumbing lines running to it, chances are good you wouldn't wanna be using it to power your block heater ...

unless you put small enough Breakers, in the Main House Breaker Panel,  to protect the small load ...

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So when I get home, I'll measure the voltage across all 3 spans.

I suspect kdog has it about right: this is mounted in the furthest corner of my garage; it must be intended for shop tools.

So here's my problem: I have this solitary major power outlet in a garage full of 15A GFI plugs and I want to install an oven and a compressor to be run concurrently. I figure there's no safe way to run both from the same 240-20 outlet.

On the house side of the garage the wall is common with my laundry room. My laundry room has both a gas spigot and a high voltage outlet my gas dryer doesn't use. I can't find this outlet at Lightfool, so I'm going to describe it. Bear with me.

4 points at the rose points of a compass. The bottom point looks like a cartoon tunnel. The east and west points are rectangles standing with their long sides parallel. The north point is in the shape of an ell, with it's legs to the north and east.

Anyway, I think I'd like to bring either a gas line or that power circuit through the wall. I'd prefer to run the oven on gas anyway, now that I'm thinking about it.

So, it boils down to this: is it easier and cheaper to bring the gas through the wall rather than the electric, or does it make sense to bring them both through as long as I'm making the effort?

Thoughts?

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[user=61339]kaloalex[/user] wrote:

... The bottom point looks like a cartoon tunnel. The east and west points are rectangles standing with their long sides parallel. The north point is in the shape of an ell, with it's legs to the north and east...

click on picture

a3c0ba22-5226-4027-b9c5-3748f94bd5b1_300.jpg

250v 30a Dryer Outlet NEMA 14-30

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Yep.

Just like in the picture.

So I have 240/30 at that location.

Either this or gas will run an oven.

Big question: Is there a code issue with putting parallel outlets for this breaker on 2 sides of the same wall?

I know having an extension go through a wall is a no-no. If the path is hard-wired, can this rule be ignored?

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So your wanting to remove that outlet and split it into two 120 vot receptacles and put the on the same wall correct? Should be fine, but you will want to remove the double pole 30 amp breake and add to single pole 20 amp breakers if there's room in your box...you can connect the outlest eith a piece of conduit or flex.

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No.

I want to mirror the existing outlet on the other side of the wall. Basically, I want to tap off the line that feeds this breaker (250/30) and put an identical outlet on the wall of a different room (the garage).

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Oh the easiest way would be to add a junction box in the attic and run a new line to the other wall and instead of going in the wall run a piece of conduit down the outside of the wall and add your outlet. Secure the conduit with straps. Is there any water source near where you are wanting to put the outlet ?

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Yes.

The hot and cold washer bibs are about 2 feet to one side of the dryer outlet location. So they'd be within 5 feet of a new drop, such as you suggest. The house was built with Pex-type water lines.

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You should be ok I would check your local electrical code just to make sure of the distance....in SC I believe if your within 2 ft. Of a water source it has to be on a ground fault circuit....5 ft. You should be ok.

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The circuit you have should only be a dedicated supply you cannot branch off of that supply and have 2 240v outlets. If you want 2 240v outlets you must have 2 breakers and 2 sets of supply wires sized properly.

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I think he just wanted 1 outlet but on the oposite wall from the original and I agree he would need to make the original 1 unusuable.

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am I the only one that thinks using a 30 amp set up to run a stove ( normaly 50 amp) is a bad idea or did i miss something

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[user=63038]MR. ED[/user] wrote:

am I the only one that thinks using a 30 amp set up to run a stove ( normaly 50 amp) is a bad idea or did i miss something

The pic shows a dryer receptacle. 

A gfi should be installed if the outlet is within 6' of a water source. 

If you decide to split the circuit up to two 120v circuits you would need to use a 2 pole 20a breaker (such as the one currently used).  Make sure these 2 circuits are on opposite phases with the shared neutral.  If they are on the same phase the neutral could be overloaded and create a fire hazard.

You really should consider getting help from an electrician.  These types of issues can be dangerous if not handled properly.

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[user=69273]jkirksey1889[/user] wrote:

[user=63038]MR. ED[/user] wrote:
am I the only one that thinks using a 30 amp set up to run a stove ( normaly 50 amp) is a bad idea or did i miss something

The pic shows a dryer receptacle. 

A gfi should be installed if the outlet is within 6' of a water source. 

Problem is, most manufacturers don't want a GFI in line with their appliances.

http://fixitnow.com/wp/2006/11/16/using-a-gfi-ground-fault-interrupter-with-appliances/

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[user=34365]ROBBYRIG[/user] wrote:

[user=69273]jkirksey1889[/user] wrote:
[user=63038]MR. ED[/user] wrote:
am I the only one that thinks using a 30 amp set up to run a stove ( normaly 50 amp) is a bad idea or did i miss something

The pic shows a dryer receptacle. 

A gfi should be installed if the outlet is within 6' of a water source. 

Problem is, most manufacturers don't want a GFI in line with their appliances.

http://fixitnow.com/wp/2006/11/16/using-a-gfi-ground-fault-interrupter-with-appliances/

I understand.  I was making 2 comments, may have appeared they were related.  I agree and the way it should be done, with a washer for example, is to install a single outlet, not a duplex.  Then there would not be a convenience outlet readily accessible.

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